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Echoes of “Chromatin-Based Regulation of Development” workshop OR “to TAD or not to TAD”?

Posted by on May 14th, 2019

The non-profit publishing groups can make a real difference The very best part of being a scientist is cracking mysteries of the universe and what is in it. The second best thing about this profession, in my opinion, is being part of a scientific community. Conversations, conferences, workshops, collaborations, networking, support and constant inspiration from[…]

Meeting report of the Cambridge Fly Club Symposium – Past, Present and Future of Drosophila Research

Posted by on May 10th, 2019

By Ghislain Gillard, Maria J. Gomez Lamarca, Robert Krautz, Rosa Park, David Salvador-Garcia, Yara Sanchez-Corrales and Jelle van den Ameele   On the 28th of January, the Cambridge Fly Club held its very first Symposium in the beautiful environment of Wolfson College, Cambridge, UK. This meeting, titled “Past, Present and Future of Drosophila research” was[…]

Publishing Fly Research

Posted by on May 9th, 2019

Back in January, The Cambridge Fly Club held a symposium to mark 25 years since the publication of the famous Gal4/UAS paper (Brand & Perrimon, 1993 – published in Development); the organisers have posted a meeting report here. As part of this symposium, the organisers asked me to give a talk on ‘Publishing Fly Research’.[…]

Forces maintain order between cells

Posted by on April 30th, 2019

Written by Antoine Fruleux and Arezki Boudaoud As Lewis Wolpert put it (Wolpert, PLoS Biology 2010), if you extend your two arms, you will likely find that they match in length by better than 0.2%, though they do not seem to directly communicate during their development and growth. Similarly, flowers in an individual plant are[…]

Imaging by computer and drawing by hand

Posted by on March 19th, 2019

An artist and a cultural historian of science visiting the European Molecular Biology Lab (EMBL) Gemma Anderson (University of Exeter) and Janina Wellmann (MECS, Leuphana University Lüneburg) Since Steve Woolgar’s and Bruno Latour’s study Laboratory Life was published in 1979 it has become part of the repertoire of STS scholars and anthropologists to visit the[…]

Preprints and science news – how can they co-exist? A meeting summary

Posted by on February 25th, 2019

Mate Palfy & Gautam Dey   In the summer of 2018, two commentaries from the Science Media Center (an open letter from Chief Executive Fiona Fox and a ‘World View’ in Nature news by Senior Press Manager Tom Sheldon) voiced concerns about how preprints in the life sciences could pose a potential threat to science[…]

Genetics Unzipped podcast – 006 – Big Fat Failure

Posted by on February 23rd, 2019

In this episode we’re looking at the genetics of failure – why we fail to lose weight thanks to our genes, and why ignoring genetic information and DNA diversity leads to billions of dollars being wasted on drugs that don’t work. Cambridge University neuroscientist Giles Yeo talks about his new book, Gene Eating: The science[…]

Improving the visibility of developmental biology: time for induction and specification

Posted by on February 6th, 2019

This Spotlight article by Len Zon originally appeared in Development as part of our ‘Advocating developmental biology‘ campaign. We’d love to hear what you think about Len’s ideas. Developmental biology is a prominent field that has captured the imagination of many scientists. Over the years, research in the area has seen a steady number of[…]

Experimenting with non-anonymous peer review

Posted by on February 3rd, 2019

Last year, I started to experiment with signing my reports for peer review of manuscripts, inspired by other people on twitter (@kaymtye, @AndrewPlested who in turn were inspired by Leslie Voshall). This year, the experiment is a bit different. I will only review for journals that allow non-anonymous peer-review. Why? That was the question raised[…]

The reported birth of CRISPR-edited humans: reactions from the field

Posted by on November 29th, 2018

One scientific story has dominated the news this week: the first report of CRISPR-edited human babies being born. In an associated Node post, we’ve collected the most useful links we could find surrounding the story, and here we reached out to members of the community for their perspectives. Some responses are hopefully still coming in[…]