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Venn, Euler, upset: visualize overlaps in datasets

Posted by on May 25th, 2018

Visualizations for comparing datasets is a topic in all my data viz classes. Current solutions for comparing 2,3, 4 and more datasets are diverse and some are controversial. A one-fits-all solution does not exist, but there are well-working solutions, and some that should be avoided. 1-3 datasets Comparing two or three datasets works well in[…]

The story of my PhD…

Posted by on May 25th, 2018

(Chapter II – The Travelling Fellowship)   Hi! My name is André Dias and I am a PhD student in Portugal. I work in a wonderful institute called Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, under the supervision of Moisés Mallo. I started my PhD at the beginning of 2017 and since then it has been a fantastic[…]

Studentship available in Claudio Stern’s lab

Posted by on May 24th, 2018

Primary supervisor: Professor Claudio Stern FMedSci FRS, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London Project title: “Dynamics of cell behaviour during somite formation”   A studentship funded by the Anatomical Society is available in Claudio Stern’s lab. The project will study the mechanisms of somite formation, to elucidate the molecular and physical mechanisms[…]

DanStem embarks on a strategic partnership with Helmholtz Zentrum München

Posted by on May 23rd, 2018

Translational stem cell research for type 1 diabetes therapy is in prime focus with a new strategic alliance between The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Stem Cell Biology (DanStem) and Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU). Through the establishment of a strong R&D platform for manufacturing of human pluripotent stem cell-derived pancreatic islet cells for future stem[…]

From basic questions to exciting findings

Posted by on May 21st, 2018

In this post we report the backstories behind our recently published paper. It was an enjoyable research adventure driven by discussions, readings, exciting experiments and unexpected discoveries. As a result, we described a novel molecular mechanism underpinning stem cell and progenitor maintenance during development. Here is the sequence of the main events that inspired us[…]

Borders and communities: solving old puzzles with new tools

Posted by on May 10th, 2018

An important question in developmental biology is how regions with distinct identity are established despite the intermingling of cells that occurs during growth and morphogenesis. Our recent work revisited some old studies of how the vertebrate hindbrain is patterned, and found that sharp and homogeneous segments are formed through a combination of identity switching and[…]

The dorsal root of the matter: Using zebrafish to study the importance of movement on early brain growth

Posted by on May 8th, 2018

In our recent paper published in eLife, we found a novel form of movement-dependent neural feedback that drives early forebrain growth in zebrafish. In this article, I discuss the problems, solutions, and lucky breaks that led to our finding. I also end up giving the mighty zebrafish larvae the credit it so deserves.   A[…]

Redefining the Aging Process

Posted by on May 4th, 2018

This post highlights the approach and findings of a new research article published in Disease Models and Mechanisms (DMM). This feature was written by J. Brucker Nourse Jr. as part of a graduate level seminar at The University of Alabama (taught by DMM Editorial Board member, Prof. Guy Caldwell) on current topics related to use[…]

Postdoc Position – Taneyhill Lab, University of Maryland (near Washington DC)

Posted by on April 24th, 2018

A position (#123768) is available immediately for a Postdoctoral Scholar to contribute to our multidisciplinary studies aimed at elucidating the molecular basis of chick neural crest and placode cell development. The postdoc will conduct independent research and assist in the training of students in the laboratory of Dr. Lisa Taneyhill at the University of Maryland. Laboratory[…]

Medaka fish sheds light on the evolutionary origin of vertebrate pair appendages

Posted by on April 23rd, 2018

Link to the paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41588-018-0080-5   The evolutionary history of vertebrate appendages Have you ever wondered how our hands and feet evolved? This question, which commonly evokes fish crawling from sea to land, has long been a subject of interest, both for palaeontologists and developmental biologists. Appendages are an important part of the tool kit[…]