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Displaying posts with the tag: forgotten-classics [Clear Filter]

Forgotten classics: Making a monotreme

Posted by on October 17th, 2017

T. Thomson Flynn and J.P. Hill. 1939. The Development of the Monotrema – Part IV. Growth of the Ovarian Ovum, Maturation, Fertilisation and Early Cleavage. Transactions of the Zoological Society of London, 24, 445-623. T. Thomson Flynn and J.P. Hill. 1947. The Development of the Monotrema – Part VI. The Later Stages of Cleavage and[…]

Forgotten classics: Cut and paste embryology

Posted by on February 2nd, 2017

Hörstadius, S. 1939. The mechanics of sea urchin development, studied by operative methods. Biological Reviews 14(2):132-179. Recommended by Bob Goldstein, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill   Sven Hörstadius stands alongside the likes of Boveri, Spemann, Mangold and Driesch as a giant of experimental embryology in the first half of the twentieth century. While[…]

Forgotten classics: Rosa Beddington’s chimeras

Posted by on November 11th, 2016

R. S. P. Beddington (1981). An autoradiographic analysis of the potency of embryonic ectoderm in the 8th day postimplantation mouse embryo. Journal of Experimental Embryology and Morphology. 64: 87-10. Open Access R. S. P. Beddington (1982). An autoradiographic analysis of tissue potency in different regions of the embryonic ectoderm during gastrulation in the mouse. Journal of Experimental[…]

Forgotten classics: Tracing the heart

Posted by on August 17th, 2016

de la Cruz, M.V., Sánchez-Gómez, C. & Palomino, M.A. (1989) The primitive cardiac regions in the straight tube heart (Stage 9–) and their anatomical expression in the mature heart: an experimental study in the chick embryo. Journal of Anatomy 165: 121-131. Recommended by Benoit Bruneau, Gladstone Institute for Cardiovascular Disease   Two previous posts in[…]

Forgotten classics- Genetic mosaics in Drosophila

Posted by on May 11th, 2016

Bryant, P.J., Schneiderman, H. A. (1969). Cell lineage, growth, and determination in the imaginal leg discs of Drosophila melanogaster. Developmental Biology 20, 263–290   Recommended by Peter Lawrence (University of Cambridge)     The first article in this series was the 1940 paper that first identified the number of cell layers in the shoot meristem.[…]

Forgotten classics- Regulating the size of the mouse embryo

Posted by on April 6th, 2016

  Snow, M. H. L., Tam, P. P. L. (1979) Is compensatory growth a complicating factor in mouse teratology? Nature 279, 555-557 Lewis, N. E., Rossant, J. (1982) Mechanism of size regulation in mouse embryo aggregates J. Embryol. exp. Morph 72, 169-181 Recommended by James Briscoe (Francis Crick Institute)     As our previous forgotten[…]

Forgotten classics- Principles of morphogenesis

Posted by on March 10th, 2016

  Gustafson, T., Wolpert, L. (1967) Cellular movement and contact in sea urchin morphogenesis. Biological reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 42, 442-498. Recommended by Thomas Lecuit (IBDM- Developmental Biology Institute of Marseille)   In the beginning of his famous 1969 paper on positional information, Lewis Wolpert states that “the central problem of the development[…]

Forgotten classics- T. H. Morgan and planarian regeneration

Posted by on February 16th, 2016

  Morgan, T.H. (1898) Experimental studies of the regeneration of Planaria maculata. Archiv für Entwicklungsmechanik der Organismen 7, 364-397 Recommended by Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado (Stowers Institute)   Some classic papers are only cited a few times, and the work therein has been largely forgotten. But that does not mean these works are not worth revisiting.[…]

Forgotten classics- Cell layers in the shoot meristem

Posted by on January 12th, 2016

  Satina, S., Blakeslee, A.F., and Avery, A.G. (1940) Demonstration of the Three Germ Layers in the Shoot Apex of Datura by Means of Induced Polyploidy in Periclinal Chimeras. American Journal of Botany 27, 895-905 Recommended by Jane Langdale (University of Oxford)   If you read about plant development in textbooks you will be told[…]

Forgotten classics of developmental biology- a new Node series

Posted by on January 12th, 2016

You just started your research career, or maybe you just moved fields. The first thing on your to-do list is to catch up with the literature. What has been the latest progress? What are the open questions in the field? Ideally, you would go all the way back to the beginnings of the field and[…]