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Organ plumbing

Posted by on September 19th, 2018

Water is a fascinating substance. Its behavior sets a lot of interesting constraints on both how the surface of our world is shaped geologically and how life on said surface has adapted to optimize its use. Biology and geology, while vastly different in scale, share many commonalities that can we can learn from. Our work[…]

EMBL GROUP LEADER POSITION – Developmental Biology Unit

Posted by on September 5th, 2018

The Developmental Biology Unit seeks to understand the general principles and mechanisms underlying the development of multicellular organisms. Researchers in the unit combine the power of genetic model organisms with quantitative imaging and -omics technologies, synthetic biology, reduced (in vitro) systems and theoretical modelling, to create a cross-cutting approach to modern developmental biology. Research in[…]

Dating with cells – finding the right match

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

It’s an age-old mystery of the heart: do opposites attract, or will like do better with like? We can now answer this pressing question, at least for Drosophila cardioblasts: cells prefer to ‘swipe right’ on a shared transcriptional profile, but the resulting relationships are stronger if there are some unattractive alternatives around to remind them[…]

Fat to the forefront of histone regulation

Posted by on August 21st, 2018

All life requires energy. For early metazoan development, demand is especially high, as the transition from a single cell to a complex, multicellular organism requires a massive energetic input. In the earliest stages of development, however, an organisms’ inability to feed poses an apparent problem: how is the energy necessary to drive development obtained? In[…]

The Age-Long Quest for Bone Length Regulation

Posted by on August 9th, 2018

About a decade ago I came to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to work with my mentor, Jeff Baron, to study childhood growth and to tackle one of the unsolved mysteries in biology – mechanisms for body size determination (1). Years have passed, and we probably still don’t understand what makes an elephant an[…]

Postdoctoral Position in Developmental Biology and Human Disease, University of Oregon

Posted by on August 7th, 2018

https://www.grimes-lab.com Postdoctoral positions are available in the laboratory of Daniel T. Grimes, Institute of Molecular Biology and Department of Biology at the University of Oregon. The laboratory focuses on symmetry in the biological world. We are a new lab opening in January 2019. We want to understand how some features of vertebrate bodies (like limbs and[…]

Showing distributions

Posted by on August 6th, 2018

When reading about co-evolution of prey and predators, I stumbled across a cute new plot type: a half boxplot, half dot plot to show data distributions.   Wilson used this plot to simultaneously visualize summaries about their data (center, spread) and the actual data points. This allows us, the audience, to learn a lot about[…]

The toilet paper model

Posted by on August 3rd, 2018

  In LM Escudero´s group, we like developmental biology, mathematical biology and computational biology. We try to be imaginative and get inspiration from simple things… such as a toilet paper roll. Using this tool (and some computers), we claim that we have described a novel geometrical shape… You will be wondering… how do you do[…]

Going out on a limb to study organ growth

Posted by on August 2nd, 2018

Alexandra Joyner and Alberto Roselló-Díez tell us the story behind their recent paper in PLoS Biology1.   Today we have tried a new experiment (we cannot help it). Instead of elaborating too much on the scientific aspect of our recent paper about the control of organ growth in mammals1, we decided to tell the personal[…]

Testing Zimmermann’s Telome Theory

Posted by on August 1st, 2018

A perspective on our recent paper ‘CLAVATA was a genetic novelty for the morphological innovation of 3D growth in land plants’1.   In the 1950’s, the German botanist Walter Zimmermann (photo here) hypothesized a series of developmental transitions enabling plant forms to radiate during evolution2. Zimmermann’s so-called Telome Theory has received much attention from those[…]