the community site for and by developmental biologists

Register for Cellular Dynamics: Membrane-Cytoskeleton Interface meeting by 21st of March!

Posted by on March 14th, 2017

The deadline for applications for this exciting meeting is approaching fast. For more information, or to apply, click here. Organisers: Michael Way, Elizabeth Chen, Margaret Gardel and Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz Date: 21 – 24 May 2017 Location: Southbridge Hotel & Conference Center, Massachusetts, USA Speakers: Anna Akhmanova (Utrecht University, The Netherlands) Daniel Billadeau (Mayo Clinic, USA)[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 144, Issue 6) – SPECIAL ISSUE ON ORGANOIDS

Posted by on March 14th, 2017

The current issue of Development – our Special Issue on Organoids – features a collection of review- and research-based articles focusing on organoids. Here are some of the highlights. Happy reading (and thanks to everyone who contributed)!   Organoids: a Special Issue In her Editorial, Melissa Little provides an overview of the entire contents of the[…]

Organelle Assembly in Vivo: The Love-Hate Relationship of Thermodynamic and Active Processes

Posted by on March 6th, 2017

Comment on ”Independent active and thermodynamic processes govern nucleolus assembly in vivo”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114 (6), 1335-1340, (2017). Hanieh Falahati, Lewis–Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University. Eric Wieschaus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University.   The whole universe is moving toward disorder; this is the[…]

February in preprints

Posted by on March 6th, 2017

Our latest monthly trawl for developmental biology (and other cool) preprints. See June’s introductory post for background, and let us know if we missed anything   Another month, another bumper crop of preprints covering everything from calcium waves in the fly to the first mutant ant line, plant superhero genes to rat embryonic stem cells. Plus,[…]

New signal revealed for birth of blood stem cells in vertebrates

Posted by on March 1st, 2017

Jamie R. Genthe and Wilson K. Clements   When blood goes bad, a replacement is often needed. Each year, thousands of patients in the US receive bone marrow transplants to treat life-threatening diseases like blood cancer. But in some cases, the transplant itself can become deadly. The problem is not necessarily the one most people think[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 144, Issue 5)

Posted by on February 28th, 2017

Here are the highlights from the new issue of Development:   Adding a new layer of complexity to pre-eclampsia Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy complication associated with abnormal formation of the placenta. To date, most studies of PE have focussed on cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) within the villous placenta (the chorion frondosum); the deficient invasion of these[…]

Matching neurons to limbs: an evolutionary perspective on motor system development

Posted by on February 24th, 2017

Comment on “Divergent Hox Coding and Evasion of Retinoid Signaling Specifies Motor Neurons Innervating Digit Muscles” Neuron 93, 1–14, February 22, 2017. Alana I. Mendelsohn, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Jeremy S. Dasen, Department of Neuroscience, NYU Thomas M. Jessell, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University[…]

Send your nominations for BSDB committee members by 7 March

Posted by on February 22nd, 2017

The BSDB invites nominations for three new committee members, who will commence their 5 year term in October 2017 replacing three members who will retire this year. Committee members are required to (make every attempt to) attend two committee meetings per year, one of which coincides with the annual BSDB Spring Meeting.   All nominations[…]

The people behind the papers #15

Posted by on February 21st, 2017

Conjoined twins have fascinated biologists for centuries. In twins joined at the thorax, left-right patterning is disrupted, but only in one half of the right hand twins. Today’s paper, from this week’s issue of Current Biology, tackles this enigmatic phenomenon using Xenopus, and reveals that laterality in conjoined twins is determined by cilia-driven leftward flow.[…]

Why are geneticists measuring the webbing between mouse embryo fingers?

Posted by on February 21st, 2017

A new paper published in Journal of Anatomy shows that measuring the amount of inter-digital webbing in mouse embryos between 14 and 15 days gestation is the best way to find out their exact stage of development. So why is this important to a geneticist? If we want to discover a causal link between a gene[…]