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Displaying posts with the tag: pluripotency [Clear Filter]

The people behind the papers – Anjali Rao & Carole LaBonne

Posted by on August 9th, 2018

The neural crest is a progenitor population with the capacity to contribute to all vertebrate germ layers. The transcription factor and signalling pathway activity underlying this remarkable pluripotency have been well studied, but the role of the epigenetic state is less well understood. A new paper in Development examines the role of histone acetylation in regulating[…]

Postdoctoral Position in Pluripotency, Signaling and Epigenetics, Washington University School of Medicine

Posted by on July 13th, 2018

A postdoctoral position is available in the lab of Thorold Theunissen at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, USA (theunissenlab.wustl.edu). Our research program is dedicated to exploring the molecular regulation of pluripotent stem cells and their applications in regenerative medicine. We have developed methods for inducing and maintaining human embryonic stem cells[…]

BSDB Gurdon Summer Studentship Report (19)

Posted by on December 1st, 2017

Established  by the British Society for Developmental Biology in 2014, The Gurdon/The Company of Biologists Summer Studentship scheme provides financial support to allow highly motivated undergraduate students an opportunity to engage in practical research during their summer vacation. Each year, ten successful applicants spend eight weeks in the research laboratories of their choices, and the feedback[…]

Laboratory Research Scientist

Posted by on September 20th, 2017

OVERVIEW   We are seeking a highly motivated and collaborative Laboratory Research Scientist in the area of human embryology and stem cell biology to join Dr. Kathy Niakan’s laboratory. The lab has identified several signalling pathways that may be operational in the human embryo to regulate the establishment or maintenance of pluripotent epiblast progenitor cells[…]

Mitotic Bookmarking by Esrrb: an unexplored mechanism for implementing cell fate choices?

Posted by on November 18th, 2016

  The story behind our recent paper (Festuccia et al., Nature Cell Biology 2016) started with a serendipitous observation made in a small room of the ISCR (Institute for Stem Cell Research), which at the time was still located in the King’s Buildings campus, south of town in my beloved Edinburgh. I was imaging a[…]

An interview with José Silva

Posted by on November 5th, 2015

This interview first featured in the Journal of Cell Science and is part of their interview series Cell Scientists to Watch.   José Silva studied biology at the University of Porto, before leaving Portugal to obtain a PhD degree at Imperial College London in the laboratory of Neil Brockdorff. He did his postdoc with Austin Smith[…]

Towards a synthetic embryo

Posted by on September 24th, 2014

Waddington, whose writings on the epigenetic landscape continue to influence developmental biology to this day, called the developing embryo “the most intriguing object that nature has to offer”(Waddington, 1966). The mechanisms of pattern formation and morphogenesis have fascinated biologists for centuries. One question that is difficult to answer is what are the minimal requirements for[…]

GATA6 and the power of single cells

Posted by on May 29th, 2014

Any mammal who celebrated Mother’s Day earlier this month realizes how important mothers are for us and the tight bond between them and their children. Forget clean shirts and packed lunch every day; for us developmental biologists, there is no better reflection of this bond than the extraembryonic membranes that support the growth of the[…]

Senescent cell rejuvenation – you(r cells) are never too old for pluripotency!

Posted by on December 3rd, 2011

  In 2007, a group let by Takahashi and Yamanaka from Kyoto University successfully generated pluripotent cells from human adult fibroblasts.  They were able to induce a pluripotent state in differentiated cells by introducing four transcription factors, OCT4, SOX2, c-MYC, and KLF4 by retroviral infection, hence the name “induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).”  Although the[…]

In Development This Week (Vol. 138, Issue 22)

Posted by on October 25th, 2011

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development: The skin-healing touch of Lhx2 Skin repair after injury involves the recruitment of undifferentiated progenitor cells from nearby hair follicles (HFs) into the regenerating epidermis. The bulge and the secondary hair germ of HFs contain distinct populations of epithelial stem cells, and now Vladimir Botchkarev[…]