the community site for and by developmental biologists

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 1)

Posted by on December 7th, 2010

The first issue of 2011 is out now…here are the highlights: Geminin control of lineage commitment The transition between pluripotency and multi-lineage commitment during early embryogenesis must be closely regulated to ensure correct spatial and temporal patterning of the embryo. But what regulates this crucial transition? According to Kristen Kroll and co-workers, part of the[…]

Echinoderm development on film

Posted by on December 6th, 2010

“I also here salute the echinoderms as a noble group especially designed to puzzle the zoologist.” Libbie Hyman, 1955 Echinoderms are fascinating creatures. They have extensive regenerative capabilities, a mutable connective tissue that dynamically (and deliberately) changes its stiffness, and a complex system of hydraulic canals involved in the circulation of internal fluids and locomotion.[…]

Keeping up with the Node

Posted by on December 6th, 2010

Like more than 500 million people in the world, the Node is now on Facebook . Our foray into Facebook was slightly overshadowed by the British royal family doing exactly the same thing a few weeks earlier, but we can guarantee you that our page will contain far more developmental biology. We’re using our Facebook[…]

Developmental biology art from Japan

Posted by on December 1st, 2010

The RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology has released the images for a series of postcards under a creative commons license. The images picture a wide range of both common and uncommon model organisms, all in a Japanese paper art style.

Travelling Fellowships

Posted by on November 29th, 2010

Over the past months, we’ve seen a few posts on the Node from people who spent a few months working in labs abroad. All of them were funded by a Development travelling fellowship. The next deadline for these fellowships is coming up on December 31st, and Development would like to encourage you to apply. To[…]

International experience

Posted by on November 26th, 2010

Hello, I am Terry Jackson, a 6th year PhD student in Genetics and Genomics at Duke University which is located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. I am working on my degree in the lab of Dr. Philip Benfey whose research focuses on identifying transcription factors in the root of Arabidopsis thaliana. I am pleased to[…]

An interview with Patrick Tam

Posted by on November 25th, 2010

(This interview by Kathryn Senior originally appeared in Development on November 23, 2010) Patrick Tam’s research is focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of body patterning during mouse development. He agreed to be interviewed by Development to talk about his interest in mouse development, new concepts in gastrulation, X-linked diseases and his dream of[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 137, Issue 24)

Posted by on November 23rd, 2010

Pak1-ing a punch in lumen formation The generation and maintenance of correct lumen size and shape is essential for the function of tubular organs. Now, Monn Monn Myat and co-workers report that p21-activated kinase (Pak1) plays a novel role during lumen formation in Drosophila embryonic salivary glands (see p. 4177). The researchers show that Pak1[…]

V International Meeting of the LASDB

Posted by on November 20th, 2010

Being at the end of the planet Earth and organizing an international meeting is not easy. Even harder is to prepare and hold a course intended for an international audience. But the organizing committee of the Fifth International Meeting of the Latin American Society for Developmental Biology, together with the Society for Developmental Biology, managed[…]

A win for Developmental Biology in Japan

Posted by on November 19th, 2010

Science is held pretty highly in Japan. The country has produced 15 Nobel Prize winners in the science disciplines, including two in the field of chemistry this year. But perhaps a little less in the international press’ limelight is Dr. Yoshiki Sasai, winner of the Osaka Science Prize. This honor is like the Japanese version[…]