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Plant Developmental Biologist – Imaging specialist – MPIPZ, Cologne Germany

Posted by on November 14th, 2018

The department of Comparative Development and Genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIZ) is seeking a   Plant Developmental Biologist – Imaging specialist (50%)   The successful applicant will be involved in research and contribute to operations in the area of Genetics and Evolution of Morphogenesis under the direction of the[…]

Plant Developmental Biologist – MPIPZ, Cologne Germany

Posted by on November 14th, 2018

The department of Comparative Development and Genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIZ) is seeking a   Plant Developmental Biologist   The successful applicant will be involved in research and contribute to operations in the area of Genetics and Evolution of Morphogenesis under the direction of the Director Prof. Miltos Tsiantis.[…]

Mouse embryology

Posted by on October 30th, 2018

Practical training course March13-15, 2019 Strasbourg, France Program and registration (No Ratings Yet) Loading…

Utah Fish Conference 2018: Meeting Summary

Posted by on October 25th, 2018

The Zebrafish Interest Group at the University of Utah held its first Utah Fish Conference (UFC) on October 8, 2018. The conference was organized by pre- and post-doctoral trainees to celebrate the University’s Zebrafish Interest Group (ZIG), as well as to unite the Mountain West fish community. This 1-day event hosted over 80 attendees from[…]

Scaling the Fish: An L.A. Story

Posted by on October 18th, 2018

Jeff Rasmussen tells the story behind his recent paper from the Sagasti Lab in Dev Cell. This project began as an extension of my earlier postdoc work in Alvaro Sagasti’s lab investigating removal of axon debris following skin injuries in the larval zebrafish [1] and led me into scientific territory that I never anticipated. It[…]

Postdoc – The evolution of spiral cleavage

Posted by on October 4th, 2018

An ERC-funded Postdoctoral Research Assistant position is available at Queen Mary University of London in Dr José M (Chema) Martín-Durán’s group. The project focuses on the epigenetic regulation of conditional and autonomous development in spiral cleavage. Queen Mary is one of the top research-led universities in the UK and was ranked 9th among the UK[…]

Postdoctoral Position on mammalian gastrulation

Posted by on October 3rd, 2018

Research Associate/Fellow position (3 years) to work on a BBSRC funded project investigating cell fate regulation during mammalian gastrulation in the laboratory of Dr. Ramiro Alberio (U. of Nottingham, UK), in collaboration with Prof. Jennifer Nichols (U. of Cambridge, UK) and Dr Matt Loose (U. of Nottingham). Project description: The project will investigate the molecular[…]

Autonomous traffic – Wnt cytonemes lead the way.

Posted by on October 2nd, 2018

by Lauren Porter and Steffen Scholpp Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter, UK   The importance of Wnt signalling in developmental processes, wound healing and stem cell control has long been established. Historically, scientists attributed the transport of Wnt proteins from the source to the receiver cell to simple diffusion, however, this explanation did not[…]

The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is creating an encyclopaedia of mammalian gene function, from embryo to adult

Posted by on September 28th, 2018

The entire genome of many species has now been sequenced, but the function of the majority of genes still remains unknown. This is where the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comes in, with the goal of characterising all 20,000 or so protein-coding mouse genes. To achieve this, genes are systematically inactivated then mice are put[…]

Fat to the forefront of histone regulation

Posted by on August 21st, 2018

All life requires energy. For early metazoan development, demand is especially high, as the transition from a single cell to a complex, multicellular organism requires a massive energetic input. In the earliest stages of development, however, an organisms’ inability to feed poses an apparent problem: how is the energy necessary to drive development obtained? In[…]