the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: is_archive [Clear Filter]

Development presents… December webinar on plant development

Posted by on November 30th, 2020

Reminder: this webinar is happening  Wednesday 2 December 2020, 10:00 GMT (that’s 11:00 Vienna/15:30 Delhi/19:00 Tokyo/21:00 Sydney)     We’re happy to confirm the next in our Development presents… webinar series will be chaired by our Editor Yrjö Helariutta (Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge / Institute of Biotecnology, University of Helsinki) and features three talks[…]

Now we need arrest… A long journey into the end-of-flowering

Posted by on June 29th, 2020

By Tom Bennett & Catriona Walker   25th May 2020: Publication TB: The joy of seeing an article finally published is always slightly tempered by the long-drawn out process of peer review, re-writing, re-submission, re-review, proof-reading, required to get to that point. But the publication of our article ‘Auxin export from proximal fruit drives arrest[…]

BSDB Gurdon/The Company of Biologists 2019 Summer Studentship Report – Luca Argirò

Posted by on January 17th, 2020

Established by the British Society for Developmental Biology in 2014, The Gurdon/The Company of Biologists Summer Studentship scheme provides financial support to allow highly motivated undergraduate students an opportunity to engage in practical research during their summer vacation. Each year, ten successful applicants spend eight weeks in the research laboratories of their choices, and the feedback[…]

The people behind the papers – Qiang Zhu, Marçal Gallemí and Eva Benková

Posted by on October 10th, 2019

This interview, the 69th in our series, was recently published in Development.  The apical hook is a transient structure that functions to protect the vulnerable apical meristem from damage when the seedling penetrates the soil. Although some of the molecular players regulating its development have been identified, many aspects have remained opaque, including how an early auxin[…]

Genetics Unzipped podcast – Supermodels of science

Posted by on February 28th, 2019

 In this episode from our series exploring 100 ideas in genetics, we’re entering the glamorous world of modelling, meeting the supermodels… of science. We’re taking a look at some of the field’s top models – the eclectic collection of organisms that have been put to work in the lab to reveal the secrets of biology.[…]

Plant stem cells strive towards equality

Posted by on February 8th, 2019

By George Bassel and Iain Johnston Multicellular organs consist of collections of cells which come together to achieve what individual cells cannot. The establishment of order in complex tissues has long been a subject of interest, dating back to the origins of microscopy itself. Previous studies have proposed rules which predict when a cell will[…]

The people behind the papers – Dongbo Shi and Thomas Greb

Posted by on January 19th, 2019

This interview, the 56th in our series, was recently published in Development Radial growth in plants is driven by proliferating cells in the cambium that give rise to the vascular tissues of xylem and phloem, and increases plant girth. However, the identity and dynamics of the stem cells that drive this crucial process remain poorly understood. A[…]

The people behind the papers – Vinh Ngoc Pham and Enamul Huq

Posted by on January 16th, 2019

This interview, the 53rd in our series, was published in Development last year The ability to sense and respond to light is fundamental to plant development. As seedlings move from the soil to the air, a switch in developmental program occurs to promote light capture and autotrophic growth. A paper in Development now provides a molecular analysis of the[…]

The people behind the papers – Takanori Wakatake & Ken Shirasu

Posted by on July 23rd, 2018

Parasitic plants are fascinating and agriculturally relevant organisms that rely for their success on the haustorium, a specialised root structure that invades host root vasculature to derive nutrients and water. A recent paper in Development addresses the developmental origins of these crucial structures in the facultative root parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum. We caught up with first author Takanori Wakatake and[…]

The people behind the papers – Ximena Anleu Gil & Dominique Bergmann

Posted by on July 18th, 2018

Asymmetric division is a widespread mechanism for generating cellular diversity during developmental patterning. The stomata of flowering plants are epidermal valves that regulate gas exchange, and provide an accessible system to investigate the mechanisms of asymmetric cell division both within and across species. A paper in the new issue of Development reports an investigation of the molecular control of this[…]