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Displaying posts with the tag: left-right-asymmetry [Clear Filter]

The people behind the papers #15

Posted by on February 21st, 2017

Conjoined twins have fascinated biologists for centuries. In twins joined at the thorax, left-right patterning is disrupted, but only in one half of the right hand twins. Today’s paper, from this week’s issue of Current Biology, tackles this enigmatic phenomenon using Xenopus, and reveals that laterality in conjoined twins is determined by cilia-driven leftward flow.[…]

Left-right asymmetry, embryonic development, and more

Posted by on August 26th, 2014

Hello there, first time posting on The Node! Every so often Wiley compiles a small selection of recent research on a particular topic, and the most recent is on the topic of developmental biology. This includes some┬áspecial issues from journals with reviews on: Left-Right asymmetry Embryonic development Cell proliferation and development The first two special[…]

Making and breaking the left-right axis in Cancun

Posted by on June 28th, 2013

Just before the ISDB meeting in Mexico, over a hundred researchers gathered for a satellite symposium on the development of left-right asymmetry. Although the external body plans of vertebrates (and many invertebrates) are bilaterally symmetrical, various internal organs are positioned asymmetrically. For example, the heart is located towards the left, but paired organs such as[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 6)

Posted by on February 22nd, 2011

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development: Arteriovenous-specific regulation of angiogenesis Endothelial cells (ECs) assume arterial- or venous-specific molecular characteristics at early stages of development. These lineage-specific molecular programmes subsequently instruct the development of the distinct vascular architectures of arteries and veins. Now, on p. 1173, Jau-Nian Chen and co-workers investigate[…]