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Insights into the pathogenic role of UVRAG in intestinal dysplasia

Posted by on May 4th, 2016

This post highlights the approach and findings of a new research article published in Disease Models & Mechanisms: ‘Stem cell-specific endocytic degradation defects lead to intestinal dysplasia in Drosophila’. This feature was written by Elan Strange as part of a graduate level seminar at The University of Alabama (taught by DMM Editorial Board member, Prof.[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 143, Issue 9)

Posted by on May 3rd, 2016

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   Making inroads into spermatogonial differentiation Differentiation of spermatogonial cells is a crucial part of spermatogenesis. Many of the key signalling pathways and molecules that are involved in spermatogonial differentiation have been identified, but their precise function at the cellular level as well as their[…]

From our sister journals- April 2016

Posted by on April 29th, 2016

Here is some developmental biology related content from other journals published by The Company of Biologists.           New neural crest EMT reporter Stewart and colleagues describe a novel neural crest EMT reporter for rapid in vivo drug screening in zebrafish. They use to identify a small-molecule EMT inhibitor that blocks this process by activating retinoic[…]

Untangling developmentally programmed obesity: role of the serotonin system

Posted by on April 27th, 2016

This post highlights the approach and findings of a new research article published in Disease Models and Mechanisms (DMM): ‘5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors as hypothalamic targets of developmental programming in male rats’. This feature was written by Richard Seeber as part of a graduate level seminar at The University of Alabama (taught by DMM Editorial Board[…]

Scratching the surface of a rainbow

Posted by on April 26th, 2016

  Why some vertebrates like salamanders and zebrafish are able to regenerate complex tissues while humans cannot is a question that has fascinated biologists for centuries. Understanding how and why regeneration occurs in these animals can inspire novel treatment strategies for regenerative medicine. At the cellular level, the regeneration process is driven by dynamic activities[…]

Gills, fins and the evolution of vertebrate paired appendages

Posted by on April 19th, 2016

The origin of paired fins is a major unresolved issue in vertebrate evolutionary biology, and has been a topic of debate among palaeontologists, comparative anatomists and developmental biologists for over a century. Central to any question of “evolutionary origins” is the concept of homology: the sharing of features due to common ancestry. Homology may explain[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 143, Issue 8)

Posted by on April 19th, 2016

Here are the highlights from the current issue of Development:   The origins of lung macrophages revealed Tissue-resident macrophages are phagocytic cells that are essential for the response to injury and infection. Both within and between tissues, macrophages can show distinct characteristics, but are these attributes developmentally defined or determined by the microenvironment? In the[…]

Light sheet microscopy 101: Get started with a short video protocol

Posted by on April 13th, 2016

Here you can find out more about our video protocol on using light sheet microscopy to image zebrafish eye development.   Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has quickly become a popular technique in developmental biology. This method is very gentle to the samples, with fast acquisition speed and allows capturing the samples from any angle or from[…]

High-pressure tubes

Posted by on April 6th, 2016

Notes on “Intracellular lumen formation in Drosophila proceeds via a novel subcellular compartment” by Linda S. Nikolova and Mark M. Metzstein. Development 2015 142: 3964-3973; doi: 10.1242/dev.127902 In this post, I provide additional details to a paper which we published last year in Development. In particular, I expand on our description on the method of[…]

Forgotten classics- Regulating the size of the mouse embryo

Posted by on April 6th, 2016

  Snow, M. H. L., Tam, P. P. L. (1979) Is compensatory growth a complicating factor in mouse teratology? Nature 279, 555-557 Lewis, N. E., Rossant, J. (1982) Mechanism of size regulation in mouse embryo aggregates J. Embryol. exp. Morph 72, 169-181 Recommended by James Briscoe (Francis Crick Institute)     As our previous forgotten[…]