the community site for and by developmental biologists

In Development this week (Vol. 144, Issue 8)

Posted by on April 11th, 2017

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   A new niche for human HSCs Human haematopoiesis occurs at various anatomical sites throughout development, including the yolk sac, the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region, the liver, the placenta and the bone marrow. Cells marked by high expression of CD34 and low CD45 – suggestive of possible[…]

Medal & Award winners at the 2017 BSCB/BSDB/Gen Soc Spring Meeting

Posted by on April 11th, 2017

As every year, the Spring meeting was the time of awards and medals! This year, we had awardees of three societies who are listed below. For those wanting to have a look at the topics of talks and posters presented at the meeting, please download the abstract book here.   ► Medal Awards BSDB Waddington[…]

The people behind the papers: Dae Seok Eom & David Parichy

Posted by on April 7th, 2017

Macrophages are usually associated with immunity, but have increasingly appreciated functions in development and homeostasis. This week we meet the authors of a recent Science paper that identified a role for macrophages in zebrafish stripe patterning, revealing a remarkable ‘relay’ mechanism whereby macrophages help one type of cell signal to another via cytoplasmic extensions. Postdoc[…]

March in preprints

Posted by on April 6th, 2017

Our latest monthly trawl for developmental biology (and other cool) preprints. See June’s introductory post for background, and let us know if we missed anything March was (yet) another bumper month for life sciences preprints. A glance at some of the names of last authors – Daniel St. Johnston, Denise Montell, Dennis Duboule, Roberto Mayor, Fiona Watt[…]

Shaping Snapdragons

Posted by on April 4th, 2017

Have you ever wondered what makes the shapes in the animal and plant kingdom so different? We take for granted the diversity of natural shapes that surround us, from a simple pine leaf to complex orchid flower. However, they pose one of the most beautiful scientific challenges. For centuries, scientists have been fascinated by how[…]

Vote for a Development cover – Woods Hole Images 2015, Round 1

Posted by on March 30th, 2017

The Woods Hole Embryology Course, which will celebrate its 124th birthday this year, is a continual source of beautiful images (and videos) of development. Since 2011 the Node has run a competition for the community to pick the best images from a given year –  the winning pictures become immortalised as Development covers! Below you will find 4 images from[…]

The people behind the papers: Thanh Vuong-Brender & Michel Labouesse

Posted by on March 30th, 2017

This year marks the centenary of D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form, an attempt to outline the physical and mathematical principles underpinning the generation of biological form. Modern day developmental biologists, bolstered by new technologies, have taken up Thompson’s cause to try to understand the mechanics of development, particularly with regard to morphogenesis. While the generation[…]

STEM Graduates announce partnership with the Science Council

Posted by on March 30th, 2017

STEM Graduates is a graduate recruitment agency and jobs board. We offer permanent salaried roles to students and graduates from Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics disciplines. We believe these candidates have a unique set of career needs that can only be met by a specialist within this field. We launched STEM Women in 2016 to[…]

A New Way To Look At Human Development

Posted by on March 29th, 2017

  Throughout history, the desire of scientists to understand physiology and disease by thoroughly studying anatomical features, has always faced an intractable limitation: they cannot simply see through the tissue! Dissection has therefore been the modus operandi of anatomists: from Galen’s pioneering studies, to modern day biologists who routinely section tissues to label structures for[…]

Biologists find ‘skin-and-bones’ mechanism underlying zebrafish fin regeneration

Posted by on March 28th, 2017

This Press Release from the University of Oregon was originally posted on Eurekalert.   EUGENE, Ore. March 28, 2017 University of Oregon biologists have figured out how zebrafish perfectly regenerate amputated fins with a precisely organized skeleton. Adult zebrafish fins, including their complex skeleton, regenerate exactly to their original form within two weeks after an[…]