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Displaying posts with the tag: stem-cells [Clear Filter]

Clones in bones – Looking for international PhD applicant at Monash University

Posted by on February 13th, 2019

International PhD student opportunity – Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute. Monash University Studying the clonal dynamics of cartilage stem cells during normal and perturbed bone growth   Looking for an international PhD applicant to be enrolled in Monash University doctoral program under the supervision of Dr Alberto Rosello-Diez (http://www.rosellodiezlab.com and https://www.armi.org.au/research-leadership/rosello-diez-group). Long bones grow by forming[…]

CRISPR babies: a view from the centre of the storm

Posted by on February 8th, 2019

This article by Robin Lovell-Badge, published this week in Development, gives a front-row view of the CRISPR babies scandal from last year. When the story broke, we collated reactions from the field – be sure to check them out too.  Towards the end of November 2018, news broke that the Chinese researcher He Jiankui had[…]

Improving the visibility of developmental biology: time for induction and specification

Posted by on February 6th, 2019

This Spotlight article by Len Zon originally appeared in Development as part of our ‘Advocating developmental biology‘ campaign. We’d love to hear what you think about Len’s ideas. Developmental biology is a prominent field that has captured the imagination of many scientists. Over the years, research in the area has seen a steady number of[…]

The people behind the papers – Dongbo Shi and Thomas Greb

Posted by on January 19th, 2019

This interview, the 56th in our series, was recently published in Development Radial growth in plants is driven by proliferating cells in the cambium that give rise to the vascular tissues of xylem and phloem, and increases plant girth. However, the identity and dynamics of the stem cells that drive this crucial process remain poorly understood. A[…]

The people behind the papers – Salome Stierli and Alison Lloyd

Posted by on January 17th, 2019

This interview, the 54th in our series, was published in Development last year In contrast to nerves in the central nervous system, peripheral nerves are highly regenerative following injury. Regeneration is critically dependent on Schwann cells, the main glial cell type of the peripheral nervous system, but whether an additional stem cell or progenitor population also contributes[…]

Postdoc in computational single-cell biology in planarians

Posted by on January 15th, 2019

The Solana lab is looking for a postdoctoral computational researcher to work on single-cell transcriptomic and genomics of planarian stem cell differentiation. Our lab just started in Oxford Brookes University. We are currently three lab members but we will expand soon. We recently obtained funding from the MRC to expand our single-cell analysis of planarian[…]

From stem cells to human development: Meeting report

Posted by on November 15th, 2018

In  September, Development held the third of its highly successful series of meetings focusing on human developmental biology. Here at the Node we ran a competition to find a meeting reporter who would share their experiences of the meeting in exchange for free registration. Competition winner Antonio Barral Gil, a PhD student in Miguel Manzanares’ Lab at[…]

Clone Wars: A New Model

Posted by on October 1st, 2018

From the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine blog.   Stem cell turnover and tissue maintenance is a stochastic process. This means that a randomly occurring mutation has an unknown chance of becoming fixed and spreading within a tissue. Clonal mutations have been observed in apparently healthy tissue, increase in frequency with age and –[…]

The people behind the papers – Guillaume Blin, Manuel Thery & Sally Lowell

Posted by on September 21st, 2018

During early mouse development, a series of signalling interactions breaks the symmetry of the egg cylinder, spatially organising the embryo into territories that define the future axes of the body. Symmetry breaking can also be observed in embryonic stem cell (ESC) colonies cultured on micropatterned substrates, which thus provide a powerful system to test the[…]

The people behind the papers – Anjali Rao & Carole LaBonne

Posted by on August 9th, 2018

The neural crest is a progenitor population with the capacity to contribute to all vertebrate germ layers. The transcription factor and signalling pathway activity underlying this remarkable pluripotency have been well studied, but the role of the epigenetic state is less well understood. A new paper in Development examines the role of histone acetylation in regulating[…]