the community site for and by developmental biologists

Of Arms and Legs: Shedding light onto developmental gene regulation

Posted by on November 19th, 2018

Written and illustrated by: Bjørt K. Kragesteen, Malte Spielmann, and Guillaume Andrey.   In early development, the forelimb and hindlimb buds of tetrapods are morphologically uniform. However, as limb development proceeds, each individual tissue attains a characteristic morphology that ultimately defines the identity of a forelimb (arm) or a hindlimb (leg). How do undifferentiated limbs[…]

Chromatin-based regulation of development: Funded early-career places available

Posted by on November 19th, 2018

In April 2019, The Company of Biologists Workshop ‘Chromatin-based regulation of development‘ will be held in Wiston House, a 16th century Grade I listed building located at the foot of the South Downs in West Sussex. Organised by Benoit Bruneau and Joanna Wysocka, the workshop will foster discussion of what mechanisms related to chromatin biology are informing[…]

From stem cells to human development: Meeting report

Posted by on November 15th, 2018

In  September, Development held the third of its highly successful series of meetings focusing on human developmental biology. Here at the Node we ran a competition to find a meeting reporter who would share their experiences of the meeting in exchange for free registration. Competition winner Antonio Barral Gil, a PhD student in Miguel Manzanares’ Lab at[…]

Wire together, remodel together

Posted by on November 15th, 2018

Newborn babies are a symbol of immense potential, as they can grow up to be become virtually anybody, from an astronaut to the president. It is no secret that throughout life, there are critical junctions in which specific events or decisions can direct us on one path or another. Such events occur in our brains;[…]

Sex combs in motion: using computer simulations and mathematical modeling to study the evolution of morphogenesis

Posted by on November 14th, 2018

Juan N. Malagon and Ernest Ho tell the story behind their recent paper in PLOS Computational Biology. In the Larsen lab, we are interested in testing a 50-year old question: How do sex combs rotate in fruit flies? Despite extensive studies of the process using 4D confocal microscopy, there remain many questions about the spatial and[…]

Alan Turing’s patterning system can explain the arrangement of shark scales

Posted by on November 7th, 2018

Understanding how complex biological patterns arise is a long standing and fascinating area of scientific research. The patterning, or spatial arrangement, of vertebrate skin appendages (such as feathers, hair and scales) has enabled diverse adaptations, allowing animals to both survive and thrive in varied and challenging environments. Such adaptations include temperature control of mammalian hair1[…]

Behind the scenes of Kicheva Lab

Posted by on November 7th, 2018

Every year our Institute (IST Austria) opens its doors to the public during an outreach event called Open Campus. Visitors can participate in demonstrations and guided tours of the labs while scientists explain their research. But how do you show a variety of different activities performed in the lab within a 20 min tour? We[…]

Call for new preLighters

Posted by on November 6th, 2018

preLights, The Company of Biologist’s new preprint highlighting service, has now been running for more than eight months. At the heart of preLights is the community of early-career researchers who select and highlight interesting preprints in various fields. As the service is building momentum, we are ready to grow our team of preLighters and are[…]

Translational science: drawing the line

Posted by on November 6th, 2018

Humankind has been researching and engineering for as long as we have existed. It was a matter of survival back then and it is still is nowadays. This long and involved process that spanned over several millennia has enabled civilisations to rise and fall. Thousands of years of science and scholarly traditions have led to[…]