the community site for and by developmental biologists

A career in publishing: a developing story

Posted by on January 25th, 2011

In a follow up to Eva’s first post in our alternative careers series about how a research background in developmental biology can lead to a career path that lies outside of research, I hope that my description here of how I made the move from a PhD in developmental genetics to a career in publishing[…]

Just because it looks like a duct, doesn’t mean it is the duct

Posted by on January 25th, 2011

The Node’s staff has kindly given me the opportunity to write a background piece, placing into context the results of our studies described in the paper, “Sox9+ ductal cells are multipotent progenitors throughout development but do not produce new endocrine cells in the normal or injured adult pancreas” (released today in Development; http://dev.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/dev.056499). For many[…]

Double bill: Bringin’ Stickleback / Bad Project

Posted by on January 24th, 2011

Is this Monday not quite giving you the results you were hoping for? Cheer up with a few science music videos. This one, “Bad Project”, is being emailed around rapidly among scientists worldwide, so there’s a good chance you’ve already seen it. If not, it’s worth a watch for the costumes (made of lab supplies!)[…]

Skip your postdoc?

Posted by on January 20th, 2011

A friend of mine went straight from his PhD in computational (pharmaco)chemistry to an investigator position, and I have heard an unconfirmed second-hand story of one other person recently making this transition in a life science related area. But by and large, most PI jobs require that you have done at least one postdoc, and[…]

Conference announcement: Advances in stem cell research: Development, Regeneration & Disease in Paris, France

Posted by on January 19th, 2011

Announcement for the Advances in stem cell research: Development, Regeneration & Disease conference at the Pasteur Institute, Paris, April 6-8, 2011.

RNAi in the Nucleus ~ It’s no longer limited to the cytoplasm

Posted by on January 18th, 2011

Hot off the press from the holidays is an article from PNAS that’s worth a gander if you’re into RNAi. We know RNAi associated with epigenetics is possible in the nucleus (Somehow, siRNAs could trigger the methylation and silencing of genes in the nucleus.) However, one soy bean group was able to provide evidence for[…]

Citing Data

Posted by on January 17th, 2011

I just got back from attending two meetings about academia and the internet – one in person and the second, in true internet style, virtually. Both meetings at one point or another discussed the growing trend toward archiving and citing data itself (on top of citing the papers written based on analysis of the data).[…]

Arrested Development in Plant miRNA Mutants

Posted by on January 11th, 2011

Animals and Plants have hundreds of miRNAs with diverse roles in gene regulation. In humans, each miRNA family can control up to several hundred genes (or 500 to be exact, in humans). A loss of function in one, can lead to array of developmental defects. Similarly in plants, an miRNA mutant can have a variety of phenotypes. However, interestingly, many miRNAs only have one target, which is frequently a transcription factor that in turn, controls many genes itself. It’s really like a house of cards.

Royal Society Stem Cell Meeting talks online

Posted by on January 11th, 2011

The Royal Society has uploaded audio files of almost all the talks of their Discussion Meeting last October: “2010: What Next for Stem Cell Biology?”. Unfortunately there are no slides to look at (as far as I can tell) so some of the more technical talks may be hard to follow, but if you’re already[…]

Open access video protocol: electroporating zebrafish ears

Posted by on January 10th, 2011

Open-access video protocol for electroporating into zebrafish ears