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See for yourCelLf

Posted by on August 18th, 2017

See for yourCelLf “Forget the textbook picture” is what I proclaim when I teach master students in a course on Cell biology and Advanced Microscopy. Although the textbook is a fantastic resource for teaching, it largely fails to convey the complexity of cells, including their size, dynamics and structure. To fully appreciate the intricacies of[…]

In Development this Week (Vol. 144, Issue 15)

Posted by on August 15th, 2017

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   PLCζ ‘waves in’ mammalian oocyte activation At fertilisation, fusion of the sperm with the oocyte activates a slew of downstream processes to kick-start embryogenesis. This ‘oocyte activation’ event induces the cortical reaction to prevent polyspermy, triggers oocyte metabolic and DNA synthesis pathways, and reactivates meiosis. In[…]

Baby cichlids working out their jaws

Posted by on August 14th, 2017

I joined Dr. Craig Albertson’s lab as a graduate student in 2009, where I quickly became fascinated by these cute cichlid fishes. They’re colorful, they breed their young in the mouth, and some of them have funny looking faces like this blue mbuna (Labeotropheus fuelleborni):     My research started on the genetic control of[…]

Discovery Through Collaboration: Brain Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

Posted by on August 8th, 2017

Looking back on the journey: Intracellular uptake of macromolecules by brain lymphatic endothelial cells during zebrafish embryonic development eLife van Lessen et al., 2017   Just over two years ago, while I was a Masters of Neuroscience student at University College London, I became interested in the emerging concepts of brain lymphatics and sleep dependent macromolecule[…]

Making time matter: how hormone pulses direct chromatin accessibility during development

Posted by on August 8th, 2017

Each of our cells has the same genetic information and thus the same potential to become a part of a heart, brain, or a finger. Somehow though, during development our cells manage to figure out exactly which type of cell they should be and which body parts they should help compose. The key to making[…]

In Development this Week (Vol. 144, Issue 15)

Posted by on August 1st, 2017

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   X-citing insights into dosage compensation The non-coding RNA Xist plays a key role in the process of X chromosome inactivation (XCI) and is thus essential for dosage compensation of X-linked genes in females. The 5′ region of Xist RNA contains a conserved element termed the A-repeat that is required for[…]

January 2018: Summer! Beach! New friends and Top Developmental Biologists in course in Chile

Posted by on July 31st, 2017

New fellowships from SDB for students from USA and Canada to attend the International Course on Developmental Biology on January 9-21, 2018 in Quintay Chile. Fellowship for Latin American students will be available as well. Nipam Patel, Alejandro Sanchez-Alvarado, Ray Keller, Claudio Stern, Corinne Huart, Maria Leptin, Andrea Streit, among other will teach, hands-on, the[…]

Research Technician/ Post Graduate for a Zebrafish Laboratory at Yale

Posted by on July 18th, 2017

Provide research assistance for a zebrafish genetics lab The focus of the overall project is to use zebrafish as a model system to study vertebrate development Required: Experience in areas of molecular biology such as DNA cloning, genotyping, PCR, and gel electrophoresis Education and Training: Bachelor’s degree in Biology, or related field of Molecular biology,[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 144, Issue 14)

Posted by on July 18th, 2017

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   Computing branching pattern complexity Bile – a fluid that aids digestion – is transported from the liver to the intestine through the bile duct. Bile reaches the bile duct itself via a complex, highly branched structure called the intrahepatic biliary network. This network spreads[…]

A New (and open-access!) Antibody Search Platform: BenchSci

Posted by on July 13th, 2017

Antibodies are one of the most commonly used research reagents. However, due to their innate variability, finding the right antibody can be a challenge. Scientists devote a significant amount of time sifting through the literature to find antibodies that have been shown to work under specific experimental contexts matching their research interests. This process often[…]