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The people behind the papers – Kana Ishimatsu, Tom Hiscock & Sean Megason

Posted by on June 12th, 2018

Somites are segmented structures  which give rise to numerous tissues in the vertebrate body. It has long been observed that somites scale in size with the overall size of the embryo, both as development proceeds and between individuals of different sizes, but the molecular underpinnings of this process have remained controversial. A new paper in[…]

The people behind the papers – Pauline Anne & Christian Hardtke

Posted by on May 25th, 2018

Short CLE peptides regulate a wide variety of processes during plant development. In the developing root, the receptors and co-receptors for CLEs have remained largely unclear, as have the relationships between different CLEs and different (co-)receptors. A new paper in Development addresses this problem by reporting a new receptor kinase involved in CLE signaling. We caught[…]

The people behind the papers – Cathy Pichol-Thievend, Natasha Harvey & Mathias Francois

Posted by on May 22nd, 2018

The vertebrate lymphatic vascular network provides crucial circulatory and immune functions but its developmental origin has been a contentious issue, in particular the question of whether lymphatic endothelial cells have an exclusively venous origin. A new paper in Development addresses this issue in the dermis of the mouse embryo. To find out more about the[…]

The people behind the papers – Samira Benhamouche-Trouillet, Evan O’Loughlin & Andrea McClatchey

Posted by on May 21st, 2018

Intrahepatic bile ducts (IHBDs) are epithelial tubular structures that transport bile from the liver to the intestine, but the molecules and mechanisms controlling IHBD morphogenesis have remained largely unclear. A a recent paper in Development reports an investigation into IHBD development and the role the tumour suppressor and cytoskeletal regulator Merlin plays in the process. We caught[…]

The people behind the papers – Sa Geng & James Umen

Posted by on April 19th, 2018

The transition to multicellularity in eukaryotes appears to be intimately linked to the transition from isogamy (gametes of the same size) to anisogamy (gametes of distinct sizes), and indeed to oogamy, a form of anisogamy with a large, immotile egg and a motile sperm. Volvocine algae provide a useful and fascinating model to study how[…]

BSDB 2018: Meet the speakers & chairs

Posted by on April 12th, 2018

Here at Development towers the excitement is mounting for the BSDB’s Spring meeting, which starts in Warwick on Sunday. The meetings are always great fun but this year promises to be particularly special – the society is celebrating its 70th  birthday and has assembled an all star cast of speakers.     The epic conference poster[…]

The people behind the papers – Jinjin Zhu & Justin Kumar

Posted by on April 9th, 2018

Cell fate commitment relies on both activation of appropriate genes and suppression of inappropriate ones. Polycomb group proteins are known to be crucial epigenetic silencers of developmental genes, but the manner by which they control fate in vivo, and the relative roles of different Polycomb proteins in silencing, have remained unclear. A new paper in Development[…]

The people behind the papers – Rémi-Xavier Coux & Ruth Lehmann

Posted by on April 5th, 2018

Development and homeostasis depend crucially on the maintenance of cell identity, and in gamete-producing tissues the somatic/germline distinction is paramount. A recent paper in Development explores how cell identity is secured in the Drosophila ovary by studying the function of the conserved tumour suppressor L(3)mbt. To find out more about the story, we caught up with first author Rémi-Xavier[…]

The people behind the papers – You Wu & Mineko Kengaku

Posted by on March 12th, 2018

Neuronal migration is critical for mammalian brain development. In many migrating neurons, the nucleus translocates from the trailing to the leading edge of the cell in a manner dependent on the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, but how these cytoskeletons interact and their relative contribution to the forces that move the nucleus has remained unclear. This[…]

The people behind the papers – Marina Matsumiya & Ryoichiro Kageyama

Posted by on February 19th, 2018

Vertebrate segmentation involves the periodic formation of somites from the presomitic mesoderm, in a manner controlled by oscillating gene expression (the oscillations of the segmentation clock must be one of the marvels of nature!). While in vivo work has provided a framework for studying the process, many aspects of segmentation dynamics are obscured in the embryo. A new Techniques[…]