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Displaying posts in the category: Lab Life [Clear Filter]

Adhesion and signaling by Collagen IV intercellular concentrations (CIVICs)

Posted by on October 16th, 2017

The Great Wall of Collagen IV During the long history of evolution, the key innovation that gave rise to animals with true tissues was the extracellular matrix, very conserved from sponges to humans [1]. Before I started my PhD in the lab of Jose C. Pastor-Pareja at Tsinghua University in Beijing, he had described how[…]

Switch the career after PhD

Posted by on October 16th, 2017

Dear Colleagues, I am PhD graduate in Biotechnology focusing on Insect Molecular Biology and Plant Virology. After completion of my PhD in Agriculture sector, I would like to switch my career to medical sciences or advance biotech tools like studies in stem cells, or CRISPR. Should I repeat PhD in medical sciences or is there[…]

A 10-Step “Protocol” for Antibody Search

Posted by on October 12th, 2017

I remember when I first started grad school. I was pumped about my project, examining the signaling and physiological role of a novel dopamine receptor complex. We had experienced research associates, state-of-the-art equipment, and bold hypotheses. I was ready to take the first step on the road of biomedical discoveries. Then I faced my first[…]

A case for beer – or – what a density gradient medium can do for your microscopy.

Posted by on September 21st, 2017

Our paper, like so many scientific findings, was brought about by a beer – or more specifically a discussion over a beer.   “I had a beer with David (Drechsel)” Jochen (Rink) said to me after one of our weekly scientific social events at the MPI-CBG. Over their beers they had discussed the challenges we[…]

Allometry in a Simple Cell Network

Posted by on September 19th, 2017

A post by Jasmin Imran Alsous, on work done in collaboration with Paul Villoutreix and Alexander M. Berezhkovskii in the Shvartsman lab. I started working on Drosophila egg chambers from the day I joined the Shvartsman lab. Egg chambers are small clusters of cells that eventually develop into mature oocytes in the abdomen of the female[…]

A New (and open-access!) Antibody Search Platform: BenchSci

Posted by on July 13th, 2017

Antibodies are one of the most commonly used research reagents. However, due to their innate variability, finding the right antibody can be a challenge. Scientists devote a significant amount of time sifting through the literature to find antibodies that have been shown to work under specific experimental contexts matching their research interests. This process often[…]

A day in the life of a modern Lernaean Hydra…

Posted by on July 3rd, 2017

I am Eleni Chrysostomou, a PhD student in Uri Frank‘s lab at the National University of Ireland, Galway. The Frank lab’s general interest is development and regeneration, stem and germ cell biology, neural fate commitment, and the chromatin biology underlying these processes. The focus of my project is the roles of SoxB transcription factors (TFs)[…]

Grant writing tips for PhDs and Post Docs

Posted by on May 30th, 2017

Like most things in life, research requires funding and scholarships. This becomes increasingly apparent as researchers progress through their career. At some point, everyone has to jump on the funding treadmill. For many researchers, the first experience of a grant application process may be applying for postgraduate scholarships for their masters/PhD. While I never pursued[…]

A day in the life of an Oikopleura Lab

Posted by on May 23rd, 2017

The recent bloom of genomic data from all of life’s kingdoms is revealing a novel perspective of gene loss as a pervasive source of genetic variation with a great potential to generate phenotypic diversity and to shape the evolution of gene networks. How do genes become dispensable and subsequently lost? Are patterns of gene loss[…]

The evolution of an axon guidance model: from chemotaxis to haptotaxis

Posted by on May 16th, 2017

The canonical model The publication of Marc Tessier-Lavigne’s seminal Cell papers (1, 2) in 1994 describing the identification of netrin1 (from the Sanskrit word, netr, meaning “one who guides”) was a defining moment in my graduate career. My friends and I talked about those papers for weeks, from the incredible technical feat, the biochemical purification[…]