the community site for and by developmental biologists

Genetics Unzipped podcast: In case you missed it…

Posted by on August 29th, 2019

We look back over the first 20 episodes of Genetics Unzipped to select some of our favourite bits that you might have missed.

Travelling Fellowships from The Company of Biologists: Apply now!

Posted by on August 28th, 2019

The Company of Biologists’ journals – Development, Journal of Cell Science, Journal of Experimental Biology and Disease Models & Mechanisms – offer Travelling Fellowships of up to £2,500 to graduate students and post-doctoral researchers wishing to make collaborative visits to other laboratories. These are designed to offset the cost of travel and other expenses. There is no restriction on nationality. They really[…]

A podcast with Professor Anne Grapin-Botton

Posted by on August 22nd, 2019

Anne Grapin-Botton has a background in developmental biology and initially studied nervous system and endoderm development. Her laboratory is currently focusing on pancreas development with the overall goals of understanding how pancreatic cells differentiate during embryogenesis, and determining what limits the pancreatic cells’ regeneration in adults. Anne Grapin-Botton is a Director and a Group Leader at[…]

Discovering the Genetic Basis of Mimetic Color Diversity in Bumble Bees

Posted by on August 20th, 2019

As a first-year graduate student, I had the good fortune of accompanying Dr. Pierre Rasmont (U. Mons, Belgium) and his lab group on an expedition to collect bumble bees in Turkey. At our first stop onto the dry but flower-rich volcanic lands, we each dispersed to collect bees. At the time I was working to[…]

Genetics Unzipped podcast: Sex and death

Posted by on August 15th, 2019

We’re telling tales of sex and death, and exploring the very darkest side of genetics.

The people behind the papers – Shai Eyal and Elazar Zelzer

Posted by on August 13th, 2019

This interview, the 67th in our series, was recently published in Development Most bones in the vertebrate skeleton are made in the same way – endochondrial ossification – yet they display a variety of shapes and sizes. The question of how these unique bone morphologies, including the superstructures that protrude from their surfaces, arise during development is[…]

Turning back the clock of neural progenitor cells: a simple recipe to generate de novo retinal ganglion cells

Posted by on August 12th, 2019

Press release for a new Development paper on reprogramming in the retina. Scientists at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Germany, discovered that a single transcription factor drives retinal progenitor cells to reacquire the potency to generate Retinal ganglion cells. The[…]

CRISPR-Cas9 – what’s left to know?

Posted by on August 8th, 2019

This post was originally posted on the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine’s blog Dominic Owens, PhD student in the De Bruijn group at MRC MHU, recounts how puzzling results and a fortuitous lab meeting uncovered unexpected outcomes of CRISPR editing and changed the direction of his research.   It’s May 2018 and I’m feeling nervous. I was[…]

Cancer Research UK’s new investment in paediatric cancer research

Posted by on August 8th, 2019

We are increasing our investment in paediatric cancer research by launching two new significant funding calls. We would like to encourage proposals to investigate the following concepts amongst others- the basis of tumour initiation and progression novel models that would enhance pre-clinical research. Please see the links below for the complete list.   The Cancer[…]

A day in the life of an onychophoran lab

Posted by on August 7th, 2019

What are onychophorans and why do we study them? My name is Sandra Treffkorn, and I recently finished my PhD in the department of zoology lead by Georg Mayer at the University of Kassel, Germany. In our research group, we focus on studying the evolution of animal diversity by investigating two very interesting but largely[…]