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Displaying posts with the tag: zebrafish [Clear Filter]

The people behind the papers – Kana Ishimatsu, Tom Hiscock & Sean Megason

Posted by on June 12th, 2018

Somites are segmented structures  which give rise to numerous tissues in the vertebrate body. It has long been observed that somites scale in size with the overall size of the embryo, both as development proceeds and between individuals of different sizes, but the molecular underpinnings of this process have remained controversial. A new paper in[…]

Postdoctoral Positions — Neural crest stem cells, pigment pattern, adult form

Posted by on June 1st, 2018

Postdoctoral positions are available in the Parichy lab at University of Virginia. The lab studies development using zebrafish and related species. Current emphases include hormonal control over post-embryonic neural crest stem cells, plasticity in cell state, evolution of novel cell types, and mechanisms of pattern formation and cell–cell communication within zebrafish and across Danio species.[…]

Pancreatic Beta-Cell Regeneration in Zebrafish – Postdoctoral Position in Dresden

Posted by on May 16th, 2018

Postdoctoral position in the research group of Dr. Nikolay Ninov at the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden and the Paul Langerhans Institute Dresden (PLID) (of Helmholtz Zentrum München and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD e.V.). Our goal is to understand beta-cell regeneration and function in vivo in order to develop innovative cures for[…]

Borders and communities: solving old puzzles with new tools

Posted by on May 10th, 2018

An important question in developmental biology is how regions with distinct identity are established despite the intermingling of cells that occurs during growth and morphogenesis. Our recent work revisited some old studies of how the vertebrate hindbrain is patterned, and found that sharp and homogeneous segments are formed through a combination of identity switching and[…]

The dorsal root of the matter: Using zebrafish to study the importance of movement on early brain growth

Posted by on May 8th, 2018

In our recent paper published in eLife, we found a novel form of movement-dependent neural feedback that drives early forebrain growth in zebrafish. In this article, I discuss the problems, solutions, and lucky breaks that led to our finding. I also end up giving the mighty zebrafish larvae the credit it so deserves.   A[…]

How does it Work? My Experience with 3 Different Model Systems

Posted by on February 5th, 2018

For both young and established developmental biologists considering their next career move, choosing a model system with which to answer one’s research questions is a big decision. Of course, the most important thing to consider is whether or not a particular system is compatible with your research goals. But for a young scientist looking to[…]

Gaining traction: What Hippos can teach us about vertebrate embryonic morphogenesis

Posted by on January 19th, 2018

In our recently published paper, we discovered that the Hippo pathway transcription factors have an unexpected role in creating the conditions for the zebrafish body to extend posteriorly during embryogenesis, as well to form the precursors of the dorsal and ventral fins. Here is the backstory of the twists and turns that lead to these[…]

Research Assistant in Developmental and Regenerative Medicine – University of Oxford

Posted by on November 6th, 2017

Research Assistant in Developmental and Regenerative Medicine Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics & Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford Grade 6: £28,098 p.a. Applications are invited for an experienced and meticulous Research Assistant to join the Cardiovascular Development, Repair and Regeneration team working under the direct supervision of Professor Paul Riley and Dr[…]

An interview with Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard

Posted by on November 3rd, 2017

This interview by Katherine Brown originally appeared in Development, Vol 144 Issue 21 Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard is Director Emeritus at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen, Germany. In 1995, she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine, along with Eric Wieschaus and Edward Lewis, for her work on the genetic control[…]

The right information

Posted by on October 19th, 2017

Oscar H. Ocaña and M. Angela Nieto Comment on “A right-handed signalling pathway drives heart looping in vertebrates”. Nature 549, 86-90 (2017).   A fundamental aspect of vertebrates is their external bilateral symmetry, which has to some extent shaped evolutionary success. Not only is beauty associated with symmetry, enhancing an individual’s chance of mating but[…]