the community site for and by developmental biologists

SDB 2020 Conference Reflection – My First Society for Developmental Biology Conference

Posted by on August 11th, 2020

My name is Alicia Ugenti and I am an undergraduate from Amherst College studying Biology and Sexuality, Women’s, and Gender Studies. Last year, I took a course in Developmental Biology and for the past three years, I have conducted research in the lab of Katerina Ragkousi, with my time now culminating into a thesis for[…]

List of virtual talks, seminars, forums

Posted by on August 10th, 2020

Updated 10 August. Let us know if we missed anything   Various organisations and looser assemblies of locked down researchers have begun to put together online seminar and talk series, many of which are open to anyone (usually with registration), and many of which also have previous talks recorded. Here’s a list of what we’ve[…]

Monotreme ears and the evolution of mammal jaws

Posted by on August 5th, 2020

Jaw joints, in most vertebrate animals that have them, form between a bone in the head called the quadrate and one in the mandible called the articular. The mandibles (lower jaw bone) of most vertebrates is compound, made up of fused bones, but we mammals are different.  We have lots of different types of teeth[…]

July in preprints

Posted by on August 4th, 2020

Welcome to our monthly trawl for developmental biology (and related) preprints.  This month features a host of preprints on human development at the single cell level (perhaps all submitted in time for Development’s September meeting?), plus insights into how butterflies make clear wings and how worms achieve meiosis, and a whole lot more. Preprints hosted[…]

Genetics Unzipped podcast: Sickness and susceptibility – the ancient war between genes and disease

Posted by on July 30th, 2020

In the latest episode of Genetics Unzipped, Kat Arney looks at the ancient war between our genes and the pathogens that infect us.

Genetically modified non-human primate fetuses as models to study the role of candidate genes for increasing size and folding of the human neocortex during development and evolution

Posted by on July 27th, 2020

By Michael Heide and Wieland B. Huttner   Introduction The neocortex is the seat of our higher cognitive abilities that distinguish us from other mammals and that make us human (Rakic, 2009). One basis for this crucial feature is the increase in the size of the neocortex during hominin evolution, culminating in modern humans (Striedter,[…]

Building plant weapons

Posted by on July 27th, 2020

By Fei Zhang and Vivian F. Irish Flowering plants, from giant sequoias to miniscule duckweed, all depend on the action of small populations of cells, called meristems, to grow.  Meristems contain stem cells that continue to proliferate to give rise to roots, shoots, leaves, and branches. However, there are situations in which meristematic cells cease[…]

Pandemic networking: meeting people is easy

Posted by on July 22nd, 2020

Registration is now open for our virtual networking event!     With COVID-19 cancelling conferences, researchers have lost one of their best ways to network. So we thought we’d try to help, aided by software that creates a virtual space for researchers to interact via video. At this event you’ll meet other developmental biologists from[…]

Retracting sheaths and words

Posted by on July 17th, 2020

My mentor, Bruce Appel, emphasizes the importance of communicating science clearly and precisely. Consequently, I have watched my peers and myself deliver ever-improving talks, posters, and manuscripts during our time in the lab. I think that many people in science appreciate that clear communication is essential for others to be able to interpret findings and[…]