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From mysterious cysts to CSF-in-a-dish

Posted by on September 21st, 2020

Our brain is immersed in a clear, colourless, nutrient-rich fluid called the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which provides mechanical support to the brain and helps to circulate important molecules for brain development and function. Within the interconnected cavities of our brain, the CSF flows in and out constantly. The CSF is actively produced by the choroid[…]

PhD in Systems Biology of Embryoid Self-Organization (Seville, Spain)

Posted by on July 17th, 2019

4 year PhD position, Seville Spain (deadline 25/07/19) We are looking for students with a Master degree to join our lab for a 4 year PhD position, application deadline 25/07/19. Our laboratory investigates fundamental questions of developmental biology by using mouse embryonic stem cells spheroids known as Embryoids. The successful candidate will develop a project[…]

The evolution from mouse to human models of lung development

Posted by on September 4th, 2017

The story behind our eLife paper: Nikolić, M. Z., Caritg, O., Jeng, Q., Johnson, J.-A., Sun, D., Howell, K. J., Brady, J. L., Laresgoiti, U., Allen, G., Butler, R., Zilbauer, M., Giangreco, A., Rawlins E.L. (2017). Human embryonic lung epithelial tips are multipotent progenitors that can be expanded in vitro as long-term self-renewing organoids. Elife[…]

NIH launches competition to develop human eye tissue in a dish

Posted by on June 21st, 2017

3-D Retina Organoid Challenge to spur breakthroughs in treating blinding diseases The National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, has opened the first stage of a federal prize competition designed to generate miniature, lab-grown human retinas. The retina is the light- sensitive tissue in the back of the eye. Over the[…]

Three dimensional human lung tissue in a dish

Posted by on May 6th, 2015

Pioneering efforts by others have made enormous strides in our ability to generate human lung tissue from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs); however, these efforts have largely focused on deriving lung-specific cells as flat monolayer cultures or growing these cells on scaffolds 1-7. In our paper, published recently in the open access journal eLife 8,[…]