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Displaying posts with the tag: neural-crest [Clear Filter]

Biotagging: Behind the scenes (and beyond)

Posted by on May 16th, 2017

“It finally got accepted!”, fol­­lowed by “It’s finally out!” about a month later. I am certain this ‘finally’ feeling about their paper is very familiar to those well-acquainted with the peer review process, and it was no different for our recently published Resource article. The ‘biotagging paper’, as we call it within the Sauka-Spengler lab,[…]

Post-doctoral position in Skeletal Evo-Devo: Canada

Posted by on October 28th, 2016

A post-doctoral position is available in the Franz-Odendaal Bone Development Lab to study the developmental basis of the vertebrate ocular skeleton in a comparative context. Highly motivated and independent individuals with excellent interpersonal skills are encouraged to apply. The successful applicant will take a key role in our research program which spans evo-devo, developmental genetics[…]

Postdoctoral position in Skeletal Development: Nova Scotia, Canada

Posted by on September 19th, 2016

A post-doctoral position is available in the Franz-Odendaal Bone Development Lab to study the developmental basis of the vertebrate ocular skeleton in a comparative context. Highly motivated and independent individuals with excellent interpersonal skills are encouraged to apply. The successful applicant will take a key role in our research program which interests spans evo-devo, developmental[…]

Revisiting the classics: coupling embryology with genomics to alter cell fate

Posted by on July 13th, 2016

Comment on “Reprogramming of avian neural crest axial identity and cell fate“, Science 352, 1570-1573, (2016). Marcos Simoes-Costa, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University Marianne Bronner, Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology   In the 19th century, most embryologists (i.e. precursors to developmental biologists) accepted the germ layer theory[…]

From our sister journals- April 2016

Posted by on April 29th, 2016

Here is some developmental biology related content from other journals published by The Company of Biologists.           New neural crest EMT reporter Stewart and colleagues describe a novel neural crest EMT reporter for rapid in vivo drug screening in zebrafish. They use to identify a small-molecule EMT inhibitor that blocks this process by activating retinoic[…]

Interview with Beddington medal winner Elena Scarpa

Posted by on April 21st, 2016

Every year, the British Society for Developmental Biology (BSDB) awards the Beddington Medal to the best PhD thesis in developmental biology. The 2016 award went to Elena Scarpa, who did her PhD with Roberto Mayor at University College London (UCL). We caught up with Elena at the BSCB/BSDB Spring meeting, and we asked her about[…]

From our sister journals- March 2016

Posted by on March 18th, 2016

Here is some developmental biology related content from other journals published by The Company of Biologists.           Drosophila as a model to study human disease The latest issue of Disease Models & Mechanisms highlights the translational impact of Drosophila research. In this issue, Moulton and Letsou review several Drosophila models of human inborn errors of[…]

Mouse-human neural crest chimeras: Not only a matter of black and white

Posted by on February 25th, 2016

The neural crest arises between neural and non-neural ectoderm and represents a somatic cell type with unique properties of multipotency. The neural crest cells (NCCs) migrate throughout the body and differentiate into a diverse array of cell types and tissues including the peripheral nervous system, enteric and sensory nervous system, Schwann cells, skin melanocytes, as[…]

Migratory neuronal progenitors in Tunicates provide insights into Neural Crest evolution

Posted by on December 24th, 2015

Tunicates are the invertebrates most closely related to us, forming a monophyletic clade with the vertebrates, known as Olfactores. Tunicates, often erroneously referred to as “urochordates” (a junior synonym and thus a taxonomically invalid term), have revealed many insights into the development and evolution of chordate- or vertebrate-specific tissues and organs, such as the notochord,[…]

Animal models for studying neural crest development: is the mouse different?

Posted by on April 28th, 2015

In the latest issue of Development, Elias Barriga, Paul Trainor, Marianne Bronner and Roberto Mayor have contributed a Spotlight article that discusses conserved and non-conserved aspects of neural crest development across vertebrates, and highlights potential concerns or caveats regarding the use of the mouse for the analysis of early neural crest development. The piece raises a number[…]