the community site for and by developmental biologists

SDB at the USA Science and Engineering Festival

Posted by on November 18th, 2010

The Society for Developmental Biology participated in the first USA Science and Engineering Festival held October 10-24, 2010 in Washington, DC.  SDB sponsored four separate events throughout the festival in an effort to share the field of developmental biology with the community.  This included a teacher workshop based on the BioEYES K-12 science education program,[…]

2010 Gairdner Awards

Posted by on November 17th, 2010

The Gairdner Awards is Canada’s foremost international award, recognizing medical researchers for their work which has contributed significantly to improving quality of life.  There are five awardees each year and 76 of the 298 Gairdner awardees to date have gone on to win the Nobel Prize. Lectures celebrating scientific excellence in medical research take place[…]

Rock Stars of Science

Posted by on November 17th, 2010

Glamour, fame, red carpets, flashing lights. It’s not what you usually get as a top scientist, but why not? Why should overnight reality TV stars get more attention than people who spent years researching how the world works? This lack of attention to the important role of scientists was a driving force behind the second[…]

Cell death – the video

Posted by on November 12th, 2010

Cold Spring Harbor has just published a new book on cell death by Doug Green, a larger-than-life character who will be familiar to anyone who’s ever been to an apoptosis conference. In this video, Doug talks about the apoptosis machinery and explains why cell death is critical during development. (No Ratings Yet) Loading…

Student associations

Posted by on November 11th, 2010

I’m Nish, a 3rd year PhD student in Kate Storey’s lab at the University of Dundee. Over the past year, I’ve been involved in running PiCLS, the PhD association here at the College of Life Sciences in Dundee. Unfortunate acronyms aside, it has the most interesting year of my PhD so far. I thought I’d[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 137, Issue 23)

Posted by on November 9th, 2010

The current issue of Development is now online! Here are the research highlights: Klf5: a multifaceted regulator of cell fate Kruppel-like transcription factors (Klfs) induce and maintain pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and Klf4 is one of the factors used to create reprogrammed iPS cells. The role of Klfs in the specification of the[…]

Transparent mouse embryos and hematopoietic cell clusters

Posted by on November 8th, 2010

I was lucky in graduate school and my postdoctoral research—I was a microscopist working on a transparent organism (C. elegans).  Some microscopists don’t have that luxury, but have developed amazing techniques in order to visualize development in organisms such as mice.  In the November 1 issue of Development, Yokomizo and Dzierzak use a technique that[…]

the Node update – writers, thumbs, polls, and emails

Posted by on November 8th, 2010

Writing for the Node Have any of the entries on the Node inspired you to add something yourself? Go ahead! We’d like to remind you that you don’t need to ask permission to write for the Node. You also don’t need to wait for us to ask you to write something – although we might.[…]

SfN meeting: a 21st century event

Posted by on November 3rd, 2010

The annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience kicks off in San Diego at the end of next week, and there are a lot of interesting updates even for people who, like me, are sadly *not* attending. First of all, if you’re planning to go but haven’t yet registered, you can register on site, but[…]

A primer or two in collegiality and mutual benefit

Posted by on November 2nd, 2010

Who wants to reinvent the wheel? Resources for finding or judging the worth of PCR primers, particularly for quantitation or amplification of cDNA.