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Matching neurons to limbs: an evolutionary perspective on motor system development

Posted by on February 24th, 2017

Comment on “Divergent Hox Coding and Evasion of Retinoid Signaling Specifies Motor Neurons Innervating Digit Muscles” Neuron 93, 1–14, February 22, 2017. Alana I. Mendelsohn, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Jeremy S. Dasen, Department of Neuroscience, NYU Thomas M. Jessell, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University[…]

The people behind the papers #5

Posted by on October 25th, 2016

So far in this series, we’ve featured fly nuclear pores, lizard tails, squid eyes and mouse digits, and heard from researchers working in Germany, the US and Canada. Today, we switch model system and geographical location once again. The work was published recently in Development, and uses timed inhibition of sonic hedgehog signalling during chick[…]

Forgotten classics: Tracing the heart

Posted by on August 17th, 2016

de la Cruz, M.V., Sánchez-Gómez, C. & Palomino, M.A. (1989) The primitive cardiac regions in the straight tube heart (Stage 9–) and their anatomical expression in the mature heart: an experimental study in the chick embryo. Journal of Anatomy 165: 121-131. Recommended by Benoit Bruneau, Gladstone Institute for Cardiovascular Disease   Two previous posts in[…]

Revisiting the classics: coupling embryology with genomics to alter cell fate

Posted by on July 13th, 2016

Comment on “Reprogramming of avian neural crest axial identity and cell fate“, Science 352, 1570-1573, (2016). Marcos Simoes-Costa, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University Marianne Bronner, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology   In the 19th century, most embryologists (i.e. precursors to developmental biologists) accepted the germ layer theory[…]

Stable and bicistronic expression of two genes in somite- and lateral plate-derived tissues to study chick limb development

Posted by on November 27th, 2015

The electroporation technique is widely used in developmental biology to deliver foreign DNA into cells and study gene function. The chick embryos exhibit a remarkable easy access to perform electroporation and follow in ovo development. Electroporation of limb somites allows the misexpression of genes in limb somite derivatives, like myogenic and endothelial cells, while electroporation[…]

BSDB Gurdon Summer Studentship Report (2)

Posted by on November 27th, 2014

In 2014, the BSDB has initiated the Gurdon Summer Studentship program with the intention to provide highly motivated students with exceptional qualities and a strong interest in Developmental Biology an opportunity to engage in practical research. The 10 successful applicants spent 8 weeks in the research laboratories of their choices, and the feedback we received[…]

Full-term development of quail chick by ICSI

Posted by on October 18th, 2014

The eggs of domestic birds have been used in the study of developmental biology, leading to the extensive accumulation of knowledge on embryonic development. However, the early events involved in bird development, particularly the mechanism underlying fertilization, have not been elucidated in as much detail as those of other species of animals. The ooplasm in[…]

Gastrulation: Local actions, global movements and self-organisation

Posted by on June 6th, 2014

Cells move in (still) mysterious ways to achieve morphogenesis. Prominently, cells of an early vertebrate embryo (blastula, a mass of undifferentiated cells) move extensively during gastrulation to generate the three basic layers of the organism: ectoderm at the surface, endoderm presaging the digestive tube, and the mesoderm in between. At the end of the process,[…]

6th Young Embryologist Annual Meeting

Posted by on April 8th, 2014

6th Young Embryologist Annual Meeting Friday 27th June 2014 JZ Young LT, Anatomy Building, University College London Registation and abstract submission now open The 6th Young Embryologist Meeting aims to bring together developmental biologists from across the UK and abroad to discuss their work at a leading UK institution by presenting a talk or a[…]

From SNPs to starlings: Avian Model Systems 2014, 5th-8th March

Posted by on March 17th, 2014

Deep snow failed to chill the atmosphere at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories as the most diverse Avian Model Systems meeting yet took place. The model organisms involved included transgenic quail and zebra finches, canaries, and even barn owls and the American white-throated sparrow, alongside the more prosaic chicken. The interaction of ideas from the endocrine[…]