the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts in the category: Research [Clear Filter]

CENTURI 2020 Postdoc call | 8 open positions in Marseille

Posted by on March 19th, 2020

  CENTURI is recruiting up to 8 Postdocs to start in October 2020, for two years! Recruited candidates will join our vibrant interdisciplinary community in Marseille (France).   Applications to our call will be open until April 17. Candidates can either apply to one of the advertised CENTURI projects or submit their own project, providing[…]

Moving neuromuscular disorders research forward: from novel models to clinical studies

Posted by on February 27th, 2020

This Editorial by Maaike van Putten, Julija Hmeljak, Annemieke Aartsma-Rus and James J. Dowling was recently published in Development’s sister journal Disease Models & Mechanisms, announcing a new Special Issue. Neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) encompass a diverse group of genetic diseases characterized by loss of muscle functionality. Despite extensive efforts to develop therapies, no curative treatment[…]

Growing a body, one tiny tug at a time

Posted by on February 24th, 2020

From Knowable Magazine’s Special Report: Building Bodies. For an introduction to the series see Eva Emerson and Rosie Mestel’s Node post. For decades, genetics and biochemistry have formed the bedrock of developmental biology. But it turns out that physical forces — the way cells push, pull and squeeze each other — play a huge role,[…]

Bent into shape: The rules of tree form

Posted by on February 17th, 2020

From Knowable Magazine’s Special Report: Building Bodies. For an introduction to the series see Eva Emerson and Rosie Mestel’s Node post. How do trees find their sense of direction as they grow? Researchers are getting to the root — and the branches — of how the grandest of plants develop. By Rachel Ehrenberg   There’s[…]

Preventing cellular mixing with programmed cell death

Posted by on February 12th, 2020

By Lisandro Maya-Ramos and Takashi Mikawa Bilaterality, the property of having two symmetrical sides, is widely conserved among animals. It is estimated that 99% of all animal species are bilaterians, with the remaining 1% composed by sponges and radial animals, which lack or have radial symmetry respectively (1).  Although bilaterality is widespread among animals, little[…]

BSDB Gurdon/The Company of Biologists 2019 Summer Studentship Report – Jake Cornwall Scoones

Posted by on January 29th, 2020

Established by the British Society for Developmental Biology in 2014, The Gurdon/The Company of Biologists Summer Studentship scheme provides financial support to allow highly motivated undergraduate students an opportunity to engage in practical research during their summer vacation. Each year, ten successful applicants spend eight weeks in the research laboratories of their choices, and the feedback[…]

Off and On: it’s more complicated than we thought.

Posted by on January 23rd, 2020

We learn fairly early on when becoming biologists that both development and an organism’s response to environmental stressors require turning the right set of genes on in the right cells, at the right time. Clearly, for “on” to be meaningful, other genes have to be “off,” and many disordered conditions are associated with misexpression of[…]

CENTURI recruits group leaders

Posted by on January 14th, 2020

  CENTURI seeks to attract outstanding computer scientists, physicists, or mathematicians with a theoretical and/or computational biology project. The selected candidates, who are expected to bridge biology and other disciplines will be affiliated to two institutes and will be offered competitive funding.   The questions that are being addressed by this interdisciplinary research initiative include:[…]

What might evolutionary muscle loss and pathological atrophies have in common?

Posted by on January 8th, 2020

By Mai P. Tran and Kimberly L. Cooper “It’s the cutest rodent I have ever seen, even cuter than a cuddly hamster, and it would be fun doing a rotation for the opportunity to work with this animal.” That was my thought, as a first-year graduate student, when I first heard Kim present her research on[…]

Postdoctoral Fellowship: Studies of how niche-rearrangements control organ progenitor fate

Posted by on December 11th, 2019

OPEN POSTDOCTORAL POSITION  The Semb group is looking for a postdoctoral candidate with a strong developmental biology/cellular mechanobiology and/or a biological image processing background to identify and study novel cell and molecular mechanisms predicting the differentiation of bi-potent progenitors in the developing pancreas. During organogenesis fate-determining cues are generated by dynamic interactions between stem cells/progenitors, their[…]