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The people behind the papers – Rémi-Xavier Coux & Ruth Lehmann

Posted by on April 5th, 2018

Development and homeostasis depend crucially on the maintenance of cell identity, and in gamete-producing tissues the somatic/germline distinction is paramount. A recent paper in Development explores how cell identity is secured in the Drosophila ovary by studying the function of the conserved tumour suppressor L(3)mbt. To find out more about the story, we caught up with first author Rémi-Xavier[…]

The people behind the papers – You Wu & Mineko Kengaku

Posted by on March 12th, 2018

Neuronal migration is critical for mammalian brain development. In many migrating neurons, the nucleus translocates from the trailing to the leading edge of the cell in a manner dependent on the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, but how these cytoskeletons interact and their relative contribution to the forces that move the nucleus has remained unclear. This[…]

The people behind the papers – Marina Matsumiya & Ryoichiro Kageyama

Posted by on February 19th, 2018

Vertebrate segmentation involves the periodic formation of somites from the presomitic mesoderm, in a manner controlled by oscillating gene expression (the oscillations of the segmentation clock must be one of the marvels of nature!). While in vivo work has provided a framework for studying the process, many aspects of segmentation dynamics are obscured in the embryo. A new Techniques[…]

Updates from DORA – An interview with Stephen Curry

Posted by on February 7th, 2018

The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) was conceived in 2012 at an ASCB meeting, and has since its launch in 2013 has garnered thousands of signatories from individuals and organisations. Its aim is to improve the way in which the quality of research output is evaluated, with a key recommendation being the elimination of journal-based metrics[…]

The people behind the papers – Chloé Dominici & Alain Chédotal

Posted by on January 18th, 2018

Vertebrate brain development is characterised by cell migration, as neurons are often born far from where they need to end up. Migration is regulated by guidance cues and their receptors, but, problematically, many of these molecules are expressed throughout the brain, complicating efforts to spatially and temporally pin down their function. A paper in the[…]

The people behind the papers – Alok Javali, Aritra Misra & Ramkumar Sambasivan

Posted by on December 20th, 2017

Neuromesoderm progenitors are a population of stem cells that contribute to the neural tube and somite-forming paraxial mesoderm, and promote axial growth of the vertebrate embryo. In the latest issue of Development, a new paper addresses the transcriptional control of fate determination in this fascinating cell lineage. We caught up with co-first authors Alok Javali and[…]

The people behind the papers – Ross Carter, Yara Sánchez-Corrales, Verônica Grieneisen & Athanasius (Stan) Marée

Posted by on November 29th, 2017

Pavement cells in plant leaves were identified as a puzzle which deviated  from normal cell shape rules by D’Arcy Thompson in his classic text On Growth and Form. Now modern approaches allow researchers to revisit these problems and try to uncover the rules that govern pavement cell topology during leaf development. This week we feature a[…]

On Growth and Form at 100: The story behind the cover

Posted by on November 28th, 2017

Today marks the publication of Development’s special issue celebrating the centenary of D’Arcy Thompson’s ‘On Growth and Form’. Given the continuing influence of the book’s graphical elements – from its captivating transformation diagrams to its drawings of geometrically stunning invertebrate shells – the Development team knew that the cover of the issue had to reflect this[…]

The people behind the papers – Qiang Shao, Stephanie Herrlinger & Jian-Fu (Jeff) Chen

Posted by on November 16th, 2017

Zika infection in humans is associated with birth defects including microcephaly. Zika has two major lineages – the Asian lineage, which has been associated with birth defects, and the African lineage, which has not – but the relative effects of each strain on brain development, and the effects of the related dengue virus that co-circulates with[…]

The people behind the papers – David Turner & Peter Baillie-Johnson

Posted by on November 6th, 2017

Embryonic patterning is dependent on the establishment of the anteroposterior (AP) and dorsoventral axes early in development. In mammals this occurs by a breaking of symmetry in the epiblast, however the molecular mechanisms controlling this process are still not fully understood. This week we feature a paper published in the latest issue of Development that[…]