the community site for and by developmental biologists

November in preprints

Posted by on December 2nd, 2016

Our latest monthly trawl for developmental biology (and other cool) preprints. See June’s introductory post for background, and let us know if we missed anything   This month, we found preprints covering various aspects of plant growth and patterning, a lot of cell biology – including insights into microtubules organisation, RNA localisation and yeast size control –[…]

Science in the City of Angels

Posted by on December 1st, 2016

Since the first reported results from Yamanaka et al. in 2006, pluripotent stem cell culture has become an advantageous approach for modeling human disorders and diseases. The directed differentiation of stem cells into particular cell types can also be the basis for powerful in vitro models of early developmental defects in humans. Our lab is[…]

New phenotype dataset available for embryonic-lethal mouse knockouts

Posted by on December 1st, 2016

    This post originally appeared on Annotations, the DMDD blog.   New image and phenotype data for embryos and placentas from embryonic lethal knockout mouse lines has been made available on the DMDD website today. The knockout data includes the ciliary gene Rpgrip1l as well as Atg16l1, a gene encoding a protein that forms[…]

Advocacy for Developmental Biology

Posted by on November 30th, 2016

To promote Developmental Biology, we should have our elevator pitches ready at all times – whenever there is an opportunity to talk about our discipline – be it to the public, students, fellow scientists or policy makers. This is a first attempt at providing a concise rationale and ideas that can be woven into such[…]

The people behind the papers #7

Posted by on November 30th, 2016

In this series, we interview the people behind some of the most exciting recent papers in developmental biology and related fields, to give context to the work and find out how the story came together.   Today’s paper comes from the latest issue of Nature Neuroscience, and shows that in addition to chemical cues, mechanical signals are[…]

An interview with David McClay

Posted by on November 30th, 2016

This interview by Aidan Maartens first appeared in Development Volume 143, Issue 23.   David McClay is the Arthur S. Pearse Professor of Biology at Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, Duke University, North Carolina. His lab works on the transcriptional control of morphogenesis in the sea urchin embryo. We caught up with David at[…]

The people behind the papers #6

Posted by on November 29th, 2016

In this series, we interview the people behind some of the most exciting recent papers in developmental biology to give context to the work and find out how the story came together.   Today’s paper comes from the latest issue of Development, and reveals a link between phenotypic variability, cell fate switching and epigenetic silencing in zebrafish. Lead author[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 143, Issue 23)

Posted by on November 29th, 2016

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   Syndecan 4 lets lymphatic endothelial cells go with the flow Fluid flow is known to play a role in the development and remodelling of both blood and lymphatic vessels. But how is fluid flow sensed and transduced into a response? Here, Michael Simons and[…]

The flies of Saint Narcís and other animals (and plants, and bacteria) in Girona

Posted by on November 28th, 2016

In October I travelled to Girona, an old Catalan city surrounded by wooded hills a hundred kilometres north of Barcelona, for the 11th meeting of the Spanish Society for Developmental Biology (SEBD). The meeting was jointly organised with the SEBD’s neighbours, the Portuguese Society for Developmental Biology, and also the Spanish Society for Cell Biology,[…]