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Displaying posts with the tag: a-day-in-the-life [Clear Filter]

A day in the life of a modern Lernaean Hydra…

Posted by on July 3rd, 2017

I am Eleni Chrysostomou, a PhD student in Uri Frank‘s lab at the National University of Ireland, Galway. The Frank lab’s general interest is development and regeneration, stem and germ cell biology, neural fate commitment, and the chromatin biology underlying these processes. The focus of my project is the roles of SoxB transcription factors (TFs)[…]

A day in the life of an Oikopleura Lab

Posted by on May 23rd, 2017

The recent bloom of genomic data from all of life’s kingdoms is revealing a novel perspective of gene loss as a pervasive source of genetic variation with a great potential to generate phenotypic diversity and to shape the evolution of gene networks. How do genes become dispensable and subsequently lost? Are patterns of gene loss[…]

A day in the life of a larval-microbe lab

Posted by on March 21st, 2017

Hello, my name is Tyler Carrier and I am a second year PhD student in the laboratory of Adam Reitzel at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Broadly speaking, this laboratory focuses on the ecology, evolution, and development of marine invertebrates and their life history stages. The basis of this work uses echinoderms and[…]

A day in the life of a mayfly lab

Posted by on January 5th, 2017

I am Isabel Almudi, a postdoctoral researcher in Fernando Casares’ lab, at the Andalusian Centre for Developmental Biology (CABD) in Seville, Spain. In the lab we are focused on studying the control of organ size and identity during development and evolution.     The lab uses the development of insect eyes to investigate the mechanisms[…]

A Day in the Life of a Coral Lab

Posted by on November 8th, 2016

Hi, I’m Yuuri Yasuoka, a postdoc in the Marine Genomics Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST). Okinawa is a subtropical Japanese island surrounded by beautiful coral reefs (Figure 1). Why do we study coral here? OIST is the best place in Japan to study coral, with the good access[…]

A day in the life of a ctenophore lab

Posted by on September 1st, 2016

Who are we? Hi, my name is Ruairi Kavanagh and I’m a Master’s student at Plymouth University. For my dissertation I am based in The Marine Biological Association (MBA). I am carrying out my research in the recently established Burkhardt Lab. Our lab’s research is focused on tracing the origin and evolution of synaptic proteins,[…]

A day in the life of a sponge lab (yes, there are labs devoted to these animals!)

Posted by on August 24th, 2016

Forget about those large amounts of bottles containing thousands of flies, those huge piles of boxes containing different lineages of mice or large tanks filled with happy-hopping frogs. Also, forget about transgenic, mutant, knockout litters… what I am going to tell you is the routine of an emergent lab working (or, better, trying to) with[…]

A day in the life of a cricket lab

Posted by on July 14th, 2016

I am Yoshimasa Hamada, a Research Fellow in Okayama University Graduate School in Japan, working with Prof. Kenji Tomioka, Prof. Hideyo Ohuchi, Prof. Sumihare Noji and Dr. Tetsuya Bando. Our research focuses on the molecular mechanisms underlying leg regeneration, embryonic development, and circadian rhythm using the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus (Figure 1).     The[…]

A day in the cleanroom

Posted by on June 28th, 2016

Hello guys, I am a PhD student from University of Strathclyde, UK. My PhD career has two parts: microfabrication and neural recordings. With the help of novel semiconductor fabrication techniques, I can make micro-level devices for neuroscience applications such as neural recordings and optogenetics. The whole fabrication process is done in the cleanroom which can[…]

A day in the life of a gar lab

Posted by on June 21st, 2016

My name is Martin Minařík and I am a PhD student in Robert Cerny’s lab at Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. Our lab focuses mostly on the development of non-teleost fishes, namely bichirs, sturgeons, and gars. The advantage of having these animals as model organisms is that their breeding seasons alternate throughout the year,[…]