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Displaying posts with the tag: drosophila [Clear Filter]

Postdoc position on ageing in the Drosophila nervous system

Posted by on September 6th, 2018

BBSRC funded postdoc position in the laboratory of Natalia Sánchez-Soriano (https://sanchezlab.wordpress.com), to study the cell biology of neuronal ageing and the underlying mechanisms.     On this project you will study the harmful changes that neurons undergo at the subcellular level during ageing, and unravel the cascade of events that cause them. The focus will[…]

The people behind the papers – Jaqueline Kinold & Hermann Aberle

Posted by on September 4th, 2018

Axon guidance relies on the reception and integration of molecular cues from the environment by growth cones, and defective pathfinding results in misplaced projection patterns in the mature nervous system. A new paper in Development investigates this process in the Drosophila neuromucular system, as well as the consequences of axonal miswiring to locomotion. We caught up[…]

Dating with cells – finding the right match

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

It’s an age-old mystery of the heart: do opposites attract, or will like do better with like? We can now answer this pressing question, at least for Drosophila cardioblasts: cells prefer to ‘swipe right’ on a shared transcriptional profile, but the resulting relationships are stronger if there are some unattractive alternatives around to remind them[…]

Fat to the forefront of histone regulation

Posted by on August 21st, 2018

All life requires energy. For early metazoan development, demand is especially high, as the transition from a single cell to a complex, multicellular organism requires a massive energetic input. In the earliest stages of development, however, an organisms’ inability to feed poses an apparent problem: how is the energy necessary to drive development obtained? In[…]

The toilet paper model

Posted by on August 3rd, 2018

  In LM Escudero´s group, we like developmental biology, mathematical biology and computational biology. We try to be imaginative and get inspiration from simple things… such as a toilet paper roll. Using this tool (and some computers), we claim that we have described a novel geometrical shape… You will be wondering… how do you do[…]

Senior Research Position (Boston, MA)

Posted by on June 27th, 2018

The DRSC/TRiP Functional Genomics Resources in the Perrimon group at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, USA, is seeking a highly motivated senior-level research technician to join our team. The successful candidate will be responsible for performing molecular biology, cell culture, protein purification, and/or related techniques as part of an overall research program focused on[…]

BBSRC-funded postdoc position – neuronal ageing

Posted by on June 26th, 2018

BBSRC funded postdoc position in the laboratory of Natalia Sanchez-Soriano (https://sanchezlab.wordpress.com), to study the cell biology of neuronal ageing and the underlying mechanisms.  The aim of the project is to understand the harmful changes that neurons undergo at the subcellular level during ageing, and unravel the cascade of events that cause them, with a focus[…]

Lighting Up the Central Dogma in Development

Posted by on June 19th, 2018

We recently published a manuscript in Cell that describes a method to image transcription factor concentration dynamics in real time, in living embryos, using a nanobody-based protein tag that we call the “LlamaTag.” We were particularly excited about these investigations because this new technology overcomes a major technical obstacle to understanding how gene-expression dynamics are[…]

From basic questions to exciting findings

Posted by on May 21st, 2018

In this post we report the backstories behind our recently published paper. It was an enjoyable research adventure driven by discussions, readings, exciting experiments and unexpected discoveries. As a result, we described a novel molecular mechanism underpinning stem cell and progenitor maintenance during development. Here is the sequence of the main events that inspired us[…]

Redefining the Aging Process

Posted by on May 4th, 2018

This post highlights the approach and findings of a new research article published in Disease Models and Mechanisms (DMM). This feature was written by J. Brucker Nourse Jr. as part of a graduate level seminar at The University of Alabama (taught by DMM Editorial Board member, Prof. Guy Caldwell) on current topics related to use[…]