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Displaying posts with the tag: developmental-biology [Clear Filter]

This year for Christmas, gift yourself with an amazing experience. Apply today for the 2018 CSHL Cell and Developmental Biology of Xenopus course.

Posted by on December 18th, 2017

The end of the year is quickly approaching, and if you are anything like me you are scrambling to try to get as much work done as possible before your holiday break. But while this frequently entails getting papers submitted, committee meetings completed, and experiments wrapped up, I also take the opportunity to reflect on[…]

A community approach to science communication

Posted by on December 14th, 2017

Science communication (scicomm) has become a buzz term in the current science landscape. I fully support its importance and have been a scicomm “activist” for over 6 years. My initiatives promote the enormous importance of Developmental Biology as a key discipline of the biomedical sciences (see our advocacy campaign); within this context, I put specific[…]

It’s in the head: How male and female fruit flies grow apart

Posted by on December 7th, 2017

A discussion of our recent paper: Annick Sawala & Alex P. Gould (2017). The sex of specific neurons controls female body growth in Drosophila. PLoS Biology, October 4 2017.   In the beginning… The story behind this study provides yet another example of where the pursuit of a few chance observations developed into an interesting project[…]

BSDB Gurdon Summer Studentship Report (21)

Posted by on December 5th, 2017

Established  by the British Society for Developmental Biology in 2014, The Gurdon/The Company of Biologists Summer Studentship scheme provides financial support to allow highly motivated undergraduate students an opportunity to engage in practical research during their summer vacation. Each year, ten successful applicants spend eight weeks in the research laboratories of their choices, and the feedback[…]

Embryonic development inspires regenerative medicine

Posted by on November 27th, 2017

The European Molecular Biology Lab (EMBL) in Barcelona and IRB Barcelona bring together leading scientists in the conference “Morphogenetic Engineering”, an event supported by the BBVA Foundation. The merge of various disciplines of developmental biology is key to enhancing our knowledge of tissue development and repair, processes that find their most direct applications in regenerative[…]

Synthetic Materials for Human Organoid Generation and Wound Healing (The Journey)

Posted by on November 20th, 2017

Looking back on the journey of: Ricardo Cruz-Acuña and Miguel Quirós et al. Nature Cell Biology (2017) The Start  On August 2013, I took my first one-way trip departing from Puerto Rico. Although I have always been passionate about travelling to as many places (the cheapest way) possible, embracing the PhD-journey in a new city[…]

Research Assistant in Developmental and Regenerative Medicine – University of Oxford

Posted by on November 6th, 2017

Research Assistant in Developmental and Regenerative Medicine Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics & Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford Grade 6: £28,098 p.a. Applications are invited for an experienced and meticulous Research Assistant to join the Cardiovascular Development, Repair and Regeneration team working under the direct supervision of Professor Paul Riley and Dr[…]

Ph.D. positions in Developmental Biology, Morphogenesis, Cardiovascular Biology-University of Mississippi

Posted by on October 13th, 2017

  Our research seeks to investigate the fundamental question of how cardiac cells sense and respond to their environment. Focusing on tissue interactions we seek to understand the mechanisms underlying the regulation of morphogenic and identity transformations that occur during development and disease. We use the assembly of the heart tube in zebrafish as our[…]

Two fully-funded PhD positions in Wnt trafficking at the LSI in Exeter

Posted by on October 9th, 2017

The process of subdividing a tissue into functional units represents a classic problem in pattern formation. Signalling proteins – so-called morphogens – orchestrate this process. The traditional view is that morphogens are released from local source and slowly diffuse through a neighbouring tissue to build up a gradient. As Wnt signals act as a key[…]

Layered patterning systems in hair development

Posted by on September 28th, 2017

The story behind our recent paper  ‘Hierarchical patterning modes orchestrate hair follicle morphogenesis‘ , finding that distinct patterning mechanisms can co-exist during embryonic organ formation.   From the spots of a leopard and stripes on a zebra to the pigmentation of sea shells and arrangement of sand dunes in a desert, repeating patterns are present[…]