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Displaying posts with the tag: evo-devo [Clear Filter]

Postdoc opening in marine cell biology and genomics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Posted by on September 17th, 2019

  The Hamdoun and Lyons Laboratories at U.C. San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography (https://scripps.ucsd.edu) are seeking a highly motivated postdoc candidate for a joint fellowship at the intersection of evolutionary and ecological developmental biology.  The successful candidate will be nominated for the competitive Scripps Postdoctoral Scholar (SPS) Award (https://apol-recruit.ucsd.edu/JPF02248).  The Hamdoun Lab (www.hamdounlab.org) focuses[…]

Discovering the Genetic Basis of Mimetic Color Diversity in Bumble Bees

Posted by on August 20th, 2019

As a first-year graduate student, I had the good fortune of accompanying Dr. Pierre Rasmont (U. Mons, Belgium) and his lab group on an expedition to collect bumble bees in Turkey. At our first stop onto the dry but flower-rich volcanic lands, we each dispersed to collect bees. At the time I was working to[…]

Research technician – functional approaches in annelid regeneration – Whitney Marine Lab (Florida)

Posted by on August 14th, 2019

Research technician position available for a project focused on functional technique development in annelid worms, with a conceptual focus on evo-devo and regeneration biology. This position is part of an NSF-funded project focused on developing approaches to test gene function in post-embryonic (juvenile and adult) stages of several annelid species. The project is a collaboration[…]

Research technician – functional approaches in annelid regeneration – Univ. of Maryland

Posted by on August 14th, 2019

Research technician position available for a project focused on functional technique development in annelid worms, with a conceptual focus on evo-devo and regeneration biology. This position is part of an NSF-funded project focused on developing approaches to test gene function in post-embryonic (juvenile and adult) stages of several annelid species. The project is a collaboration[…]

A day in the life of an onychophoran lab

Posted by on August 7th, 2019

What are onychophorans and why do we study them? My name is Sandra Treffkorn, and I recently finished my PhD in the department of zoology lead by Georg Mayer at the University of Kassel, Germany. In our research group, we focus on studying the evolution of animal diversity by investigating two very interesting but largely[…]

Ph.D. and Post Doc positions in plant development, morphogenesis and evolution

Posted by on July 24th, 2019

The Department of the Director Prof Miltos Tsiantis is looking for early stage researchers to employ at the Ph.D. and Post Doc level in the areas of plant development, morphogenesis and evolution (http://www.mpipz.mpg.de/226344/tsiantis-dpt). Ph. D. candidates should have an M. Sc in appropriate discipline (Plant biology, Developmental biology, Computer Science, Genetics, Biochemistry, Statistical, Evolutionary or[…]

The people behind the papers – Masanori Abe and Reiko Kuroda

Posted by on June 19th, 2019

This interview, the 64th in our series, was recently published in Development One of the most obvious examples of left-right asymmetry in animal bodies comes from snails: in most species or strains, the shells coil dextrally, but some coil sinistrally. The control of coiling is genetic and begins in the early embryo. Previous work has implicated the[…]

PhD position available in annelid Evo-Devo in the Meyer Lab

Posted by on June 5th, 2019

A PhD position is available in the laboratory of Néva P. Meyer at Clark University in Worcester, MA USA (https://wordpress.clarku.edu/nmeyer/) beginning as early as August 2019 as follows: Spiralians are a great group of animals to study evolution of body plans in part because many spiralian taxa develop via a stereotypic and likely ancestral cleavage[…]

A day in the life of a Termite lab

Posted by on May 31st, 2019

How do genes and their environment interact during development and evolution to generate phenotypic diversity? To answer these questions in the Miura lab, by focusing on diverse animal taxa, we are studying physiological and developmental mechanisms of phenotypic changes in animal life cycles in response to environmental shifts. By the way, I’m Kohei Oguchi, a[…]

PhD – Bacterial symbiosis in deep-sea annelids

Posted by on March 11th, 2019

Background Mutualistic relationships between bacteria and complex organisms have repeatedly evolved and this has allowed host organisms to exploit new environments and foods. One of the most extreme and fascinating cases of symbiosis in the animal kingdom is observed in annelid worms of the genus Riftia and Osedax. These animals are able to live in particularly[…]