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The people behind the papers #13

Posted by on February 8th, 2017

Radial glial cells are multipotent progenitors in the developing vertebrate brain. At their apical interface with the ventricular cavity around which the brain forms, they bear a primary cilium, a signalling and sensory organelle crucial for proper brain development. Today’s paper, from a recent issue of Development, addresses the link between these primary cilia and brain morphogenesis.[…]

D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form – 100 Years On and Still Growing!

Posted by on February 7th, 2017

“For the harmony of the world is made manifest in Form and Number, and the heart and soul and all the poetry of Natural Philosophy are embodied in the concept of mathematical beauty.”     D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form, which celebrates its centenary this year, is one of the key works at the[…]

New data reveals how gene knockouts affect whole embryo gene expression

Posted by on February 7th, 2017

New DMDD data released on Expression Atlas reveals the effect of single gene knockouts on the expression of all other genes in the mouse genome. The gene expression profiles of 11 knockout lines have been derived from whole embryos harvested at E9.5, and the results can be compared with wild-type controls using an interactive online[…]

This month on the Node and beyond

Posted by on February 7th, 2017

January was a productive month on the Node, with a variety of developmental biology content from the lab bench and beyond.   Research We heard from the authors of a bunch of recent papers, including Ripla Arora on her recent Development paper on imaging the implanting embryo and uterine environment in 3D, and Kyle Martin[…]

From our sister journals – December & January

Posted by on February 6th, 2017

Here we highlight some developmental biology related content from other journals published by The Company of Biologists. JCS kicked off 2017 with a Special Issue relevant to many developmental biologists: 3D cell biology. It’s packed full of commentaries, interviews, research articles and techniques, and well worth a browse.   Brian Stramer of King’s College, London, a big[…]

January in preprints

Posted by on February 3rd, 2017

Our latest monthly trawl for developmental biology (and other cool) preprints. See June’s introductory post for background, and let us know if we missed anything   2017 started where 2016 had left off, with an number of preprints covering most corners of developmental biology, plus more relevant work from related fields. Looking at the list below,[…]

Forgotten classics: Cut and paste embryology

Posted by on February 2nd, 2017

Hörstadius, S. 1939. The mechanics of sea urchin development, studied by operative methods. Biological Reviews 14(2):132-179. Recommended by Bob Goldstein, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill   Sven Hörstadius stands alongside the likes of Boveri, Spemann, Mangold and Driesch as a giant of experimental embryology in the first half of the twentieth century. While[…]

Diversity is a good thing: coordination of collective cell migration in angiogenesis

Posted by on February 2nd, 2017

Comment on “Asymmetric division coordinates collective cell migration in angiogenesis” Nat Cell Bio, 18 (12), 1292-1301, (2016).   Holly E. Lovegrove & Guilherme Costa Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, Uk   Collective cell migration is involved in many biological processes. In particular it is required to build new tissues[…]

The people behind the papers #12

Posted by on February 1st, 2017

The brown alga Ectocarpus has emerged as a model system for the evolution of muticellularity. Today’s paper, from the current issue of Development, investigates the role and evolutionary history of a gene implicated in Ectocarpus development. We caught up with first author Nicolas Macaisne and supervisor J. Mark Cock of the Station Biologique de Roscoff in Brittany.     Mark, can you[…]

A Crumby affair: Cell ingression during gastrulation

Posted by on January 31st, 2017

Comment on “Crumbs2 promotes cell ingression during the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition at gastrulation” Ramkumar N, Omelchenko T, Silva-Gagliardi NF, McGlade CJ, Wijnholds J, Anderson KV. Nat Cell Biol. 2016 Dec;18(12):1281-1291   “It is not birth, marriage, or death, but gastrulation, which is truly the most important time in your life.” Lewis Wolpert (1986)   Aptly stated by Wolpert, gastrulation is the fundamental process[…]