the community site for and by developmental biologists

About: IRBBarcelona

Biography:
IRB Barcelona is an independent, non-profit research institution engaged in basic and applied biomedical science that aims to improve quality of life by applying advances in this field. IRB Barcelona was founded in October 2005 by the Government of Catalonia (Generalitat de Catalunya), the University of Barcelona (UB) and the Barcelona Science Park (Parc Científic de Barcelona). The Institute aims to promote multidisciplinary research of excellence at the interface between biology, chemistry and medicine, to foster collaborations with local organisations and international research institutes, to provide high-level training in the biomedical sciences to staff, students and visitors, to promote innovation and technology transfer, and to actively engage in an open dialogue with the public through a series of outreach and education activities. IRB Barcelona is located in the Barcelona Science Park, a centre in which first-class public research converges with the private sector in a stimulating, vanguard scientific environment.
Website:
http://www.irbbarcelona.org/index.php/en

Posts by IRBBarcelona:

Scientists shed light on how cells with an incorrect number of chromosomes lead to tumour development

Posted by on February 9th, 2016

Aneuploid cells—that is to say those with an abnormal number of chromosomes—are found in most human tumours. A study conducted at IRB Barcelona on the fly Drosophila reveals how surviving aneuploid cells favour tumour development.   Barcelona, Thursday 9th February 2016.- A recent analysis of 43,205 human tumours unveiled that 68% of solid tumours are[…]

A technique dating back to 1935 is recovered for cancer research in flies

Posted by on September 15th, 2015

A study conducted by ICREA researcher Cayetano González, at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), and published in Nature Protocols describes a forgotten technique used in the fly Drosophila melanogaster dating back 80 years. This method allows the transplantation of tissue from larvae to adult flies, thus allowing research into tumour growth and[…]

Tumour suppressor genes curb growth in neighbouring cells

Posted by on August 28th, 2015

The healthy development of an organism depends on its tissues and organs growing to the right size, stopping when they need to, and maintaining stability in their form and function. Correct development depends on the availability of nutrients to the cells in their environment, a process that is tightly controlled by signalling mechanisms that occur[…]

Key protein in cilia assembly identified

Posted by on August 21st, 2015

The group led by ICREA Research Professor Cayetano Gonzalez at IRB Barcelona, in collaboration with the group of Professor Giuliano Callaini from the University of Siena in Italy, has published a new study in Current Biology that contributes to understanding how cilia are assembled. Many cells in our bodies present a small structure that looks[…]

The protein that keeps cells static is found to play a key role in cell movement

Posted by on August 14th, 2015

The protein E-Cadherin (E-Cad) is a kind of adhesive that keeps cells tightly bound together, thus favouring the organisation of tissues and organs. Scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) now reveal a new function for E-Cad, one that contrasts with its accepted role in impeding cell movement. The researchers have published[…]

Discovery of an unexpected function of a protein linked to neurodegenerative diseases

Posted by on April 28th, 2015

A study done on fruit flies and published in Nature Communications reveals that the protein dDsk2, in addition to degrading proteins, also plays a key role in regulating gene expression. This protein is also present in humans and is known to be mutated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s. But the mechanism by which these[…]

A mechanism that allows a differentiated cell to reactivate as a stem cell revealed

Posted by on October 29th, 2014

The study, performed with fruit flies, describes a gene that determines whether a specialized cell conserves the capacity to become a stem cell again. Unveiling the genetic traits that favour the retention of stem cell properties is crucial for regenerative medicine. Published in Cell Reports, the article is the fruit of collaboration between researchers at[…]

Barcelona BioMed Conference: Drosophila as a model in cancer (15 Jun 2015 to 17 Jun 2015)

Posted by on October 29th, 2014

Barcelona BioMed Conference: Drosophila as a model in cancer 15 – 17 Jun 2015 Cancer is a multi-hit process involving mutations in oncogenes and tumour suppressors, as well as interactions between the tumour cells and the surrounding normal tissue. The fruit fly, Drosophila, is an excellent, genetically-tractable system for modelling the development of cancer, due to the[…]

Flies with colon cancer help to unravel the genetic keys to disease in humans

Posted by on October 8th, 2014

Researchers generate for the first time Drosophila melanogaster with intestinal cancer and reveal key genetic factors behind human colon cancer. The scientists identify a human gene that favours the proliferation of tumour cells in early stages of colon cancer. Furthermore, the flies are useful for faster and more economic drug screening. Researchers at the Institute[…]

Researchers identify a key molecule in flies that adjusts energy use under starvation conditions

Posted by on July 24th, 2014

Marco Milán leads the Development and Growth Control Laboratory (Battista/Minocri, IRB Barcelona)  The Phd student Lara Barrio worked on the role of p53 in metabolism (Battista/Minocri, IRB Barcelona)   Scientists at IRB Barcelona have observed that, when deprived of food, flies that do not express p53 show poor management of energy store. The study, published[…]