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From Image to Insight – Morphogenesis Meets Data Science

Posted by on September 26th, 2020

A wave of innovations is advancing data-driven computational analysis and machine learning – time for developmental biologists to hop on the surf board! This post, inspired by our recent data-driven work on lateral line morphogenesis, provides a brief primer on key concepts and terms. written by Jonas Hartmann & Darren Gilmour From machine translation to[…]

From mysterious cysts to CSF-in-a-dish

Posted by on September 21st, 2020

Our brain is immersed in a clear, colourless, nutrient-rich fluid called the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which provides mechanical support to the brain and helps to circulate important molecules for brain development and function. Within the interconnected cavities of our brain, the CSF flows in and out constantly. The CSF is actively produced by the choroid[…]

Delineating the making of an embryo

Posted by on September 15th, 2020

By Hanna L. Sladitschek and Pierre A. Neveu   Our body consists of a multitude of highly specialized tissues: the neurons in our retina seem to have little in common with the glandular cells in the intestine or our muscle fibers. Yet nothing hints at that complexity at the time of conception, when the genomes[…]

Mayflies: an emergent model to investigate the evolution of winged insects

Posted by on September 11th, 2020

Winged insects are the most diverse and numerous group of animals on Earth. This great diversity has been possible thanks to the acquisition of novel morphologies and lifestyles. How the changes in their genomes contributed to the appearance and evolution of these traits is key to understand how this lineage adapted and conquered the huge[…]

Senior Laboratory Research Scientist – Francis Crick Institute

Posted by on September 10th, 2020

Who are we? We are looking for a highly motivated Senior Laboratory Research Scientist to join the Santos laboratory headed by Dr Silvia Santos at the Francis Crick Institute. The lab focuses on understanding cell decision-making. Current areas of research include understanding regulatory mechanism of cell division and cellular differentiation, using human embryonic stem cells[…]

Postdoctoral Research Fellow position in stem cells and intestinal regeneration- Patel lab U. of Bristol

Posted by on September 6th, 2020

We are looking for a passionate, intellectually curious and creative postdoctoral research fellow with a strong interest in tissue maintenance, regeneration and ageing to join our lab.   The Patel lab at the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Bristol studies how tissues regenerate themselves after damage and how they maintain themselves over[…]

POSTDOC POSITION OPEN AT RuiDiogoLab

Posted by on September 1st, 2020

Postdoc Position: Visible Ape & Dissemination & Research Hiring Institution: Howard Univ.; Posted: 09-1-2020; Duration PostDoc: Sept2020-Aug2022 A postdoctoral researcher is sought to join the Rui Diogo lab (www.ruidiogolab.com), at the Howard University College of Medicine, Department of Anatomy (Washington DC).   Within the field, this is one of the labs with a higher impact, number of[…]

Postdoctoral Research Fellow position: Evolutionary Origin of Synapses and Neurons at Sars Centre in Bergen, Norway

Posted by on August 6th, 2020

There is a vacancy for a postdoctoral research fellow position at the Sars International Centre for Marine Molecular Biology (www.sars.no) in the research group headed by Dr. Pawel Burkhardt. The position is for a period of 3 years and is funded on the Sars Centre core budget. The Sars Centre belongs to the University of[…]

Monotreme ears and the evolution of mammal jaws

Posted by on August 5th, 2020

Jaw joints, in most vertebrate animals that have them, form between a bone in the head called the quadrate and one in the mandible called the articular. The mandibles (lower jaw bone) of most vertebrates is compound, made up of fused bones, but we mammals are different.  We have lots of different types of teeth[…]

Genetically modified non-human primate fetuses as models to study the role of candidate genes for increasing size and folding of the human neocortex during development and evolution

Posted by on July 27th, 2020

By Michael Heide and Wieland B. Huttner   Introduction The neocortex is the seat of our higher cognitive abilities that distinguish us from other mammals and that make us human (Rakic, 2009). One basis for this crucial feature is the increase in the size of the neocortex during hominin evolution, culminating in modern humans (Striedter,[…]