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Laboratory and lecture course by top-notch Developmental Biologists in Quintay-Chile (January 2020) for Latin American and International applicants

Posted by on July 4th, 2019

This new version of the Quintay2020 course is organized with the collaboration of the Marine Biology Laboratory (MBL, Woods Hole, USA). We invite students to submit their application before the deadline (31st July 2019). At the end of the Quintay2020 course, the two best students will receive a prize, which consists in a place to[…]

The 2019 North of England Cell Biology Forum

Posted by on July 2nd, 2019

This annual 1-day symposium brings together cell biologists from the North of England. There is a full day of talks and a poster session where junior scientists are encouraged to present their work. PhD students and post-docs are invited to apply for oral and/or poster presentations; prizes will be awarded on the day. Date: Thursday,[…]

A Poetic Observation of Stem Cell Research

Posted by on June 28th, 2019

A cinematographer, shadowed scientists in their everyday work provides us with a glimpse into the incredible beauty of science. (No Ratings Yet) Loading…

Embryonic hydraulics triumphs

Posted by on June 26th, 2019

In this article I share with you a more personal, chronological account of how our story unfolds (recently published in Nature), and highlight some key events and insights that help guide the direction of the study, which are not described in the publication. Readers are welcome to refer to the publication for more technical details.[…]

Data manipulation? It’s normal(ization)!

Posted by on June 25th, 2019

In a previous blog, I have highlighted several ways to visualize the cell-to-cell heterogeneity from time-lapse imaging data. However, I have ignored that data is often rescaled in a way that reduces variability. For time-lapse imaging data, it is common to set the initial fluorescence intensity to 1 (or 100%). As a consequence, any changes[…]

Beyond morphogen signaling

Posted by on June 25th, 2019

By Dörthe Jülich & Scott Holley   Organizers pattern surrounding tissues via secreted morphogens that specify different cell states as a function of concentration. Wolpert’s French Flag model is commonly used to describe how morphogen gradients specify different fates. Our recent study integrates tail organizer signaling with control of morphogenesis during vertebrate body elongation (Das,[…]

The Pros and Cons of having an ELN: What I’ve learned from my time in a wet lab

Posted by on June 24th, 2019

With its growing adoption in the laboratory, an electronic lab notebook, or ELN, can be a useful tool to aid research, whether in academia or industry. But I found there is limited information on the practicalities of an ELN in a wet lab. Wet labs are a messy business, so strict guidelines are put in[…]

The people behind the papers – Amsha Proag and Magali Suzanne

Posted by on June 24th, 2019

This interview, the 65th in our series, was recently published in Development During development, mechanical forces sculpt tissues into myriad forms. Actomyosin contractility generated within the cell has an increasingly appreciated role in this process, but how tissue forces relate to the physical properties of the extracellular matrix is still poorly understood, particularly at longer time scales[…]

Non-zero baselines: the good, the bad, and the ugly

Posted by on June 20th, 2019

Of all the charts being ridiculed at WTFviz, many get shamed for their lack of a zero-baseline. When teaching DataViz, zero-baselines are invariably a topic of debate. The rules about zero baselines are necessary are often unclear. Therefore, let’s quickly recap. Bar charts: always show zero When we ecnode amounts by length, as done in[…]

Genetics Unzipped podcast: Genetics by numbers

Posted by on June 20th, 2019

We’re unravelling the story of the double helix, cracking the triplet code, and sketching out a Punnett square.