the community site for and by developmental biologists

Matching neurons to limbs: an evolutionary perspective on motor system development

Posted by on February 24th, 2017

Comment on “Divergent Hox Coding and Evasion of Retinoid Signaling Specifies Motor Neurons Innervating Digit Muscles” Neuron 93, 1–14, February 22, 2017. Alana I. Mendelsohn, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Jeremy S. Dasen, Department of Neuroscience, NYU Thomas M. Jessell, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University[…]

Postdoctoral researcher or experienced research technicians interested in spine and cartilage development and disease research

Posted by on February 22nd, 2017

Positions are available in the Gray Laboratory within the Dell Pediatrics Research Institute at University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School. The primary research focus of these positions will be to utilize novel zebrafish and cartilage cell culture models to study the genetic susceptibilities of spine and cartilage diseases.  One of the major focuses[…]

Send your nominations for BSDB committee members by 7 March

Posted by on February 22nd, 2017

The BSDB invites nominations for three new committee members, who will commence their 5 year term in October 2017 replacing three members who will retire this year. Committee members are required to (make every attempt to) attend two committee meetings per year, one of which coincides with the annual BSDB Spring Meeting.   All nominations[…]

The people behind the papers #15

Posted by on February 21st, 2017

Conjoined twins have fascinated biologists for centuries. In twins joined at the thorax, left-right patterning is disrupted, but only in one half of the right hand twins. Today’s paper, from this week’s issue of Current Biology, tackles this enigmatic phenomenon using Xenopus, and reveals that laterality in conjoined twins is determined by cilia-driven leftward flow.[…]

Why are geneticists measuring the webbing between mouse embryo fingers?

Posted by on February 21st, 2017

A new paper published in Journal of Anatomy shows that measuring the amount of inter-digital webbing in mouse embryos between 14 and 15 days gestation is the best way to find out their exact stage of development. So why is this important to a geneticist? If we want to discover a causal link between a gene[…]

Seeing the world through fresh eyes

Posted by on February 20th, 2017

There are many different structures in our eyes that work in conjunction to allow us to see. These structures are strikingly similar between different species, from zebrafish to humans. The growth of ocular tissues must be tightly controlled in order to maintain the correct eye size and shape that allow us to see. This tight[…]

ISSCR 2017 Award Winners Announced

Posted by on February 16th, 2017

Each year the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) recognises the stem cell researchers driving the field forward in their annual awards. You can learn more about the awards here, and watch short videos of the awardees discussing their work below.   Elaine Fuchs McEwen Award for Innovation    Jayaraj Rajagopal Dr. Susan Lim Outstanding Young[…]

The people behind the papers #14

Posted by on February 15th, 2017

Embryonic stem cells express genes necessary for self-renewal, and also ‘prime’ lineage-specific genes which stay silent until differentiation; the molecular players and pathways that govern the timely gene expression are still being delineated. Today’s paper comes from the most recent issue of Development and reveals a role for the histone demethylase Jmjd2c in gene activation in stem cell[…]

Meet Our Scientists VIDEO: Marco Milán: “To study how cells communicate with each other, perhaps the best model organism is the fruit fly”

Posted by on February 15th, 2017

The “Meet Our Scientists” video entitled “Our relative the fly” presents the research performed by Marco Millán on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of tissue growth during normal development, tissue homeostasis, and tumorigenesis.     Marco Milán, ICREA research professor, leads the Development and Growth Control Laboratory at IRB Barcelona. In the[…]

Gene editing stem cells with CRISPR could help understand brain tumours

Posted by on February 14th, 2017

This report written by Justine Alford and highlighting a recent Development paper originally appeared on the CRUK Science Blog.      Over the past 12 months, the acronym CRISPR has been popping up in science news left, right and centre. And for good reason. Hailed as a revolution in genetic engineering, this molecular toolbox lets[…]