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From bench to newspaper

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A day in the life of a maize lab

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BSDB Gurdon Summer Studentship Report (3)

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How to eradicate an organ

In Development this week (Vol. 142, Issue 5)

Posted by on February 24th, 2015

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   pancRNAs in early development Promoter-associated noncoding RNAs (pancRNAs) are a class of long noncoding RNAs, transcribed from bidirectional promoters and thought to be involved in promoting expression of the gene transcribed from the opposite strand. Takuya Imamura and colleagues (p.910) now set out to […]
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How to eradicate an organ

Posted by on February 11th, 2015

 Phreatichthys andruzzii, lateral view (left), frontal view (right) Adaptations of some fish species to their environment can be most peculiar, especially within cave dwelling kinds. The so called troglomorphisms slowly turn these fish into almost grotesque looking creatures with no eyes, lost pigments and no scales on the one hand, but with enhanced alternative sensory […]
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In Development this week (Vol. 142, Issue 4)

Posted by on February 10th, 2015

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   Pathways to human hypothalamic neurons The dysfunction of hypothalamic neurons is implicated in a number of common diseases, including obesity, hypertension, and mood and sleep disorders. To date, studies of human hypothalamic neurons have been limited due to their inaccessibility, but now (on p. […]
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Specifying stem cells, specifically

Posted by on February 5th, 2015

Bone marrow transplants save lives. It’s as simple as that. The reason bone marrow transplants are so effective is because this squishy tissue is home to haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which spend their lives happily producing every single blood cell that will ever circulate around your body. As a result, if anything goes wrong with […]
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BSDB Gurdon Summer Studentship Report (3)

Posted by on February 3rd, 2015

In 2014, the British Society of Developmental Biology (BSDB) has initiated the Gurdon Summer Studentship program with the intention to provide highly motivated students with exceptional qualities and a strong interest in Developmental Biology an opportunity to engage in practical research. The 10 successful applicants spent 8 weeks in the research laboratories of their choices, […]
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Stem cells…now showing in 3D

Posted by on January 22nd, 2015

    Growing organs in vitro is one of the ultimate dreams of any stem cell biologist. As such, it seems obvious that some of these organs will need to be grown in 3D. This is why stem cell 3D culture systems are very fashionable among scientists. They are increasingly successful and a fair amount […]
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In Development this week (Vol. 142, Issue 3)

Posted by on January 20th, 2015

Here are the highlights from the new issue of Development:   Invadosomes: aiding axonal invasion Invasive cells such as immune and metastatic cancer cells form protrusions known as invadosomes, which mediate adhesion to the underlying substrate and induce extracellular matrix degradation – thus promoting invasiveness. On p. 486, Timothy Gomez and colleagues demonstrate that invadosomes […]
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In Development this week (Vol. 142, Issue 2)

Posted by on January 6th, 2015

Here are the highlights from the new issue of Development:   The ‘second brain’: taking gut development up a Notch The vertebrate gastro-intestinal (GI) tract consists of a regionalized epithelial tube surrounded by mesenchyme that later differentiates into smooth muscle. During the early stages of stomach patterning in chick embryos, the primitive GI track is […]
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The rabbit blastocyst modelling (for) vertebrate gastrulation

Posted by on January 5th, 2015

Form and function of animal gastrulation have been longstanding classics accompanying the rise of experimental embryology, and – as if to square the circle in the literal sense – the blastopore of Haeckel’s original ‘gastrea’ stage[1] was soon (and still is) considered analogous to the straight primitive streak of birds and mammals[2-4]. Both forms are […]
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Of mice and men: exploring Mouse ENCODE

Posted by on December 17th, 2014

The Mouse ENCODE Project released a slew of papers late last month reporting findings from a three-year effort to comprehensively map functional elements in the mouse genome. Their major findings are summarized in an integrative paper in Nature (Yue, F. et. al., 2014). Similar to the goals of the human ENCODE project (The ENCODE Project Consortium, […]
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