the community site for and by developmental biologists

Genetics Unzipped: Is there such a thing as a perfect genome? Myths and misconceptions in genomics

Posted by on March 13th, 2020

In this episode, we’re taking a look at some of the common myths and misconceptions surrounding genomics and genetic tests.

Labs in lockdown

Posted by on March 13th, 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has led to travel restrictions, conference cancellations and university closures. How do labs function in various states of lockdown? What happens to model organisms and long running experiments? On the personal side, how can we counter the loss of lab camaraderie? And education – how can you run a course from home?[…]

BSDB meeting cancelled

Posted by on March 10th, 2020

Here at the Node and Development, the BSDB Spring meeting is always the first thing to go into our conference calendar, as an institution for the UK developmental biology community. The 2020 meeting, co-organised with the Genetics Society and due to start on Sunday, has just been cancelled due to concerns about spread of Covid-19[…]

Cells of Knowledge: Collaborative effort of scientists and animators

Posted by on March 5th, 2020

An interdiciplenary collaboration of scientists from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Stem Cell Biology and animators in Denmark is aiming to facilitate a dialogue between the two diciplines, and ultimately disseminate stem cell research to different segments of the society. The primary objectives are: To train scientists to pitch scientific stories to non-scientists, and[…]

DanStem Podcast with Uri Manor, Salk inst.

Posted by on March 3rd, 2020

The DanStem podcast team had the privilege to host Uri Manor from Salk Institute for Biological Studies in an inspiring podcast https://lnkd.in/ezVrBNV about deep-learning, image analysis, science communication and a few good tips to junior investigators.  Uri Manor’s primary focus is the integration and application of optical and charged particle detection technologies to study problems[…]

February in preprints

Posted by on March 2nd, 2020

Welcome to our monthly trawl for developmental biology (and related) preprints.  February’s haul features blooming orchids, regenerating lungfish and human intestines, and also lots of interesting stuff in the ‘Research practice and education section’, from preprint impacts to the dominance of the English language in science. They were hosted on bioRxiv and arXiv. Let us know if we[…]

Genetics Unzipped – Poop, pus and the Manhattan Project: how we learned to spell the genetic alphabet

Posted by on February 27th, 2020

The genetic code is written in just four ‘letters – A, C, T and G, short for adenine, cytosine, thymine and guanine. But where did they come from? To find out, we need to go back to the Bird Poop Boom of the 1840s.

Moving neuromuscular disorders research forward: from novel models to clinical studies

Posted by on February 27th, 2020

This Editorial by Maaike van Putten, Julija Hmeljak, Annemieke Aartsma-Rus and James J. Dowling was recently published in Development’s sister journal Disease Models & Mechanisms, announcing a new Special Issue. Neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) encompass a diverse group of genetic diseases characterized by loss of muscle functionality. Despite extensive efforts to develop therapies, no curative treatment[…]

2020 Santa Cruz Developmental Biology Meeting

Posted by on February 26th, 2020

From the 2020 SCDB organizing committee (Sally Horne-Badovinac, Sean Megason and Zhu Wang). See also a Node report from the 2018 edition, and an interview with 2018 SCBD Young Investigator Award Winner, Vilaiwan Fernandes.   We are pleased to announce the 2020 Santa Cruz Developmental Biology Meeting, which will be held August 8-12 on the[…]

Meeting Development, Evolution & Anatomy, FREE, NYU 18 May 2020

Posted by on February 25th, 2020

Come for free, participate in our round table discussions, and honor a great scientist and person. Free and open to anyone interested, with an amazing list of speakers and talks, as none of the most renowned scientists in the field that was invited wanted to miss this unique opportunity to honor the amazing Drew Noden.[…]