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Displaying posts in the category: Images [Clear Filter]

Scales in scientific images

Posted by on August 6th, 2017

I recently saw drawings by Maria Sybilla Merian at Kupferstichkabinett Berlin and the University Library Dresden. Merian, who lived from 1647 to 1717, is renowned for her exceptional illustrations of biological specimens and gained recognition as a scientist for her nature observations, for example, of insect metamorphosis.     Merian evidently was genius in choosing[…]

Four recent science art & photography announcements

Posted by on July 13th, 2017

Worm art at #Worm17 Each year at the International C. elegans Conference Ahna Skop organises a Worm Art Show with winners selected by the meeting participants (find out more about the history of the show here).  2017’s winners have just been announced – read about them over at the GSA’s Genes to Genomes blog (a great site for your bookmarks[…]

Woods Hole images 2015, Round 2 – The winner

Posted by on June 21st, 2017

The votes are in for our latest Development cover competition with entries from the 2015 class of the Woods Hole Embryology Course.  With 333 votes counted, we have a winner: 4th Place (13% of the votes) – Drosophila 3rd Place (25% of the votes) – Skate 2nd Place (26% of the votes) – Parhyale 1st Place (36% of the votes) – Crab  […]

Photo Contest

Posted by on June 21st, 2017

Hello everyone!! My name is Nadia Edelsztein and I am a PhD student from Argentina working in the Reproductive and Development field! I am addressing you all to ask for a big favour. I entered a photo contest a couple of weeks ago, held by the institute where I used to learn German. The idea[…]

One more day to vote!

Posted by on June 20th, 2017

Our image competition for a future Development cover is still live: voting closes tomorrow at 13.00 GMT! Click here to vote and find out more about the images   (No Ratings Yet) Loading…

Vote for a Development cover – Woods Hole Images 2015, Round 2

Posted by on May 31st, 2017

The Woods Hole Embryology Course, which will celebrate its 124th birthday this year, is a continual source of beautiful images (and videos) of development. Since 2011 the Node has run a competition for the community to pick the best images from a given year –  the winning pictures become immortalised as Development covers. Below you will find 4 images from[…]

Color-blind people are your audience too!

Posted by on April 27th, 2017

Or, please stop mixing green/red Color is a key aspect of graphic design, but for many years was not relevant for scientific figures that were largely black and white. Falling prices for color print and electronic publishing changed this dramatically and scientists now frequently produce multi-colored figures. Using color functionally is not always straightforward but[…]

Woods Hole images 2015, Round 1 – The winner

Posted by on April 18th, 2017

The votes are in for our latest Development cover competition with entries from the 2015 class of the Woods Hole Embryology Course.  With 578 votes counted, a winner emerged with 40% of the vote –   4th Place (72 votes) – Clathria 3rd Place (136 votes) – Mice 2nd Place (138 votes) – Jellyfish 1st[…]

Vote for a Development cover – Woods Hole Images 2015, Round 1

Posted by on March 30th, 2017

The Woods Hole Embryology Course, which will celebrate its 124th birthday this year, is a continual source of beautiful images (and videos) of development. Since 2011 the Node has run a competition for the community to pick the best images from a given year –  the winning pictures become immortalised as Development covers! Below you will find 4 images from[…]

Transposons in Embryo Space – TRACER maps in EMAGE

Posted by on February 9th, 2017

A recent publication in Developmental Biology by (Armit et al., 2017) describes how the TRACER dataset can be spatially compared with in situ hybridisation gene expression profiles.   The TRACER dataset of transposon-associated regulatory sensors (Chen et al., 2013) utilises Sleeping Beauty lacZ transposons that have been randomly integrated into the mouse genome Hundreds of[…]