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Vote for a Development cover – Woods Hole – round 2

Posted by , on 31 May 2012

The winner of the previous round of images from the 2011 Woods Hole embryology course appeared on the cover of Development a few weeks ago. But which of the following will receive the same honour? It’s up to you to decide: vote in the poll below the images for the one you would like to see on the cover of Development. (Click any of the images to see a bigger version.) Poll closes on June 19, noon GMT.

1. Widefield image of a pilidium larvae of the Nemertean ribbon worm, Cerebratulus lacteus, stained for F-actin (green; phalloidin), Acetylated tubulin (red) and DAPI (blue; nuclei). This image was taken by Joseph Campanale, Aracely Lutes, and Stephanie Majkut.

2. Confocal image of Crepidula fornicata (slipper limpet) embryo stained for FMRF (yellow), Acetylated tubulin (green) F-actin (purple; phalloidin) and DAPI (blue; nuclei). This image was taken by Juliette Petersen and Rachel K. Miller.

3. Confocal image of squid, Loligo pealei, embryo stained for for F-actin (green; phalloidin), Acetylated tubulin (red), anti-HRP (yellow), and DAPI (blue; nuclei). This image was taken by Juliana Roscito.

4. Confocal image of squid, Loligo pealei, embryo stained for for F-actin (red; phalloidin), Acetylated tubulin (green), and DAPI (blue; nuclei). This image was taken by Lynn Kee.


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Categories: Images

12 thoughts on “Vote for a Development cover – Woods Hole – round 2”

  1. Image 2 is almost like a piece of art work. They are all beautiful but 2 is so artists to look at very beautiful and well done. It would make a wonderful cover.

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  2. First choice would be 1. Then 2. Then 4. Then 3. Not a fan a constructed symmetry.

    I think 1 is well balanced and displays a wide range of colors while accentuating the underlying structures and evoking the feeling that the image is of a mysterious but living thing.

    All the images however, are amazing and convey the complexity and beauty of life. Plus they are super-awesome ™.

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