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Displaying posts with the tag: embryo [Clear Filter]

Reactions to the CRISPR human embryo paper

Posted by on August 3rd, 2017

A paper published online yesterday in Nature (and ‘leaked’ a week ago by the MIT Technology Review) describes the use of CRISPR in human embryos to correct a mutation that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The work has hit the headlines and sparked debate about its utility and implications. Collated below are responses from the field (or[…]

9.5 million knockout mouse embryo images now available

Posted by on July 20th, 2017

A new set of DMDD embryo and placenta data has been released, taking our total dataset to 9.5 million images of around 1300 embryos. DMDD is a primary screen of embryonic lethal knockout mice, and all data can be freely accessed at dmdd.org.uk. Detailed phenotypes are available for embryos from 73 different knockout lines, and[…]

Why are geneticists measuring the webbing between mouse embryo fingers?

Posted by on February 21st, 2017

A new paper published in Journal of Anatomy shows that measuring the amount of inter-digital webbing in mouse embryos between 14 and 15 days gestation is the best way to find out their exact stage of development. So why is this important to a geneticist? If we want to discover a causal link between a gene[…]

Transposons in Embryo Space – TRACER maps in EMAGE

Posted by on February 9th, 2017

A recent publication in Developmental Biology by (Armit et al., 2017) describes how the TRACER dataset can be spatially compared with in situ hybridisation gene expression profiles.   The TRACER dataset of transposon-associated regulatory sensors (Chen et al., 2013) utilises Sleeping Beauty lacZ transposons that have been randomly integrated into the mouse genome Hundreds of[…]

New phenotype dataset available for embryonic-lethal mouse knockouts

Posted by on December 1st, 2016

    This post originally appeared on Annotations, the DMDD blog.   New image and phenotype data for embryos and placentas from embryonic lethal knockout mouse lines has been made available on the DMDD website today. The knockout data includes the ciliary gene Rpgrip1l as well as Atg16l1, a gene encoding a protein that forms[…]

New phenotype screen examines causes of neonatal death

Posted by on October 4th, 2016

This post first appeared on Annotations, the DMDD blog (blog.dmdd.org.uk). Around a third of targeted gene knockouts in mice are embryonic-lethal. But not all deaths occur during gestation – a significant number of gene knockouts result in death at or shortly after the time of birth. Mice from these knockout lines provide a valuable animal[…]

New data reveals gene expression during mouse embryo development

Posted by on September 29th, 2016

This article was originally posted on the DMDD website dmdd.org.uk Knowing the ‘normal’ expression of genes during embryo development is key to understanding the differences that occur due to genetic mutations. As part of work to understand the underlying transcriptional processes for developing embryos from knockout mouse lines, DMDD has now released a gene expression[…]

Postdoctoral position in chromatin regulation and epigenetic control of Drosophila development

Posted by on February 19th, 2015

Stockholm University, Sweden, invites applications for one postdoctoral position in the laboratory of Professor Mattias Mannervik at the Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute (http://www.su.se/mbw/research/research-groups/integrative-biology/group-mannervik). The position is scheduled to start as soon as possible. Transcriptional coregulators are proteins that facilitate communication between transcription factors and the basal transcription apparatus, in part by affecting[…]

Gastrulation: Local actions, global movements and self-organisation

Posted by on June 6th, 2014

Cells move in (still) mysterious ways to achieve morphogenesis. Prominently, cells of an early vertebrate embryo (blastula, a mass of undifferentiated cells) move extensively during gastrulation to generate the three basic layers of the organism: ectoderm at the surface, endoderm presaging the digestive tube, and the mesoderm in between. At the end of the process,[…]

A fruitful visit from INB to INA

Posted by on December 15th, 2013

My name is Daniel Ríos and I am a grad student at the ‘Instituto de Neurobiología (INB)’ from the National Autonomous University of Mexico. However, during this past October I was part of the ‘Instituto de Neurociencias de Alicante (INA)’, from the Miguel Hernandez University, in Spain. Ok, I was there just for a short time working[…]