the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts in the category: Discussion [Clear Filter]

The reported birth of CRISPR-edited humans: reactions from the field

Posted by on November 29th, 2018

One scientific story has dominated the news this week: the first report of CRISPR-edited human babies being born. In an associated Node post, we’ve collected the most useful links we could find surrounding the story, and here we reached out to members of the community for their perspectives. Some responses are hopefully still coming in[…]

Translational science: drawing the line

Posted by on November 6th, 2018

Humankind has been researching and engineering for as long as we have existed. It was a matter of survival back then and it is still is nowadays. This long and involved process that spanned over several millennia has enabled civilisations to rise and fall. Thousands of years of science and scholarly traditions have led to[…]

Single cell ecology meeting

Posted by on October 30th, 2018

The Royal Society is organising the upcoming Single cell ecology meeting on 10-11 December 2018 in London, UK, on behalf of Professor Thomas Richards, Dr Ramon Massana and Professor Neil Hall. This will be an interdisciplinary meeting to explore the use of single cell technologies to understand the function, diversity and interactions of microbes. This[…]

Zebrafish knock-ins swim into the mainstream

Posted by on October 25th, 2018

This Editorial by Sergey Prykhozhij and Jason Berman originally appeared in Disease Models and Mechanisms, an online Open Access sister journal to Development focusing on the use of model systems to better understand, diagnose and treat human disease. The Editorial focuses on three new papers on point mutant knock ins in zebrafish, and will thus be of interest[…]

Revisiting an old puzzle with high-resolution, three-dimensional eyes

Posted by on September 19th, 2018

Sha Wang, Deborah Gumucio This article shares the story behind our recent Developmental Cell paper. It tells the history of this project and how three-dimensional (3D) observations at the individual cell level transformed our preconceived ideas and brought new insights into cell dynamics in the proliferative intestinal epithelium.   Epithelial tubes are present in many[…]

Publishing peer review reports

Posted by on September 5th, 2018

Last week, Development and our sister journal Journal of Cell Science signed an open letter coordinated by ASAPbio, signalling our intention to publish peer review reports alongside published papers. I’m really delighted to be making this commitment and wanted to take the opportunity to say a few words about our thinking behind this decision. So[…]

Why We Need More Women in Academia: An Undergraduate Interested in Developmental Biology

Posted by on August 28th, 2018

For some scientists, the decision to pursue a research career stems from a youthful curiosity for the natural world that gradually builds over many years. Whereas in others, there is single moment when they realize that their desired future involved research. My interest is a mix of both – I decided I was going to[…]

Preprints promote transparency and communication

Posted by on August 12th, 2018

Carmen Adriaens1, Gautam Dey2, Amanda Haage3, Wouter Masselink4 *, Sundar Ram Naganathan5, Lauren Neves6, Teresa Rayon7, Samantha Seah8, Srivats Venkataramanan9.   1. Center for Cancer Biology, VIB, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium & Center for Cancer Research, NCI/NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA 2. MRC Lab for Molecular Cell Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK 3. Department[…]

Stem cell makes its own niche: the story behind the paper

Posted by on July 7th, 2018

In our recent paper published in Nature, we unravel a new mechanism of an extracellular matrix protein secreted by muscle satellite (stem) cells, thereby playing the unusual role of acting as a signaling molecule to maintain the stem cell population. Here, I share the story behind this discovery and discuss the questions related to niche[…]

Towards understanding the quirks of human brain evolution

Posted by on June 28th, 2018

In early June, a group of 30 world-leading experts came together thanks to an invitation by the Company of Biologists to Wiston House (Sussex, UK) to discuss our current understanding about evolutionary and molecular mechanisms that contributed to developing the specific qualities of our human brains. Fortunately, the Company of Biologists offers fully funded participation[…]