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Displaying posts with the tag: muscle [Clear Filter]

Lab Technician University of Utah

Posted by on June 4th, 2018

Looking to conduct research in molecular biology and genetics? We are looking for a lab technician to assist in research on muscle stem cells, development, regeneration, disease, and evolution. More details about our research can be found at http://www.kardonlab.org/. Technician will assist in management of a mouse colony as well as conduct supervised research (leading to[…]

Using human development to improve myogenesis from human pluripotent stem cells

Posted by on February 21st, 2018

A discussion of our recent paper: Hicks et al., ERBB3 and NGFR mark a distinct skeletal muscle progenitor cell in human development and hPSCs. Nature Cell Biology, January 1 2018   Approaching the problem of muscle disease with cell replacement therapy We will all be affected by a muscle wasting disease in our lifetime. The[…]

BSMB/BSDB Joint meeting – The Musculoskeletal System: from development to disease

Posted by on September 11th, 2014

BSMB/BSDB Joint meeting – The Musculoskeletal System: from development to disease 1st -3rd September 2014, University of East Anglia The first joint meeting of the BSMB and BSDB was, in our opinion, a great success. The meeting was held over three days and was packed with brilliant science from areas of musculoskeletal research from the[…]

Repulsive signals: bad breath, rude manners, and ephrin ligands

Posted by on December 7th, 2011

Satellite cells are muscle stem cells that regenerate injured muscle (remember this earlier post?).  They are highly motile cells that may be able to travel in order to repair injured muscle far away, and a recent paper in Development describes the role of Eph/ephrin signaling in satellite cell motility and patterning. One of the most[…]

Satellite cells muscle their way into the stem cell spotlight

Posted by on September 8th, 2011

Researchers have long known about regeneration of injured muscles, and have debated about the exact source of the muscle stem cells that perform this amazing feat.  A group of papers in a recent issue of Development shine a stem cell spotlight on satellite cells. Following injury, skeletal muscles are regenerated by muscle stem cells, but[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 2)

Posted by on December 21st, 2010

Boning up on stem cell Igf2-P2 function The insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/insulin signalling pathway regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, aging and life span. During embryonic development, transcription of the mouse and human Igf2 gene is tightly regulated by four alternative promoters whose specific roles are unclear. Now, Sylvie Nathalie Hardouin and colleagues reveal that the transcriptional[…]