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Introducing ACME: the species-versatile fixation and dissociation solution for single cell analysis

Posted by on July 1st, 2020

This post highlights the approach and findings of a new research article available in preprint on BioRxiv. This feature was written by members of the Solana lab, authors of that paper. Single cell techniques are revolutionising biology, but at the moment they are largely limited to traditional model organisms and require access to specialised equipment[…]

Postdoc position available at MPI BPC: Comparative genomics in planarians

Posted by on June 30th, 2020

The department of Tissue Dynamics and Regeneration (Dr. Jochen Rink) invites applications for a position as Postdoc (f/m/d) – Comparative genomics in planarians – (Code number 11-20) Planarians are fascinating animals that can regenerate from tiny pieces, harbor adult pluripotent stem cells, scale their bodies over a wide size range and, as a taxonomic group, display[…]

Conversations with my parents (about adult chondrogenesis and spontaneous cartilage repair in the skate, Leucoraja erinacea)

Posted by on June 23rd, 2020

One night, during the summer of 2012, I found myself sitting in a cottage in Woods Hole, trying to explain to my parents why I’d spent much of my professional life studying the little skate (Figure 1). I was a postdoctoral fellow at Dalhousie University at the time, and working almost exclusively with skate as[…]

Genetics Unzipped – Fish, facts and fiction – from Haeckel’s embryos to Tiktaalik

Posted by on January 30th, 2020

We’re discovering our inner fish: finding out whether we really do go through a fishy phase in the womb, and looking at the legacy of Tiktaalik, the first fish to walk on land. 

BSDB Gurdon/The Company of Biologists 2019 Summer Studentship Report – Réiltín Ní Theimhneáin

Posted by on January 21st, 2020

Established by the British Society for Developmental Biology in 2014, The Gurdon/The Company of Biologists Summer Studentship scheme provides financial support to allow highly motivated undergraduate students an opportunity to engage in practical research during their summer vacation. Each year, ten successful applicants spend eight weeks in the research laboratories of their choices, and the feedback[…]

BSDB Gurdon/The Company of Biologists 2019 Summer Studentship Report – Grace Blakeley

Posted by on January 15th, 2020

Established by the British Society for Developmental Biology in 2014, The Gurdon/The Company of Biologists Summer Studentship scheme provides financial support to allow highly motivated undergraduate students an opportunity to engage in practical research during their summer vacation. Each year, ten successful applicants spend eight weeks in the research laboratories of their choices, and the feedback[…]

What might evolutionary muscle loss and pathological atrophies have in common?

Posted by on January 8th, 2020

By Mai P. Tran and Kimberly L. Cooper “It’s the cutest rodent I have ever seen, even cuter than a cuddly hamster, and it would be fun doing a rotation for the opportunity to work with this animal.” That was my thought, as a first-year graduate student, when I first heard Kim present her research on[…]

Postdoctoral position in GRNs controlling cell identity and morphogenesis in molluscs

Posted by on January 2nd, 2020

The Lyons Lab at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (a department at U.C. San Diego) is recruiting a full-time Postdoctoral Scholar to support research projects funded by an NIH MIRA award.  The Lyons Lab (www.lyonslab.org) focuses on cell type differentiation and morphogenesis with a particular interest in how these processes evolve.  The postdoc will contribute to[…]

How do new cell types evolve? Sea urchins show the way….

Posted by on November 21st, 2019

We know surprisingly little about how evolution has created new cell types. One of the best examples of a recently evolved cell type comes from early sea urchin development. Most sea urchins produce a group of early embryonic cells known as micromeres- four small blastomeres that form by unequal cell division at the vegetal pole[…]

Using hemimetabolous insects to investigate the origin of the tra-dsx axis

Posted by on September 24th, 2019

The story behind our recent paper in eLife.   Rapid turn over of sex determination mechanisms provides biologists with an elegant study system connecting sexual selection to molecular evolution. Striking examples of this turnover are found in African cichlids, where multiple sex determination signals exist not only within the same genera, but sometimes within the[…]