the community site for and by developmental biologists

Cells in Evolutionary Biology

Posted by on September 2nd, 2018

Cells in Evolutionary Biology: Translating Genotypes into Phenotypes – Past, Present, Future 1st Edition Brian K. Hall, Sally A. Moody   This book is the first in a projected series on Evolutionary Cell Biology. https://www.crcpress.com/Cells-in-Evolutionary-Biology-Translating-Genotypes-into-Phenotypes—Past/Hall-Moody/p/book/9781498787864 The intent of this book is to demonstrate the essential role of cellular mechanisms in transforming the genotype into the phenotype[…]

The Company of Biologists Travelling Fellowships

Posted by on August 30th, 2018

The Company of Biologists’ journals – Development, Journal of Cell Science, Journal of Experimental Biology and Disease Models & Mechanisms – offer Travelling Fellowships of up to £2,500 or currency equivalent to graduate students and post-doctoral researchers wishing to make collaborative visits to other laboratories. These are designed to offset the cost of travel and other expenses. There is no restriction on[…]

Why We Need More Women in Academia: An Undergraduate Interested in Developmental Biology

Posted by on August 28th, 2018

For some scientists, the decision to pursue a research career stems from a youthful curiosity for the natural world that gradually builds over many years. Whereas in others, there is single moment when they realize that their desired future involved research. My interest is a mix of both – I decided I was going to[…]

A day in the life of a colonial tunicate laboratory

Posted by on August 28th, 2018

Have you heard of an animal that can lose most of its body tissues and the remnant tissues aggregate to regenerate the lost parts and recovery its original form? Do you know an animal that can quickly colonize marine surfaces by asexual reproduction, just like weed would in terrestrial environments ? Do you know an[…]

DUCTS IN THE PANCREAS FORM SIMILAR TO RIVER BEDS

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

When people digest food, the flow of fluids and digestive enzymes to the gut is critical. Until recently, researchers had marvelled at the incredibly complex system of ducts that transports a stream of enzymes and mucus from the pancreas to the gut. Astonishingly, a research project led by Professor Grapin-Botton has revealed that the ducts[…]

Pitx2c sets the stage for gastrulation

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

In our recently published paper https://elifesciences.org/articles/34880, we report that the transcription factor Pitx2c has an unexpected role during gastrulation, where it acts cell non-autonomously to promote mesendodermal cell migration required for axis extension in zebrafish.     “It is not birth, marriage or death which is the most important time in your life, but gastrulation. –[…]

Dating with cells – finding the right match

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

It’s an age-old mystery of the heart: do opposites attract, or will like do better with like? We can now answer this pressing question, at least for Drosophila cardioblasts: cells prefer to ‘swipe right’ on a shared transcriptional profile, but the resulting relationships are stronger if there are some unattractive alternatives around to remind them[…]

Fat to the forefront of histone regulation

Posted by on August 21st, 2018

All life requires energy. For early metazoan development, demand is especially high, as the transition from a single cell to a complex, multicellular organism requires a massive energetic input. In the earliest stages of development, however, an organisms’ inability to feed poses an apparent problem: how is the energy necessary to drive development obtained? In[…]

Five wonders of the Embryology Course 2018

Posted by on August 20th, 2018

Summer of 2018 will genuinely be the summer to remember for all 24 MBL embryology students. To me, the MBL embryology 2018 course was like a wonderland full of breath-taking experimental adventures, unexpected discoveries, scientific growth and madly passionate researchers. Thus, let me take you on a journey across the five wonders of this course.[…]

On the beauty and wonder of endless forms: a reflection on Embryology Course 2018

Posted by on August 16th, 2018

There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being,[…]