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Postdoctoral opportunity in image analysis and biophysical modeling of developing systems

Posted by on January 8th, 2019

Postdoctoral position in the Saunders laboratory, Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore A postdoctoral research position in quantitative biology is available from March 2019 in Asst. Prof. Timothy Saunders’ group at the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore. The Saunders lab has been active since 2013 and studies the fundamental processes shaping organs and tissues during development. The Saunders lab extensively[…]

Postdoctoral position in Chromatin and Epigenetics in Drosophila Development

Posted by on December 19th, 2018

Stockholm University, Sweden, invites applications for one postdoctoral position in the laboratory of Professor Mattias Mannervik at the Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute (http://www.su.se/mbw). The position is scheduled to start as soon as possible. Transcriptional coregulators are proteins that facilitate communication between transcription factors and the basal transcription apparatus, in part by affecting[…]

Wire together, remodel together

Posted by on November 15th, 2018

Newborn babies are a symbol of immense potential, as they can grow up to be become virtually anybody, from an astronaut to the president. It is no secret that throughout life, there are critical junctions in which specific events or decisions can direct us on one path or another. Such events occur in our brains;[…]

Sex combs in motion

Posted by on November 14th, 2018

Using computer simulations and mathematical modeling to study the evolution of morphogenesis   Juan N. Malagon and Ernest Ho tell the story behind their recent paper in PLOS Computational Biology. In the Larsen lab, we are interested in testing a 50-year old question: How do sex combs rotate in fruit flies? Despite extensive studies of the[…]

1 PhD Position : Characterization of Hedgehog morphogens in vitro and in vivo

Posted by on October 18th, 2018

1 PhD Position : Characterization of Hedgehog morphogens in vitro and in vivo Hedgehog (Hh) morphogens play important roles in development and cancer, but their mode of extracellular transport to target cells is only poorly understood. Thus, we aim at the characterization of various unusual posttranslational regulatory mechanisms in Hh biology, such as Hh multimerization[…]

A study using Drosophila sheds light on the metastatic behaviour of human tumours

Posted by on September 26th, 2018

Most solid tumours with metastatic potential show a high degree of chromosomal instability. A study published in the journal Developmental Cell demonstrates that chromosomal instability itself promotes invasive behaviour. The researchers identify the oncogene Fos and the tumour suppressor Capicua as necessary molecular elements mediating this invasive behaviour. Barcelona, 26 September 2018.- Metastatic tumours are[…]

Postdoc position on ageing in the Drosophila nervous system

Posted by on September 6th, 2018

BBSRC funded postdoc position in the laboratory of Natalia Sánchez-Soriano (https://sanchezlab.wordpress.com), to study the cell biology of neuronal ageing and the underlying mechanisms.     On this project you will study the harmful changes that neurons undergo at the subcellular level during ageing, and unravel the cascade of events that cause them. The focus will[…]

The people behind the papers – Jaqueline Kinold & Hermann Aberle

Posted by on September 4th, 2018

Axon guidance relies on the reception and integration of molecular cues from the environment by growth cones, and defective pathfinding results in misplaced projection patterns in the mature nervous system. A new paper in Development investigates this process in the Drosophila neuromucular system, as well as the consequences of axonal miswiring to locomotion. We caught up[…]

Dating with cells – finding the right match

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

It’s an age-old mystery of the heart: do opposites attract, or will like do better with like? We can now answer this pressing question, at least for Drosophila cardioblasts: cells prefer to ‘swipe right’ on a shared transcriptional profile, but the resulting relationships are stronger if there are some unattractive alternatives around to remind them[…]

Fat to the forefront of histone regulation

Posted by on August 21st, 2018

All life requires energy. For early metazoan development, demand is especially high, as the transition from a single cell to a complex, multicellular organism requires a massive energetic input. In the earliest stages of development, however, an organisms’ inability to feed poses an apparent problem: how is the energy necessary to drive development obtained? In[…]