the community site for and by developmental biologists

Mouse embryology

Posted by on October 30th, 2018

Practical training course March13-15, 2019 Strasbourg, France Program and registration (No Ratings Yet) Loading…

Utah Fish Conference 2018: Meeting Summary

Posted by on October 25th, 2018

The Zebrafish Interest Group at the University of Utah held its first Utah Fish Conference (UFC) on October 8, 2018. The conference was organized by pre- and post-doctoral trainees to celebrate the University’s Zebrafish Interest Group (ZIG), as well as to unite the Mountain West fish community. This 1-day event hosted over 80 attendees from[…]

Keystone Conference on Cell Competition in Development and Disease

Posted by on October 25th, 2018

Join us for the Conference on Cell Competition in Development & Disease, in Tahoe, California! February 24–28, 2019 Granlibakken Tahoe – Lake Tahoe, California, USA Cell competition is a highly conserved process that promotes the context-dependent elimination of less fit cells and stimulates growth of more fit cells during growth and homeostasis. It has long[…]

Zebrafish knock-ins swim into the mainstream

Posted by on October 25th, 2018

This Editorial by Sergey Prykhozhij and Jason Berman originally appeared in Disease Models and Mechanisms, an online Open Access sister journal to Development focusing on the use of model systems to better understand, diagnose and treat human disease. The Editorial focuses on three new papers on point mutant knock ins in zebrafish, and will thus be of interest[…]

The people behind the papers – Joe Shawky & Lance Davidson

Posted by on October 24th, 2018

The construction of complex three-dimensional tissue structures during embryogenesis requires precise control of cell and tissue mechanics. The Xenopus embryo provides a powerful tool for interrogating this relationship, as demonstrated by a recent Development paper reporting the use of tissue explants to test predictions of mechanical models. We caught up with first author and recent graduate Joseph[…]

Frog legs: they’re smarter than they look!

Posted by on October 22nd, 2018

By Sera Moon Busse Studying limb regeneration in model organisms is important for the advancement of regenerative medicine in humans. We set out to study regeneration in the hind limbs of the African Clawed Frog Xenopus laevis – this animal is able to regenerate its hind limbs very early in development, but it loses this[…]

Scaling the Fish: An L.A. Story

Posted by on October 18th, 2018

Jeff Rasmussen tells the story behind his recent paper from the Sagasti Lab in Dev Cell. This project began as an extension of my earlier postdoc work in Alvaro Sagasti’s lab investigating removal of axon debris following skin injuries in the larval zebrafish [1] and led me into scientific territory that I never anticipated. It[…]

Spider segmentation gets its SOX on!

Posted by on October 15th, 2018

There is a vast amount of information known about how some animals pattern their bodies into repeated segments, especially in the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, when compared to other arthropods, there are several characteristics that are derived in the fruit fly. It has a very short development time, a syncytium at the blastoderm stage allowing[…]

‘Chromatin-based regulation of development’ – Early-career researcher places available

Posted by on October 15th, 2018

The Company of Biologists’ Workshops provide leading experts and early career scientists from a diverse range of scientific backgrounds with a stimulating environment for the cross fertilization of interdisciplinary ideas. The April 2019 Workshop looks a treat for fans of developmental gene regulation. Co-organised by Benoit Bruneau and Joanna Wysocka, ‘Chromatin-based regulation of development‘ will bring together scientists who[…]

This month in preLights – September

Posted by on October 12th, 2018

Welcome to our monthly summary of developmental biology (and related) preLights.   It’s been almost eight months since the launch of preLights, and we are very excited about the hugely positive response from the community so far and preLights’ rapid growth – we recently reached two hundred preprint highlights! To further grow this service, we[…]