the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: is_archive [Clear Filter]

Senior research scientist at the Francis Crick Institute (permanent position)

Posted by on December 14th, 2020

The Evolutionary Developmental Biology Lab at the Francis Crick Institute is seeking a laboratory research scientist that will help establish the laboratory, manage its day-to-day operations, and lead the generation of large-scale genomics datasets. The Evolutionary Developmental Biology Lab will open early 2021. We study how organs originate and how they diversify in form and[…]

Lab Manager/Research Assistant–Marine Invertebrate EvoDevo

Posted by on November 27th, 2020

We seek a motivated and organized individual to join the Lyons Lab (https://www.lyonslab.org/) at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (https://scripps.ucsd.edu/) to serve as lab manger and research assistant.  The individual will assist the lab in funded projects on molluscan neurodevelopment, developmental gene regulatory networks, and biomineralization.  The successful candidate will be responsible for lab organization,[…]

Looking to crustaceans to understand insect wing evolution

Posted by on October 19th, 2020

The wings of vertebrates, like birds and bats, emerged relatively recently, and we understand that these wings evolved from forelimbs. Even for the mythological dragon there seems to be a consensus (at least in recent depictions) that their wings are also derived from their forelimbs. Insects, however, possess both wings AND limbs on their winged[…]

Mayflies: an emergent model to investigate the evolution of winged insects

Posted by on September 11th, 2020

Winged insects are the most diverse and numerous group of animals on Earth. This great diversity has been possible thanks to the acquisition of novel morphologies and lifestyles. How the changes in their genomes contributed to the appearance and evolution of these traits is key to understand how this lineage adapted and conquered the huge[…]

The people behind the papers – Xin Zhu, Yiquan Wang and Guang Li

Posted by on August 26th, 2020

This interview, the 77th in our series, was published in Development earlier this year.  During development, the establishment of directional left-right (L-R) asymmetry is crucial for the correct positioning of organs within the body. How symmetry is broken in the embryo is still incompletely understood at the molecular level, as is its evolutionary history. A new[…]

Monotreme ears and the evolution of mammal jaws

Posted by on August 5th, 2020

Jaw joints, in most vertebrate animals that have them, form between a bone in the head called the quadrate and one in the mandible called the articular. The mandibles (lower jaw bone) of most vertebrates is compound, made up of fused bones, but we mammals are different.  We have lots of different types of teeth[…]

Introducing ACME: the species-versatile fixation and dissociation solution for single cell analysis

Posted by on July 1st, 2020

This post highlights the approach and findings of a new research article available in preprint on BioRxiv. This feature was written by members of the Solana lab, authors of that paper. Single cell techniques are revolutionising biology, but at the moment they are largely limited to traditional model organisms and require access to specialised equipment[…]

Postdoc position available at MPI BPC: Comparative genomics in planarians

Posted by on June 30th, 2020

The department of Tissue Dynamics and Regeneration (Dr. Jochen Rink) invites applications for a position as Postdoc (f/m/d) – Comparative genomics in planarians – (Code number 11-20) Planarians are fascinating animals that can regenerate from tiny pieces, harbor adult pluripotent stem cells, scale their bodies over a wide size range and, as a taxonomic group, display[…]

Conversations with my parents (about adult chondrogenesis and spontaneous cartilage repair in the skate, Leucoraja erinacea)

Posted by on June 23rd, 2020

One night, during the summer of 2012, I found myself sitting in a cottage in Woods Hole, trying to explain to my parents why I’d spent much of my professional life studying the little skate (Figure 1). I was a postdoctoral fellow at Dalhousie University at the time, and working almost exclusively with skate as[…]

Genetics Unzipped – Fish, facts and fiction – from Haeckel’s embryos to Tiktaalik

Posted by on January 30th, 2020

We’re discovering our inner fish: finding out whether we really do go through a fishy phase in the womb, and looking at the legacy of Tiktaalik, the first fish to walk on land.