the community site for developmental biologists

Displaying posts in the category: Discussion [Clear Filter]

Mole- So now you have your own lab! Part V- The plan

Posted by on September 2nd, 2015

This cartoon was first published in the Journal of Cell Science. Read other articles and cartoons of Mole & Friends here.     Part I- ‘The imposter’ Part II- ‘The teaching monster’ Part III- ‘The Pact’ Part IV- ‘The fit’ (+1 rating, 1 votes) Loading…

The case of philanthropy: bringing scientists and philanthropic donors together, for good

Posted by on August 28th, 2015

This editorial by Olivia Flatto was first published in Disease Models & Mechanisms.   Wealth is not new. Neither is charity. But the idea of using private wealth imaginatively, constructively, and systematically to attack the fundamental problems of mankind is new.” – John Gardner   Philanthropy, derived from private wealth, stands unique as a vital source of[…]

Question of the month- peer review

Posted by on August 27th, 2015

This week the BioMedCentral blog put together a quiz to test how good you are at assessing the best course of action when faced with tricky peer review scenarios. These scenarios make for a fun exercise, but similar situations can and are encountered by you when invited to review manuscripts. However (like many other tasks that are asked from researchers)[…]

On progressing your career and communicating your science- Advice from the SDB meeting

Posted by on August 17th, 2015

Last month I attended the SDB annual meeting in Utah, an excellent conference that featured great scientific talks and additional educative sessions covering outreach, inclusiveness and more. I tweeted extensively from the Node’s twitter account, but as many of the readers of the Node are not on twitter, I realised that you may have missed out[…]

The importance of indifference in scientific research

Posted by on August 3rd, 2015

This essay by Martin Schwartz was originally published in the Journal of Cell Science.   Current issues regarding scientific ethics have focused for the most part on regulations governing research and publication. I suggest that the internal process by which we separate self interest from the scientific process is a crucial and neglected part of training.[…]

Question of the month- interdisciplinary research

Posted by on July 29th, 2015

Developmental biology is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary, as biologists team up with physicists and mathematicians to address new and classical problems in the field from a new perspective. But should we all be pursuing such an approach or is there still room for ‘pure’ developmental biology approaches? Should we incorporate more physics/mathematics modules in the training of[…]

Embracing risk

Posted by on July 27th, 2015

This editorial by Ross Cagan was first published in Disease Models & Mechanisms.   I entered the science field because I imagined that scientists were society’s “professional risk takers”, that they like surfing out on the edge. I understood that a lot of science – perhaps even most science – has to be a solid exploration[…]

Mole- So now you have your own lab! Part IV – The fit

Posted by on July 27th, 2015

This cartoon was first published in the Journal of Cell Science. Read other articles and cartoons of Mole & Friends here.     Part I- ‘The imposter’ Part II- ‘The teaching monster’ Part III- ‘The Pact’ (+2 rating, 2 votes) Loading…

European Advanced School for Mouse Phenogenomics – pushing the boundaries of mouse genetics

Posted by on July 24th, 2015

The laboratory mouse has been a popular model in mammalian biology for obvious reasons and it has contributed to a number of landmark discoveries in biomedical research. Despite this, few courses and summer schools – which train future leaders in this field – focus on mouse genetics. Phenomin, a large-scale French national infrastructure for biology[…]

99 (imaging) problems

Posted by on July 17th, 2015

  Last week, the SDB hosted what may well have been its highest annual meeting – at 8000 feet – in Snowbird, Utah. The atmosphere was fantastic, the talks were phenomenal, and the scenery was just obscene. It was an all-around great meeting, topped with a choir of singing PIs after the conference dinner. Couldn’t get better. If you missed[…]