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Displaying posts in the category: Highlights [Clear Filter]

October in preprints

Posted by on November 1st, 2018

Welcome to our monthly trawl for developmental biology (and related) preprints.  This month we decided to reinstate our Plant Development section after a Twitter chat, and as it happened October had a glut of preprints covering all aspects of plant development. You’ll also find lots of regeneration (kidneys, colons, eyes, axons and whole colonial tunicates),[…]

This month in preLights – September

Posted by on October 12th, 2018

Welcome to our monthly summary of developmental biology (and related) preLights.   It’s been almost eight months since the launch of preLights, and we are very excited about the hugely positive response from the community so far and preLights’ rapid growth – we recently reached two hundred preprint highlights! To further grow this service, we[…]

September in preprints

Posted by on October 3rd, 2018

Welcome to our monthly trawl for developmental biology (and related) preprints.  Another month, another net full of exciting science. Look out for WNT vampires, regenerating lampreys, polarising ctenophores, plus investigations into niche architecture, tissue mechanics and the dynamics of developmental signalling. The preprints were hosted on bioRxiv, PeerJ, and arXiv. Let us know if we missed anything, and use[…]

Autonomous traffic – Wnt cytonemes lead the way.

Posted by on October 2nd, 2018

by Lauren Porter and Steffen Scholpp Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter, UK   The importance of Wnt signalling in developmental processes, wound healing and stem cell control has long been established. Historically, scientists attributed the transport of Wnt proteins from the source to the receiver cell to simple diffusion, however, this explanation did not[…]

Clone Wars: A New Model

Posted by on October 1st, 2018

From the MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine blog.   Stem cell turnover and tissue maintenance is a stochastic process. This means that a randomly occurring mutation has an unknown chance of becoming fixed and spreading within a tissue. Clonal mutations have been observed in apparently healthy tissue, increase in frequency with age and –[…]

Nora and Nestor catch you up with the BSDB Autumn Meeting 2018

Posted by on September 19th, 2018

  Hello there! This is Nora Braak and Nestor Saiz, we are based in Oxford and New York respectively and we study butterfly and mouse development. Last week we went to the BSDB Autumn meeting, which also happened to be the third workshop on Embryonic Extraembryonic Interactions. We enjoyed it so much that we wanted[…]

This month in preLights – August

Posted by on September 5th, 2018

Welcome to our monthly summary of developmental biology (and related) preLights.   preLighters are early-career researchers who select and highlight preprints which they feel are interesting for the life-science community. While writing highlight posts is mostly an individual effort, plenty of interactions between the preLights team members take place on our Slack channel. This is[…]

August in preprints

Posted by on September 3rd, 2018

Welcome to our monthly trawl for developmental biology (and other related/just plain cool) preprints.    This month we found a tonne of  papers dealing with various aspects of inheritance in worms, a flush of fly mechanics, and more single cell sequencing than you could shake a stick at. And as summer draws to a close, it’s raining[…]

Pitx2c sets the stage for gastrulation

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

In our recently published paper https://elifesciences.org/articles/34880, we report that the transcription factor Pitx2c has an unexpected role during gastrulation, where it acts cell non-autonomously to promote mesendodermal cell migration required for axis extension in zebrafish.     “It is not birth, marriage or death which is the most important time in your life, but gastrulation. –[…]

The Age-Long Quest for Bone Length Regulation

Posted by on August 9th, 2018

About a decade ago I came to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to work with my mentor, Jeff Baron, to study childhood growth and to tackle one of the unsolved mysteries in biology – mechanisms for body size determination (1). Years have passed, and we probably still don’t understand what makes an elephant an[…]