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Displaying posts with the tag: mice [Clear Filter]

The people behind the papers – Qiang Shao, Stephanie Herrlinger and Jian-Fu (Jeff) Chen

Posted by on November 16th, 2017

Zika infection in humans is associated with birth defects including microcephaly. Zika has two major lineages – the Asian lineage, which has been associated with birth defects, and the African lineage, which has not – but the relative effects of each strain on brain development, and the effects of the related dengue virus that co-circulates with[…]

The right information

Posted by on October 19th, 2017

Oscar H. Ocaña and M. Angela Nieto Comment on “A right-handed signalling pathway drives heart looping in vertebrates”. Nature 549, 86-90 (2017).   A fundamental aspect of vertebrates is their external bilateral symmetry, which has to some extent shaped evolutionary success. Not only is beauty associated with symmetry, enhancing an individual’s chance of mating but[…]

Gone today, hair tomorrow? Changes in dermal papilla cell number drive hair thinning and loss.

Posted by on May 28th, 2013

  Over the course of a lifetime, each hair follicle makes a series of new hairs, temporarily ceasing hair production before beginning again anew.  This has focused attention on the epithelial stem cells that periodically renew the follicle and regenerate the progenitor cells that form the hair shaft.  Between the cachet of stem cells and[…]

Transparent mouse embryos and hematopoietic cell clusters

Posted by on November 8th, 2010

I was lucky in graduate school and my postdoctoral research—I was a microscopist working on a transparent organism (C. elegans).  Some microscopists don’t have that luxury, but have developed amazing techniques in order to visualize development in organisms such as mice.  In the November 1 issue of Development, Yokomizo and Dzierzak use a technique that[…]