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The BSDB Archive now available at the John Innes Centre

Posted by on February 19th, 2019

The BSDB Archive covers 70 years of our society’s history, providing deep insights into its early years, its long trail of scientific conferences, workshops and committee meetings; it includes an almost complete collection of the many newsletters that have been published since issue 1 came out in 1979. A year ago, many of the archive’s[…]

EmbryoPhenomics: An open-source technological platform

Posted by on February 5th, 2019

Tills O, Spicer JI, Grimmer A, Marini S, Jie VW, Tully E, Rundle SD. 2018. A high-throughput and open-source platform for embryo phenomics. PLOS Biology, 16:1-19. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.3000074 Background A seasoned graduate student gave me some valuable advice at the outset of my PhD. She told me to FIND A BETTER WAY!  We were both working on[…]

What makes preprints popular?

Posted by on January 31st, 2019

A team of preLights selectors respond to a meta-analysis of bioRxiv preprints. Gautam Dey, Zhang-He Goh, Lars Hubatsch, Maiko Kitaoka, Robert Mahen, Máté Palfy, Connor Rosen and Samantha Seah* *all authors contributed equally; cross-posted from here.   The growing adoption of preprints over the last five years in the biological sciences has driven discussion within[…]

Genetics Unzipped podcast – 005 – Vegetable soup

Posted by on January 31st, 2019

In the latest episode of Genetics Unzipped, Kat Arney is exploring some more of the leading 100 ideas in genetics. She’s been digging around in the genetic vegetable patch in search of flavourful GM tomatoes, chunky onion genomes and Mendelian peas. Available on Apple podcasts/iTunes, Spotify and all good podcast apps, and online at GeneticsUnzipped.com If you[…]

Genetics Unzipped – 004 – Witness the fitness

Posted by on January 17th, 2019

In the latest episode of Genetics Unzipped, Kat Arney is reporting back from the Genetics Society’s Autumn meeting – Genotype to Phenotype to Fitness – asking whether street smart city-dwelling birds are genetically different from their country bumpkin relatives, how butterflies got their brightly patterned wings, and if today’s genetic research would have blown Darwin’s mind.[…]

Genetics Unzipped – a new podcast exploring the world of genes, genomes and DNA

Posted by on January 10th, 2019

  Genetics Unzipped – a new fortnightly podcast from the UK Genetics Society – has launched ahead of the society’s centenary celebrations throughout 2019. Presented by award-winning science writer and former Naked Genetics/Naked Scientists podcast host Kat Arney and produced by First Create The Media, Genetics Unzipped will bring you a wide range of stories[…]

Travel Grants: To Conferences of Your Choice

Posted by on October 4th, 2018

Antibodies.com is proud to support researchers with travel grants up to £500. The Award: Each quarter, Antibodies.com offers a travel grant up to £500 to help cover the cost of attending a conference. These travel grants are open to PhD candidates, lab managers, and post-docs from academic research institutions across Europe. The grant is intended[…]

English Translation of Classic Paper in Animal Genetics

Posted by on October 4th, 2018

Soon after the rediscovery of Mendel’s laws of inheritance in plants, French scientist Lucien Cuénot published a paper in 1902, reporting his studies of the inheritance of pigmentation in the house mouse. Cuénot’s results showed that Mendel’s laws of inheritance also applied to animals. This is a fundamental paper in the field of genetics. The[…]

The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is creating an encyclopaedia of mammalian gene function, from embryo to adult

Posted by on September 28th, 2018

The entire genome of many species has now been sequenced, but the function of the majority of genes still remains unknown. This is where the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comes in, with the goal of characterising all 20,000 or so protein-coding mouse genes. To achieve this, genes are systematically inactivated then mice are put[…]

Showing distributions

Posted by on August 6th, 2018

When reading about co-evolution of prey and predators, I stumbled across a cute new plot type: a half boxplot, half dot plot to show data distributions.     Wilson used this plot to simultaneously visualize summaries about their data (center, spread) and the actual data points. This allows us, the audience, to learn a lot[…]