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Displaying posts with the tag: epigenetics [Clear Filter]

Development Special Issue: Chromatin and Epigenetics

Posted by on March 14th, 2019

Development invites you to submit your latest research for our upcoming special issue: Chromatin and Epigenetics. This issue will be coordinated by several of our Academic Editors who are experts in this field: Benoit Bruneau, Haruhiko Koseki, Susan Strome and Maria Elena Torres-Padilla. Recent years have seen huge advances in our understanding of how DNA and histone modifications, chromatin[…]

University of Bath – Post-Doctoral Research Associate (Fixed-Term Post)

Posted by on March 11th, 2019

We seek to appoint an ambitious Research Associate to work on a research project elucidating a signalling pathway governed by the imprinted genes Dlk1 and Grb10. The pathway regulates fetal growth, lean to adipose body proportions and energy homeostasis, with relevance to growth disorders, obesity and diabetes. The successful candidate will use mouse genetic, biochemical and cell biology[…]

‘Chromatin-based regulation of development’ – Early-career researcher places available

Posted by on October 15th, 2018

The Company of Biologists’ Workshops provide leading experts and early career scientists from a diverse range of scientific backgrounds with a stimulating environment for the cross fertilization of interdisciplinary ideas. The April 2019 Workshop looks a treat for fans of developmental gene regulation. Co-organised by Benoit Bruneau and Joanna Wysocka, ‘Chromatin-based regulation of development‘ will bring together scientists who[…]

The people behind the papers – Anjali Rao & Carole LaBonne

Posted by on August 9th, 2018

The neural crest is a progenitor population with the capacity to contribute to all vertebrate germ layers. The transcription factor and signalling pathway activity underlying this remarkable pluripotency have been well studied, but the role of the epigenetic state is less well understood. A new paper in Development examines the role of histone acetylation in regulating[…]

Postdoctoral Position in Pluripotency, Signaling and Epigenetics, Washington University School of Medicine

Posted by on July 13th, 2018

A postdoctoral position is available in the lab of Thorold Theunissen at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, USA (theunissenlab.wustl.edu). Our research program is dedicated to exploring the molecular regulation of pluripotent stem cells and their applications in regenerative medicine. We have developed methods for inducing and maintaining human embryonic stem cells[…]

PostDoc Position on Ageing and Fertility in the Payer Lab (CRG Barcelona)

Posted by on July 11th, 2018

We are looking for a highly skilled and motivated candidate to join our group for a PostDoc position. In the Payer lab (http://www.crg.eu/bernhard_payer), we study epigenetic reprogramming in the mammalian germ line and the effects of ageing on fertility. In this project the prospective candidate will study the molecular links between ageing and oocyte quality decline[…]

The people behind the papers – Jinjin Zhu & Justin Kumar

Posted by on April 9th, 2018

Cell fate commitment relies on both activation of appropriate genes and suppression of inappropriate ones. Polycomb group proteins are known to be crucial epigenetic silencers of developmental genes, but the manner by which they control fate in vivo, and the relative roles of different Polycomb proteins in silencing, have remained unclear. A new paper in Development[…]

In vivo profiling of chromatin accessibility with CATaDa

Posted by on March 13th, 2018

The following post is an introduction into the technnique described in our recent paper: Aughey, G.N., et al., CATaDa reveals global remodelling of chromatin accessibility during stem cell differentiation in vivo. Elife, 2018. 7.   Attempting to understand the biology of a complex organ, like the brain, comes with an array of technical challenges. Those[…]

Silencing transposons during epigenetic reprogramming

Posted by on November 8th, 2017

Molecules called endosiRNAs help us avoid genetic chaos, according to a new study from a team at the Babraham Institute. Much of the human genome contains pieces of DNA called transposons, a form of genetic parasite. When active, transposons can damage genes so it is important to keep them inactive. At a certain point early[…]

Older wombs linked to complications in pregnant mice

Posted by on September 6th, 2017

This article is recent news from the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, view the original post here and the Nature Communications research paper here. Deciding to start a family later in life could be about more than just the age of your eggs. A new study in mice suggests the age of a mother’s womb may[…]