the community site for and by developmental biologists

Synthetic Materials for Human Organoid Generation and Wound Healing (The Journey)

Posted by on November 20th, 2017

Looking back on the journey of: Ricardo Cruz-Acuña and Miguel Quirós et al. Nature Cell Biology (2017) The Start  On August 2013, I took my first one-way trip departing from Puerto Rico. Although I have always been passionate about travelling to as many places (the cheapest way) possible, embracing the PhD-journey in a new city[…]

The 30th HEAD GROUP MEETING (HGM) – Understanding Normal and Abnormal Development of Head Structures

Posted by on November 20th, 2017

Join invited speakers and showcase your work to celebrate the 30th HGM. We particularly welcome presentations from budding scientists to foster networking and collaboration opportunities. This 2-day meeting will end with the Peter Thorogood Memorial Lecture by Prof. William Harris.   29-30 January, 2018 – UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London, UK[…]

Cajal Advanced Course – Developmental Neurobiology and Pathologies

Posted by on November 17th, 2017

3-21 April 2018, Bordeaux Neurocampus, France Neurodevelopmental disorders are a group of different conditions in which the development of the central nervous system is disturbed. This includes developmental brain dysfunction, which can manifest as neuropsychiatric problems (Autism Spectrum Disorders, schizophrenia, fragile-X syndrome, down syndrome), or impaired motor function, learning, language or non-verbal communication. The generation[…]

The people behind the papers – Qiang Shao, Stephanie Herrlinger and Jian-Fu (Jeff) Chen

Posted by on November 16th, 2017

Zika infection in humans is associated with birth defects including microcephaly. Zika has two major lineages – the Asian lineage, which has been associated with birth defects, and the African lineage, which has not – but the relative effects of each strain on brain development, and the effects of the related dengue virus that co-circulates with[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 144, Issue 22)

Posted by on November 14th, 2017

Here are the highlights form the current issue of Development:   Cross-border control of stem cell behaviour Cell identity and proliferation differs between organs, raising the question of how cells at interorgan boundaries are regulated to maintain organ integrity. On p. 4091, Don Fox and colleagues identify a specialised transition zone at the midgut/hindgut boundary in[…]

Special issue of Development on human development

Posted by on November 13th, 2017

Development is pleased to welcome submissions for an upcoming special issue on human development. This issue will focus on advances in our understanding of how human organs and tissues are formed, and how the processes and mechanisms involved compare to those in other species. This special issue will be published in early autumn 2018, to coincide[…]

Addgene Resources to Grow Your Developmental Biology Toolkit

Posted by on November 8th, 2017

Addgene is a global, nonprofit repository that was created to help scientists share plasmids. Before we go over the developmental biology resources available at Addgene, here’s a little background on our organization. Our mission is to accelerate research and discovery by improving access to useful research materials and information. Labs deposit plasmids with Addgene at[…]

Silencing transposons during epigenetic reprogramming

Posted by on November 8th, 2017

Molecules called endosiRNAs help us avoid genetic chaos, according to a new study from a team at the Babraham Institute. Much of the human genome contains pieces of DNA called transposons, a form of genetic parasite. When active, transposons can damage genes so it is important to keep them inactive. At a certain point early[…]

Stem Cells Pave the Way for new treatment of diabetes

Posted by on November 7th, 2017

A new stem cell study conducted at the University of Copenhagen shows how we may increase the vital production of insulin in patients suffering from diabetes. The discovery helps to more efficiently at less cost make insulin-producing beta cells from human stem cells. Therefore, the research paves the way for more effective treatment of diabetes.[…]