the community site for and by developmental biologists

An interview with Margaret Buckingham: President of the French Society of Developmental Biology

Posted by on January 27th, 2011

(This interview originally appeared in Development) Margaret Buckingham is Professor in the Department of Developmental Biology at the Pasteur Institute in Paris and she is also the current President of the French Society of Developmental Biology (Société Française de Biologie du Développement, SFBD). We spoke with her about the role of the SFBD and about[…]

Ernest McCulloch 1926-2011

Posted by on January 27th, 2011

Last week (January 19), stem cell pioneer Ernest McCulloch died at the age of 84. Together with James Till, McCulloch discovered stem cells in the 1960s. For their work, the pair won the Gairdner Award in 1969 and the Lasker Award in 2005. McCulloch was professor emeritus of the University of Toronto and former Director[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 4)

Posted by on January 26th, 2011

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development: New moves in haematopoiesis: rumba and samba Vertebrate haematopoiesis relies on a pool of haemetopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) that can self-renew and differentiate into all haematopoietic lineages. But what are the molecular mechanisms that regulate this process? Here, Zilong Wen and co-workers (p. 619)[…]

A career in publishing: a developing story

Posted by on January 25th, 2011

In a follow up to Eva’s first post in our alternative careers series about how a research background in developmental biology can lead to a career path that lies outside of research, I hope that my description here of how I made the move from a PhD in developmental genetics to a career in publishing[…]

Just because it looks like a duct, doesn’t mean it is the duct

Posted by on January 25th, 2011

The Node’s staff has kindly given me the opportunity to write a background piece, placing into context the results of our studies described in the paper, “Sox9+ ductal cells are multipotent progenitors throughout development but do not produce new endocrine cells in the normal or injured adult pancreas” (released today in Development; http://dev.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/dev.056499). For many[…]

Double bill: Bringin’ Stickleback / Bad Project

Posted by on January 24th, 2011

Is this Monday not quite giving you the results you were hoping for? Cheer up with a few science music videos. This one, “Bad Project”, is being emailed around rapidly among scientists worldwide, so there’s a good chance you’ve already seen it. If not, it’s worth a watch for the costumes (made of lab supplies!)[…]

Skip your postdoc?

Posted by on January 20th, 2011

A friend of mine went straight from his PhD in computational (pharmaco)chemistry to an investigator position, and I have heard an unconfirmed second-hand story of one other person recently making this transition in a life science related area. But by and large, most PI jobs require that you have done at least one postdoc, and[…]

Conference announcement: Advances in stem cell research: Development, Regeneration & Disease in Paris, France

Posted by on January 19th, 2011

Announcement for the Advances in stem cell research: Development, Regeneration & Disease conference at the Pasteur Institute, Paris, April 6-8, 2011.

RNAi in the Nucleus ~ It’s no longer limited to the cytoplasm

Posted by on January 18th, 2011

Hot off the press from the holidays is an article from PNAS that’s worth a gander if you’re into RNAi. We know RNAi associated with epigenetics is possible in the nucleus (Somehow, siRNAs could trigger the methylation and silencing of genes in the nucleus.) However, one soy bean group was able to provide evidence for[…]

Citing Data

Posted by on January 17th, 2011

I just got back from attending two meetings about academia and the internet – one in person and the second, in true internet style, virtually. Both meetings at one point or another discussed the growing trend toward archiving and citing data itself (on top of citing the papers written based on analysis of the data).[…]