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Research Assistant in Developmental and Regenerative Medicine – University of Oxford

Posted by on November 6th, 2017

Research Assistant in Developmental and Regenerative Medicine Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics & Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford Grade 6: £28,098 p.a. Applications are invited for an experienced and meticulous Research Assistant to join the Cardiovascular Development, Repair and Regeneration team working under the direct supervision of Professor Paul Riley and Dr[…]

An interview with Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard

Posted by on November 3rd, 2017

This interview by Katherine Brown originally appeared in Development, Vol 144 Issue 21 Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard is Director Emeritus at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, Germany. In 1995, she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine, along with Eric Wieschaus and Edward Lewis, for her work on the genetic control[…]

The right information

Posted by on October 19th, 2017

Oscar H. Ocaña and M. Angela Nieto Comment on “A right-handed signalling pathway drives heart looping in vertebrates”. Nature 549, 86-90 (2017).   A fundamental aspect of vertebrates is their external bilateral symmetry, which has to some extent shaped evolutionary success. Not only is beauty associated with symmetry, enhancing an individual’s chance of mating but[…]

Ph.D. positions in Developmental Biology, Morphogenesis, Cardiovascular Biology-University of Mississippi

Posted by on October 13th, 2017

  Our research seeks to investigate the fundamental question of how cardiac cells sense and respond to their environment. Focusing on tissue interactions we seek to understand the mechanisms underlying the regulation of morphogenic and identity transformations that occur during development and disease. We use the assembly of the heart tube in zebrafish as our[…]

Two fully-funded PhD positions in Wnt trafficking at the LSI in Exeter

Posted by on October 9th, 2017

The process of subdividing a tissue into functional units represents a classic problem in pattern formation. Signalling proteins – so-called morphogens – orchestrate this process. The traditional view is that morphogens are released from local source and slowly diffuse through a neighbouring tissue to build up a gradient. As Wnt signals act as a key[…]

Discovery Through Collaboration: Brain Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

Posted by on August 8th, 2017

Looking back on the journey: Intracellular uptake of macromolecules by brain lymphatic endothelial cells during zebrafish embryonic development eLife van Lessen et al., 2017   Just over two years ago, while I was a Masters of Neuroscience student at University College London, I became interested in the emerging concepts of brain lymphatics and sleep dependent macromolecule[…]

The people behind the papers: Gabriel Krens and Carl-Philipp Heisenberg

Posted by on May 25th, 2017

Cell sorting is a critical process during development, as differently specified cells are segregated to the right parts of the embryo. Differences in cell adhesion and cortical tension are thought to be crucial to this process, but the mechanics have been difficult to probe in vivo. This week’s paper, published in the current issue of[…]

Biotagging: Behind the scenes (and beyond)

Posted by on May 16th, 2017

“It finally got accepted!”, fol­­lowed by “It’s finally out!” about a month later. I am certain this ‘finally’ feeling about their paper is very familiar to those well-acquainted with the peer review process, and it was no different for our recently published Resource article. The ‘biotagging paper’, as we call it within the Sauka-Spengler lab,[…]

The people behind the papers: Dae Seok Eom & David Parichy

Posted by on April 7th, 2017

Macrophages are usually associated with immunity, but have increasingly appreciated functions in development and homeostasis. This week we meet the authors of a recent Science paper that identified a role for macrophages in zebrafish stripe patterning, revealing a remarkable ‘relay’ mechanism whereby macrophages help one type of cell signal to another via cytoplasmic extensions. Postdoc[…]

Biologists find ‘skin-and-bones’ mechanism underlying zebrafish fin regeneration

Posted by on March 28th, 2017

This Press Release from the University of Oregon was originally posted on Eurekalert.   EUGENE, Ore. March 28, 2017 University of Oregon biologists have figured out how zebrafish perfectly regenerate amputated fins with a precisely organized skeleton. Adult zebrafish fins, including their complex skeleton, regenerate exactly to their original form within two weeks after an[…]