the community site for and by developmental biologists

Allometry in a Simple Cell Network

Posted by on September 19th, 2017

A post by Jasmin Imran Alsous, on work done in collaboration with Paul Villoutreix and Alexander M. Berezhkovskii in the Shvartsman lab. I started working on Drosophila egg chambers from the day I joined the Shvartsman lab. Egg chambers are small clusters of cells that eventually develop into mature oocytes in the abdomen of the female[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 144, Issue 18)

Posted by on September 19th, 2017

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   Separating nematode species by spermatogenesis During spermatogenesis, unnecessary organelles and cytoplasmic components are shed from developing sperm in order to streamline them for optimal motility. These components are partitioned into structures known as ‘residual bodies’, which subsequently separate from the sperm and are lost.[…]

New Intern on the Node

Posted by on September 18th, 2017

Hello readers of the Node! My name is Sarah and I’m delighted to meet the Node readership as the new intern on the Node, hopefully I will be communicating and interacting with many of you over the next three months. Please allow me to introduce myself and tell you a little bit about myself. I[…]

Mechanical control of the inner ear development

Posted by on September 14th, 2017

Prologue Molecular biological approaches to understanding the complex gene networks regulating development often resemble attempts to understand a Monet painting by looking at it up close. We find the links within a disorganized array of brush strokes and shapes but may miss the big picture. Our recent study is an example of how one must sometimes[…]

Embryosafari: an attempt at illustrating development

Posted by on September 12th, 2017

Hello, Community! In July, I revealed to the world my attempts at scientific illustration. Aidan (The Node’s Community Manager) took a keen interest in my work and was very kind to share it on social media. Here is my long-promised post about my biology art (which can be viewed at www.embryosafari.com). Before I delve into[…]

Internal mechanism found to be responsible for the limitless growth potential of epithelial tumours

Posted by on September 8th, 2017

Researchers from the Development and Growth Control Laboratory at IRB Barcelona have identified the cell types and molecular mechanism responsible for the unlimited growth potential of epithelial tumours (carcinomas) and demonstrated that the growth of these tumours is independent of its microenvironment. “In epithelial tumours caused by chromosomal instability or loss of cell polarity, the[…]

Older wombs linked to complications in pregnant mice

Posted by on September 6th, 2017

This article is recent news from the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, view the original post here and the Nature Communications research paper here. Deciding to start a family later in life could be about more than just the age of your eggs. A new study in mice suggests the age of a mother’s womb may[…]

2017 FASEB Mechanisms in Plant Development Meeting Summary

Posted by on September 5th, 2017

Written By: Margaret Frank, Ora Hazak, Samuel Leiboff, Heike Lindner, Concepcion Manzano, Lena Mueller, Michael Raissig, Annis Richardson, Adam Runions, Sebastian Soyk   A systems biology approach to understanding development The 2017 FASEB meeting “Mechanisms in Plant Development” launched with a keynote by Philip Benfey (Duke University, USA) about the current understanding of root development.[…]

The evolution from mouse to human models of lung development

Posted by on September 4th, 2017

The story behind our eLife paper: Nikolić, M. Z., Caritg, O., Jeng, Q., Johnson, J.-A., Sun, D., Howell, K. J., Brady, J. L., Laresgoiti, U., Allen, G., Butler, R., Zilbauer, M., Giangreco, A., Rawlins E.L. (2017). Human embryonic lung epithelial tips are multipotent progenitors that can be expanded in vitro as long-term self-renewing organoids. Elife[…]