the community site for and by developmental biologists

Developmental biology: a Royal stamp of approval

Posted by on April 17th, 2019

Each year The Royal Society, the world’s oldest national scientific institution, elects a new set of Fellows (both UK-based and ‘Foreign Members’). This year, among 62 distinguished researchers from across the scientific disciplines, four developmental biology and stem cell researchers were named, and one name in particular delighted the Development office… James Briscoe, who joined[…]

Meeting Report: Polyploidy in Organ Development, Repair, and Disease

Posted by on April 16th, 2019

Polyploidy is a conserved and frequently occurring phenomenon whose impact on organismal health and disease is poorly understood.  This first symposium focused on Polyploidy was organized by Don Fox (Duke University), Vicki Losick (MDI Biological Laboratory), and Adrienne Roeder (Cornell University), and took place at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine on October 13-14,[…]

One-day Symposium on Developmental Bioelectricity in Boston, MA – July 26th, 2019

Posted by on April 16th, 2019

A fundamental question in biology is how cells communicate to fashion and repair complex biological structures and tissues.  It is well established that cells communicate through biochemical cues.  However, compelling evidence suggests that cells and tissues of all types use ion fluxes to communicate electrically as well.  In addition, it is now clear that this[…]

Development at the single cell level – cover competition

Posted by on April 11th, 2019

This summer, Development will be publishing a special issue showcasing the best research in stem cell and developmental biology, building on the rapidly evolving tools of single cell analysis. Some papers in the issue have already been published as part of our continuous publication system (see the latest articles here), while other research articles and front[…]

Hot fish and the energetics of early development

Posted by on April 10th, 2019

The story behind our recent paper “Heat Oscillations Driven by the Embryonic Cell Cycle Reveal the Energetic Costs of Signaling” Developmental Cell, 48(5), pp.646–658.e6. At the end of 2014, a friend asked me “What is your story”? I had just started my postdoc in the laboratory of Karla Neugebauer and was a bit perplexed by[…]

The Young Embryologist Network Conference 2019: Register now!

Posted by on April 8th, 2019

The Young Embryologist Network (YEN), is an academic body aiming to bring together early career scientists within the wide field of developmental biology, in order to provide opportunities to present talks and posters, network and collaborate, and gain research or career advice. YEN was set up in 2008 by graduate students in the prestigious Department[…]

Beddington medal 2019 goes to David Munro

Posted by on April 7th, 2019

The Beddington Medal is the BSDB’s major commendation to promising young biologists, awarded for the best PhD thesis in Developmental Biology defended in the year previous to the award. Rosa Beddington was one of the greatest talents and inspirational leaders in the field of developmental biology. Rosa made an enormous contribution to the field in[…]

The pattern of research

Posted by on April 2nd, 2019

The correct patterning of embryonic tissues is essential for normal development. Aberrant patterning can lead to developmental abnormalities and pathogenic defects. Therefore, studying developmental patterning is important to better understand disease. The zebrafish embryo is a fantastic model for studying patterning during development owing to its optical clarity, small size and large clutch number. When[…]

Making Multiciliated Cells: The Guardians of Our Airways

Posted by on April 1st, 2019

With air pollution on the rise, our respiratory system is continually abused by a barrage of harmful substances that we breathe in with each inhalation. Fortunately, we are equipped with highly specialised ciliated cells, the multiciliated cells (MCCs), which differentiate hundreds of motile cilia on their apical surface1,2. These cilia beat rhythmically to drive mucus[…]