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Displaying posts with the tag: zebrafish [Clear Filter]

The people behind the papers – Chaitanya Dingare and Virginie Lecaudey

Posted by on December 5th, 2018

This interview, the 52nd in our series, was the first to be published in Development. We’re aiming for one interview per issue, and will continue to put them up here (once the issue has closed).    During teleost fertilisation, sperm fertilises the oocyte through the micropyle, a channel traversing the vitelline membrane at the animal[…]

Utah Fish Conference 2018: Meeting Summary

Posted by on October 25th, 2018

The Zebrafish Interest Group at the University of Utah held its first Utah Fish Conference (UFC) on October 8, 2018. The conference was organized by pre- and post-doctoral trainees to celebrate the University’s Zebrafish Interest Group (ZIG), as well as to unite the Mountain West fish community. This 1-day event hosted over 80 attendees from[…]

Scaling the Fish: An L.A. Story

Posted by on October 18th, 2018

Jeff Rasmussen tells the story behind his recent paper from the Sagasti Lab in Dev Cell. This project began as an extension of my earlier postdoc work in Alvaro Sagasti’s lab investigating removal of axon debris following skin injuries in the larval zebrafish [1] and led me into scientific territory that I never anticipated. It[…]

Singapore Fish Meeting 2018

Posted by on October 11th, 2018

On 2nd October 2018, the Mechanobiology Institute in Singapore hosted a meeting of Singapore-based researchers using fish in their work. We wanted to bring together the local community to build support and promote future research collaborations within Singapore. This meeting follows successful international conferences last year in Singapore, where the importance of fish in both[…]

Staying in shape

Posted by on October 5th, 2018

If you’re into developmental biology, chances are you’ve spent some time in your life thinking about how cells change the shapes of tissues. What would cells need to do in order to prevent change of tissue shape, though? In the text below, I summarize my thoughts on why the question of not changing shape during[…]

Autonomous traffic – Wnt cytonemes lead the way.

Posted by on October 2nd, 2018

by Lauren Porter and Steffen Scholpp Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter, UK   The importance of Wnt signalling in developmental processes, wound healing and stem cell control has long been established. Historically, scientists attributed the transport of Wnt proteins from the source to the receiver cell to simple diffusion, however, this explanation did not[…]

Postdoctoral Fellow Position in Vascular Computational Analysis

Posted by on October 1st, 2018

A postdoctoral fellow is sought to participate in a study to better understand the role of genetic changes on the development and dysfunction of cerebral vasculature. The successful candidate will work with Drs. Sarah Childs and Kristina Rinker, their teams and collaborators to advance our understanding of vascular dysfunction enabling future diagnostics and therapeutic strategies.[…]

Research Associate – Cardiac morphogenesis and development

Posted by on September 30th, 2018

The Bloomekatz laboratory in the Department of Biology at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, MS is seeking a research associate to assist in our investigations of the fundamental mechanisms underlying cardiac morphogenesis and disease using zebrafish. Please see our website thebloomekatzlaboratory.org for further details on our research. The successful candidate will have an opportunity[…]

Pitx2c sets the stage for gastrulation

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

In our recently published paper https://elifesciences.org/articles/34880, we report that the transcription factor Pitx2c has an unexpected role during gastrulation, where it acts cell non-autonomously to promote mesendodermal cell migration required for axis extension in zebrafish.     “It is not birth, marriage or death which is the most important time in your life, but gastrulation. –[…]

How do pigment cells wander around?

Posted by on June 29th, 2018

The story behind melanocyte BACE2, posted by Yan Zhang and Richard White. You can read our recently published full article at Developmental Cell using this link.   Our story began six years ago when my mentor, Dr. Richard White, opened the zebrafish facility and showed me those swimming creatures. He pointed to one type with pigmented[…]