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Color-blind people are your audience too!

Posted by on April 27th, 2017

Or, please stop mixing green/red Color is a key aspect of graphic design, but for many years was not relevant for scientific figures that were largely black and white. Falling prices for color print and electronic publishing changed this dramatically and scientists now frequently produce multi-colored figures. Using color functionally is not always straightforward but[…]

Woods Hole images 2015, Round 1 – The winner

Posted by on April 18th, 2017

The votes are in for our latest Development cover competition with entries from the 2015 class of the Woods Hole Embryology Course.  With 578 votes counted, a winner emerged with 40% of the vote –   4th Place (72 votes) – Clathria 3rd Place (136 votes) – Mice 2nd Place (138 votes) – Jellyfish 1st[…]

Vote for a Development cover – Woods Hole Images 2015, Round 1

Posted by on March 30th, 2017

The Woods Hole Embryology Course, which will celebrate its 124th birthday this year, is a continual source of beautiful images (and videos) of development. Since 2011 the Node has run a competition for the community to pick the best images from a given year –  the winning pictures become immortalised as Development covers! Below you will find 4 images from[…]

Transposons in Embryo Space – TRACER maps in EMAGE

Posted by on February 9th, 2017

A recent publication in Developmental Biology by (Armit et al., 2017) describes how the TRACER dataset can be spatially compared with in situ hybridisation gene expression profiles.   The TRACER dataset of transposon-associated regulatory sensors (Chen et al., 2013) utilises Sleeping Beauty lacZ transposons that have been randomly integrated into the mouse genome Hundreds of[…]

The 12 GIFs of Christmas

Posted by on December 23rd, 2016

To celebrate the Yuletide, we put together the 12 Development GIFs of Christmas on Twitter, a celebration of the beauty and breadth of developmental biology in endless hypnotic loops that you could watch for ages.   Happy GIFmas!   🎄1/12 @Dev_Journal GIFs of Christmas🎄SPIM #zebrafish, from Bassi, et al. https://t.co/36Kl6A72Ow pic.twitter.com/8NIO1M9t3j — the Node (@the_Node)[…]

From biology to art

Posted by on November 4th, 2016

At the BSDB’s  Autumn Meeting on chimeras, scientist and artist Mia Buehr exhibited some of her art inspired by developmental biology. Here, she introduces her pieces. You can keep up with her work at theaccidentalembroiderer.typepad.com   I was born into a family of artists, and painting and drawing were always second nature to me. However I[…]

Where does blood come from in the first place and how is it made?

Posted by on September 14th, 2016

Commentary on Transforming Growth Factor β Drives Hemogenic Endothelium Programming and the Transition to Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Developmental Cell, Volume 38, Issue 4, p358–370, 22 August 2016   Each of us has around 6 pints of blood. The blood contains a number of different types of cells, including oxygen-transporting red blood cells, disease-protecting white[…]

#BarBarPlots!

Posted by on August 31st, 2016

(or: how to avoid misleading representations of statistical data)   Recently, a kickstarter project raised more than 3000€ in one month to campaign for banning the wrong usage of bar plots in scientific journals. This demonstrates two important points: a lot of the plots in scientific journals are quite misleading, and, a growing number of[…]

Tackling Differentiated Stem Cell Production

Posted by on August 26th, 2016

This post was originally posted on eurostemcell.org, Europe’s stem cell hub.   by Julia Turan Part of the fascinating potential of stem cells is their ability to provide replacement cells and tissues to treat diseases. In order to do this most effectively, scientists need to be able to create differentiated cells quickly and accurately. However, making[…]

3D mini-brain sheds light on Zika Virus in the brain

Posted by on June 10th, 2016

The Zika virus is making headlines as a major world health crisis linked to a host of neurological conditions. In the cases of microcephaly and Guillain-Barre, the evidence that Zika Virus is the root of the condition is strong enough to be considered causal. Babies born to infected mothers often have microcephaly, a condition that manifests[…]