the community site for developmental biologists

Displaying posts in the category: Discussion [Clear Filter]

The importance of indifference in scientific research

Posted by on August 3rd, 2015

This essay by Martin Schwartz was originally published in the Journal of Cell Science.   Current issues regarding scientific ethics have focused for the most part on regulations governing research and publication. I suggest that the internal process by which we separate self interest from the scientific process is a crucial and neglected part of training.[…]

Question of the month- interdisciplinary research

Posted by on July 29th, 2015

Developmental biology is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary, as biologists team up with physicists and mathematicians to address new and classical problems in the field from a new perspective. But should we all be pursuing such an approach or is there still room for ‘pure’ developmental biology approaches? Should we incorporate more physics/mathematics modules in the training of[…]

Embracing risk

Posted by on July 27th, 2015

This editorial by Ross Cagan was first published in Disease Models & Mechanisms.   I entered the science field because I imagined that scientists were society’s “professional risk takers”, that they like surfing out on the edge. I understood that a lot of science – perhaps even most science – has to be a solid exploration[…]

Mole’s Wow! So now you have your own lab! Part IV – The fit

Posted by on July 27th, 2015

This cartoon was first published in the Journal of Cell Science. Read other articles and cartoons of Mole & Friends here.     Part I- ‘The imposter’ Part II- ‘The teaching monster’ Part III- ‘The Pact’ (+2 rating, 2 votes) Loading…

European Advanced School for Mouse Phenogenomics – pushing the boundaries of mouse genetics

Posted by on July 24th, 2015

The laboratory mouse has been a popular model in mammalian biology for obvious reasons and it has contributed to a number of landmark discoveries in biomedical research. Despite this, few courses and summer schools – which train future leaders in this field – focus on mouse genetics. Phenomin, a large-scale French national infrastructure for biology[…]

99 (imaging) problems

Posted by on July 17th, 2015

  Last week, the SDB hosted what may well have been its highest annual meeting – at 8000 feet – in Snowbird, Utah. The atmosphere was fantastic, the talks were phenomenal, and the scenery was just obscene. It was an all-around great meeting, topped with a choir of singing PIs after the conference dinner. Couldn’t get better. If you missed[…]

On women

Posted by on July 16th, 2015

I first wrote this for an anonymous blog. After a nudge, I have decided to publish it here. Parts of it have been embellished to make the point in the name of journalistic integrity. Please forgive me if I cause any offence. None is intended.   This is the first entry of this blog, and[…]

Question of the month- societies

Posted by on June 30th, 2015

Last week the International Society for Stem Cell Biology meeting took place in Stockholm, and next week is the turn of the Society for Developmental Biology meeting, in Utah.  However, an annual meeting is not the only thing that a society may do. Other activities can include, for example, the publication of a peer-reviewed journal, advocacy for[…]

The human sex ratio at conception and the conception of scientific “facts”

Posted by on June 9th, 2015

Few things interest many people more than sex. For some, this means interest in practices and partners. For others, it means producing a son. There is an ocean of claims about how to do this. A quick Google search reveals claims that a woman can up the odds of a son by taking cough syrup,[…]

When Basic Science Intersects with Disease, and Patients

Posted by on May 29th, 2015

Developmental biologist Gabrielle Kardon, Ph.D., never thought that she would be explaining morphogenesis to patient support groups, but that’s where her science led her. And instead of shying away, she has embraced it. Completely. Kardon’s lab had focused mostly on the limb until her graduate student, Allyson Merrell, urged that they explore the diaphragm, of[…]