the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts in the category: Interview [Clear Filter]

The people behind the papers: Lijun Chi and Paul Delgado-Olguin

Posted by on June 9th, 2017

Development of the placental vasculature – known as the labyrinth – is critical for foetal development. Today’s paper comes from the most recent issue of Development and addresses the signalling events involved in placental vascular maturation. We caught up with lead author Lijun Chi and her PI Paul Delgado-Olguin of the Hospital for Sick Children and University[…]

An interview with Hiroshi Hamada

Posted by on June 5th, 2017

This interview by Katherine Brown first appeared in Development, Volume 144, Issue 11. Hiroshi Hamada is the Director of the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology (CDB) in Kobe, Japan. His lab focusses on the establishment of left-right asymmetry in the mouse embryo, and the role of cilia in the symmetry-breaking event. Hiroshi’s work has been recognised[…]

The SDB-BSDB interview chain: Yusuff Abdu interviews Claire Bromley

Posted by on May 26th, 2017

Each year, the British and US societies for Developmental Biology have their annual meeting, the BSDB‘s usually in April, the SDB‘s usually in July. The winner of the student poster prize in each of the meetings gets the chance to go to the other society’s meeting the following year. Beginning in 2012, the Node began getting the winners together for[…]

The people behind the papers: Gabriel Krens and Carl-Philipp Heisenberg

Posted by on May 25th, 2017

Cell sorting is a critical process during development, as differently specified cells are segregated to the right parts of the embryo. Differences in cell adhesion and cortical tension are thought to be crucial to this process, but the mechanics have been difficult to probe in vivo. This week’s paper, published in the current issue of[…]

An interview with Eric Wieschaus

Posted by on May 18th, 2017

I had started to become a little worried when I didn’t see Eric on the opening day of the conference, but it turned out that his plane to Germany had been delayed by the snowstorms blanketing the Eastern seaboard of the US and he made it in the end. Between sessions later on, we found a slightly[…]

An interview with John Gurdon

Posted by on May 4th, 2017

On a bright, cold morning at the beginning of March, I went back to the institute I once worked in to interview the man after whom the place was named. Greeting me at the entrance, John Gurdon apologised for being a little late and asked if it was alright to delay the interview for five minutes[…]

The people behind the papers: Adam Davis, Nirav Amin and Nanette Nascone-Yoder

Posted by on April 13th, 2017

In spite of our external appearance, our innards are asymmetric. For today’s interview, we feature a paper published recently in Development that provides a cellular and molecular investigation into symmetry breaking in a poorly understood organ, the stomach. We caught up with first authors Adam Davis and Nirav Amin, and their supervisor Nanette Nascone-Yoder, Associate Professor in North Carolina State University, Raleigh,[…]

The people behind the papers: Dae Seok Eom & David Parichy

Posted by on April 7th, 2017

Macrophages are usually associated with immunity, but have increasingly appreciated functions in development and homeostasis. This week we meet the authors of a recent Science paper that identified a role for macrophages in zebrafish stripe patterning, revealing a remarkable ‘relay’ mechanism whereby macrophages help one type of cell signal to another via cytoplasmic extensions. Postdoc[…]

The people behind the papers: Thanh Vuong-Brender & Michel Labouesse

Posted by on March 30th, 2017

This year marks the centenary of D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form, an attempt to outline the physical and mathematical principles underpinning the generation of biological form. Modern day developmental biologists, bolstered by new technologies, have taken up Thompson’s cause to try to understand the mechanics of development, particularly with regard to morphogenesis. While the generation[…]

The people behind the papers: Matthias Tisler & Martin Blum

Posted by on February 21st, 2017

Conjoined twins have fascinated biologists for centuries. In twins joined at the thorax, left-right patterning is disrupted, but only in one half of the right hand twins. Today’s paper, from this week’s issue of Current Biology, tackles this enigmatic phenomenon using Xenopus, and reveals that laterality in conjoined twins is determined by cilia-driven leftward flow.[…]