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Displaying posts with the tag: plants [Clear Filter]

Surprise findings turn up the temperature on the study of vernalization

Posted by on February 15th, 2019

Press Release from the John Innes Centre (link) New evidence has emerged about the agriculturally important process of vernalization in a development that could help farmers deal with financially damaging weather fluctuations.     Vernalization is the process by which plants require prolonged exposure to cold temperature before they transition from the vegetative state to[…]

It’s the Father! Paternally expressed BABY BOOM1 initiates embryogenesis in rice

Posted by on January 29th, 2019

The story behind our recent Nature paper ‘A male-expressed rice embryogenic trigger redirected for asexual propagation through seeds‘ For sexually reproducing organisms, the diploid life cycle starts with the fusion of a sperm cell with an egg cell. This process, known as fertilization, results in the formation of a zygote, the first diploid cell from[…]

Testing Zimmermann’s Telome Theory

Posted by on August 1st, 2018

A perspective on our recent paper ‘CLAVATA was a genetic novelty for the morphological innovation of 3D growth in land plants’1.   In the 1950’s, the German botanist Walter Zimmermann (photo here) hypothesized a series of developmental transitions enabling plant forms to radiate during evolution2. Zimmermann’s so-called Telome Theory has received much attention from those[…]

Crossing fields- EMBO conference on interdisciplinary plant development

Posted by on October 8th, 2014

There is something exciting about biologists joining forces with physicists and/or mathematicians, and finding a common language to solve biological problems that are just too complex to understand without stepping outside the realm of ‘traditional’ biology. At the recent EMBO conference on plant development, interdisciplinary studies were the main focus. And as the organiser of[…]

Scientists unveil a molecular mechanism that controls plant growth and development

Posted by on February 7th, 2014

–  Researchers at IRB and IBMB-CSIC, in Barcelona, and at the University of Wageningen, in the Netherlands, reveal how auxin hormone-regulated proteins activate developmental genes in plants. – Auxins are key components of plant growth and have many applications in agriculture. The biomedical application of these hormones are also being addressed. – The study is[…]

13th FASEB Plant Biology Conference- Mechanisms in Plant Development

Posted by on October 9th, 2013

The 13th FASEB Plant Biology Conference was held from August 11- 16, 2013, in Saxtons River, Vermont, a modest but beautiful setting.  This was a special meeting, since it marked 25 years since the first FASEB Plant Molecular Biology conference- the theme changed to Plant Development in the mid ‘90’s. Around 160 attendees spent 5[…]

Interview with Jiří Friml

Posted by on October 19th, 2012

At the EMBO meeting last month, Jiří Friml was awarded the EMBO Gold Medal. This medal is awarded annually to a researcher under the age of forty, who has contributed to the field of molecular biology. Friml got the award for his work on auxin transport and morphogen gradient formation in plants. In his Gold[…]

An Interview With Ottoline Leyser

Posted by on October 25th, 2011

(This interview originally appeared in Development.) The Sainsbury Laboratory at the University of Cambridge is a new research institute that aims to achieve an integrated understanding of plant development. Its Associate Director is the new plant Editor of Development, Ottoline Leyser, who is also Professor of Plant Development at the University of Cambridge. We recently caught[…]

RNAi in the Nucleus ~ It’s no longer limited to the cytoplasm

Posted by on January 18th, 2011

Hot off the press from the holidays is an article from PNAS that’s worth a gander if you’re into RNAi. We know RNAi associated with epigenetics is possible in the nucleus (Somehow, siRNAs could trigger the methylation and silencing of genes in the nucleus.) However, one soy bean group was able to provide evidence for[…]

Arrested Development in Plant miRNA Mutants

Posted by on January 11th, 2011

Animals and Plants have hundreds of miRNAs with diverse roles in gene regulation. In humans, each miRNA family can control up to several hundred genes (or 500 to be exact, in humans). A loss of function in one, can lead to array of developmental defects. Similarly in plants, an miRNA mutant can have a variety of phenotypes. However, interestingly, many miRNAs only have one target, which is frequently a transcription factor that in turn, controls many genes itself. It’s really like a house of cards.