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PhD position in Queen Mary University of London: Evolution of axis specification in annelid worms

Posted by on February 23rd, 2018

A PhD studentship is available for a project on the evolution of axis specification modes in spiral cleaving animals. The project will focus on the annelid species Owenia fusiformis, which occupies a key phylogenetic position as the sister lineage to all remaining annelids, and it has recently proven very informative for the study of animal[…]

Postdoc position (Francis Crick Institute, London): Developmental origins of health and longevity

Posted by on February 20th, 2018

An exciting opportunity to be part of a pioneering biomedical research institute, dedicated to innovation and science. A postdoctoral research post in the laboratory of Dr. Alex P. Gould is now available. We are looking for a highly motivated researcher to identify the, as yet unknown, molecular mechanisms by which dietary nutrients and oxidative stress[…]

Post Doctoral Position on Pancreas Development and Stem Cells

Posted by on January 15th, 2018

Post Doctoral Researcher  German Centre for Diabetes Research Dresden A post-doctoral position is available in the research group of Dr Anthony Gavalas. The group investigates the role of signaling pathways and metabolism in the late stages of endocrine pancreas development, the application of novel signals for the conversion of human pluripotent stem cells into functional[…]

Developmental biology: ‘not a confined, specified discipline’?

Posted by on January 10th, 2018

Catching up after the holidays, I finally got around to reading Scott Gilbert‘s recently published essay in PloS Biology. In case you haven’t seen it yet, the essay proposes that developmental biology is ‘the stem cell of biological disciplines’, and that many other areas of biology – such as cell biology, genetics, immunology, oncology and[…]

This year for Christmas, gift yourself with an amazing experience. Apply today for the 2018 CSHL Cell and Developmental Biology of Xenopus course.

Posted by on December 18th, 2017

The end of the year is quickly approaching, and if you are anything like me you are scrambling to try to get as much work done as possible before your holiday break. But while this frequently entails getting papers submitted, committee meetings completed, and experiments wrapped up, I also take the opportunity to reflect on[…]

An interview with Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard

Posted by on November 3rd, 2017

This interview by Katherine Brown originally appeared in Development, Vol 144 Issue 21 Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard is Director Emeritus at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, Germany. In 1995, she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine, along with Eric Wieschaus and Edward Lewis, for her work on the genetic control[…]

Glia lead the way for pioneers to build the brain neuropil in C. elegans

Posted by on October 20th, 2017

It’s all about the wires. But what about the glue? Networks make us who we are. I am not talking about social networks but about neural networks that define how we perceive the world and how we act. For a century, neuroscientists have sought to understand functions of neural networks in condition and how such[…]

Manchester PhD position on neuronal development, ageing & degeneration

Posted by on October 17th, 2017

The University of Manchester, 2018/19 BBSRC DTP PhD Project Understanding tubulin regulation during neuronal development, ageing and degeneration Axons are slender, up-to-a-meter long, cable-like extensions of neurons which form the nerves and nerve tracts that wire our bodies and brain. These delicate cellular structures have to be maintained for an organism’s life time and are[…]

Layered patterning systems in hair development

Posted by on September 28th, 2017

The story behind our recent paper  ‘Hierarchical patterning modes orchestrate hair follicle morphogenesis‘ , finding that distinct patterning mechanisms can co-exist during embryonic organ formation.   From the spots of a leopard and stripes on a zebra to the pigmentation of sea shells and arrangement of sand dunes in a desert, repeating patterns are present[…]

An interview with George Daley

Posted by on September 22nd, 2017

This interview by Aidan Maartens appeared in Development, Vol 144 Issue 18 George Daley is Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, and Caroline Shields Walker Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. A former Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and President of the International Society for Stem Cell[…]