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9 thoughts on “There and back again…”

  1. Thanks for posting this Kara! It’s really good to hear experiences showing that leaving academia isn’t necessarily a one-way street. Like you, I was very worried when I quit the lab that there wouldn’t be a way back if I realised I wanted to return to academia. In my case, leaving the bench for the publishing world was very much the right decision, but I hope your story helps to combat that prevalent opinion that once you’re out, you’re out…




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  2. Brave article. Impressive to read a critical examination of a life event that most fellow travelers probably would find too gut wrenching revisit. Your students are lucky to have you teach them.




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  3. Excellent article! I’m an undergrad set on graduate school, but unsure of what level I want to teach (high school or college) and as a result, what degree to pursue (Master’s or PhD). It’s reassuring to know that choosing one particular path does not eliminate the other as a future option.




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  4. Very interesting post Kara ! Still I have one question as an aspiring editor: why scientific editing is not a “unique and creative contribution to science” ? A naive belief would be that editors shape the articles and the fields, notably in “powerful” journals like Cell.

    I would love to read a follow-up describing the typical week of an editor and your thoughts about it. Thanks again for sharing !




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    1. Thanks for the comment, Ezra. My words about making a unique and creative contribution to science was not meant to take away from the creative and very important contributions that scientific editors make but was rather meant to emphasize the more creative aspects of bench science — designing experiments, troubleshooting, capturing images, putting together a manuscript from data that I and my collaborators have generated. As an editor, you are at least one step removed from the science and not nearly as intimately involved in the day-to-day of experiments. I thought I would like that particular aspect of editing, and it was fun to be able to think about lots of different things and not worry too much about an experiment working or not. At the end day, though, I learned that I missed working with my hands (being physically creative) more than I imagined I would. Hope this and the other posts that Cat mentions (see below) help.

      You might also might try connecting with an editor at a scientific meeting (go by the journal’s booth in the exhibitor’s hall). They might be able to give you more of the insight that you’re looking for.




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