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Displaying posts in the category: Lab Life [Clear Filter]

A New (and open-access!) Antibody Search Platform: BenchSci

Posted by on July 13th, 2017

Antibodies are one of the most commonly used research reagents. However, due to their innate variability, finding the right antibody can be a challenge. Scientists devote a significant amount of time sifting through the literature to find antibodies that have been shown to work under specific experimental contexts matching their research interests. This process often[…]

A day in the life of a modern Lernaean Hydra…

Posted by on July 3rd, 2017

I am Eleni Chrysostomou, a PhD student in Uri Frank‘s lab at the National University of Ireland, Galway. The Frank lab’s general interest is development and regeneration, stem and germ cell biology, neural fate commitment, and the chromatin biology underlying these processes. The focus of my project is the roles of SoxB transcription factors (TFs)[…]

Grant writing tips for PhDs and Post Docs

Posted by on May 30th, 2017

Like most things in life, research requires funding and scholarships. This becomes increasingly apparent as researchers progress through their career. At some point, everyone has to jump on the funding treadmill. For many researchers, the first experience of a grant application process may be applying for postgraduate scholarships for their masters/PhD. While I never pursued[…]

A day in the life of an Oikopleura Lab

Posted by on May 23rd, 2017

The recent bloom of genomic data from all of life’s kingdoms is revealing a novel perspective of gene loss as a pervasive source of genetic variation with a great potential to generate phenotypic diversity and to shape the evolution of gene networks. How do genes become dispensable and subsequently lost? Are patterns of gene loss[…]

The evolution of an axon guidance model: from chemotaxis to haptotaxis

Posted by on May 16th, 2017

The canonical model The publication of Marc Tessier-Lavigne’s seminal Cell papers (1, 2) in 1994 describing the identification of netrin1 (from the Sanskrit word, netr, meaning “one who guides”) was a defining moment in my graduate career. My friends and I talked about those papers for weeks, from the incredible technical feat, the biochemical purification[…]

Shaping Snapdragons

Posted by on April 4th, 2017

Have you ever wondered what makes the shapes in the animal and plant kingdom so different? We take for granted the diversity of natural shapes that surround us, from a simple pine leaf to complex orchid flower. However, they pose one of the most beautiful scientific challenges. For centuries, scientists have been fascinated by how[…]

A day in the life of a larval-microbe lab

Posted by on March 21st, 2017

Hello, my name is Tyler Carrier and I am a second year PhD student in the laboratory of Adam Reitzel at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Broadly speaking, this laboratory focuses on the ecology, evolution, and development of marine invertebrates and their life history stages. The basis of this work uses echinoderms and[…]

Organelle Assembly in Vivo: The Love-Hate Relationship of Thermodynamic and Active Processes

Posted by on March 6th, 2017

Comment on ”Independent active and thermodynamic processes govern nucleolus assembly in vivo”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114 (6), 1335-1340, (2017). Hanieh Falahati, Lewis–Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University. Eric Wieschaus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University.   The whole universe is moving toward disorder; this is the[…]

Matching neurons to limbs: an evolutionary perspective on motor system development

Posted by on February 24th, 2017

Comment on “Divergent Hox Coding and Evasion of Retinoid Signaling Specifies Motor Neurons Innervating Digit Muscles” Neuron 93, 1–14, February 22, 2017. Alana I. Mendelsohn, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University Jeremy S. Dasen, Department of Neuroscience, NYU Thomas M. Jessell, Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University[…]

Uncovering Non-canonical Roles of E-cadherin Beyond Cell Adhesion

Posted by on February 14th, 2017

Broad perspective Successful division was an essential criterion for establishing the cell as the basic unit of life on earth. Later, cell-cell adhesion made possible the evolution of multicellular life forms. These two fundamental cellular processes co-function throughout the life of an organism, during development, wound healing and tissue regeneration. In epithelial tissues this results[…]