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Matching neurons to limbs: an evolutionary perspective on motor system development

Posted by on February 24th, 2017

Comment on “Divergent Hox Coding and Evasion of Retinoid Signaling Specifies Motor Neurons Innervating Digit Muscles” Neuron 93, 1–14, February 22, 2017. Alana I. Mendelsohn, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Jeremy S. Dasen, Department of Neuroscience, NYU Thomas M. Jessell, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University[…]

Postdoctoral researcher position in developmental/stem cell biology-University of Sheffield

Posted by on October 6th, 2016

We are currently seeking an independent and motivated scientist to join the research group led by Dr Anestis Tsakiridis (https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/cscb/tsakiridis). His work focuses on dissecting the molecular basis of cell fate decisions in the developing embryo and aims to exploit this knowledge for disease-modelling and regenerative medicine applications. The group is particularly interested in the biology of neuromesodermal progenitors[…]

Replicating spinal cord development with microfluidics

Posted by on July 5th, 2016

Unraveling Development Embryonic development is a complex and regulated spatiotemporal ensemble of signaling cues that control cell differentiation. Most of what we now know comes from experimenting directly on embryos. This provides biological realism, but involves a sea of uncontrolled/unobserved variables that sometimes obscures the basic underlying mechanisms. More recently, in vitro models, based on[…]

Researchers grow ‘seed’ of spinal cord tissue in a dish

Posted by on September 3rd, 2014

Medical Research Council (MRC) scientists have for the first time managed to turn stem cells into the specialised cells that go on to form spinal cord, muscle and bone tissue in the growing embryo. Their discovery could lead to a new way of studying degenerative conditions such as spinal muscular atrophy, which affects the nerve[…]

In the new issue of Development, 137 (17)…

Posted by on August 10th, 2010

The Bicoid gradient, epigenetic control of BMP signalling, haematopoietic stem cells and more…here are the highlights from the current issue of Development: The Bicoid gradient gets into shape without nuclei Morphogen gradients provide key positional information during embryogenesis but how they are established is not well understood. A gradient of the transcription factor Bicoid is[…]