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Making time matter: how hormone pulses direct chromatin accessibility during development

Posted by on August 8th, 2017

Each of our cells has the same genetic information and thus the same potential to become a part of a heart, brain, or a finger. Somehow though, during development our cells manage to figure out exactly which type of cell they should be and which body parts they should help compose. The key to making[…]

Research assistant in Development Biology, Sheffield University

Posted by on August 3rd, 2017

A Wellcome Trust/Royal Society funded Research Assistant position is available in Dr Kyra Campbell’s research group. This is a fantastic opportunity to join the Campbell group, who are focused on identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial cell plasticity during development and disease. We study how this fundamental property is orchestrated during morphogenesis of the Drosophila[…]

The people behind the papers – Giri Dahal, Sarala Pradhan & Emily Bates

Posted by on August 2nd, 2017

Ion channels are famous for their roles in neurons and muscles, but the spectrum of phenotypes seen in ion channel mutants indicate a diversity of roles in development; the underlying mechanisms, however, have remained opaque. This week we feature a paper published in the latest issue of Development that reveals a link between potassium channels and morphogen[…]

The Drosophila fly brings to light the role of morphogens in limb growth

Posted by on July 5th, 2017

• Scientists at IRB Barcelona clarify the function of the genes that drive wing development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. • Published in the journal eLife, this study unveils that the Dpp morphogen is necessary for wing growth but that its gradient does not govern this process. • Understanding the development of limbs in[…]

Multiple stem cells, population asymmetry and position-dependent heterogeneity emerge as common features of a niche for Drosophila Follicle Stem Cells and mammalian Intestinal Stem Cells

Posted by on June 16th, 2017

A discussion of “Alternative direct stem cell derivatives defined by stem cell location and graded Wnt signalling,” Nat Cell Biol, 2017. 19(5): p. 433-444.   We have recently revised the model of Follicle Stem Cell (FSC) organization in the Drosophila ovary, showing that there is a much larger population of stem cells than formerly realized, that[…]

DrosAfrica: Background and Workshops

Posted by on May 24th, 2017

Introduction to the DrosAfrica project The contribution of scientific research in shaping societies is increasingly significant. However, African researchers make up only around two per cent of the world’s academic research community. One of the central problems for African science is poor quality and quantity of research-based education. We believe that basic scientific research could[…]

An interview with Eric Wieschaus

Posted by on May 18th, 2017

I had started to become a little worried when I didn’t see Eric on the opening day of the conference, but it turned out that his plane to Germany had been delayed by the snowstorms blanketing the Eastern seaboard of the US and he made it in the end. Between sessions later on, we found a slightly[…]

Our latest research on Hormonal regulation of temporal gene expression in neural stem cells

Posted by on May 16th, 2017

http://around.uoregon.edu/content/study-brain-formation-finds-possible-link-human-disease @ http://www.doelab.org/ elife https://elifesciences.org/content/6/e26287   (No Ratings Yet) Loading…

PhD position on tricellular junction dynamics in Drosophila at Münster, Germany

Posted by on March 25th, 2017

The Cluster of Excellence ”Cells in Motion“ (CiM) at the University of Münster invites applications for a   PhD student position (Salary Scale 13 TV-L / 65%) on   Dynamics of tricellular junctions in Drosophila   in the group of Prof. Stefan Luschnig at the Institute of Neurobiology. The position will start at the earliest[…]

Organelle Assembly in Vivo: The Love-Hate Relationship of Thermodynamic and Active Processes

Posted by on March 6th, 2017

Comment on ”Independent active and thermodynamic processes govern nucleolus assembly in vivo”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114 (6), 1335-1340, (2017). Hanieh Falahati, Lewis–Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, Princeton University. Eric Wieschaus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University.   The whole universe is moving toward disorder; this is the[…]