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Alan Turing’s patterning system can explain the arrangement of shark scales

Posted by on November 7th, 2018

Understanding how complex biological patterns arise is a long standing and fascinating area of scientific research. The patterning, or spatial arrangement, of vertebrate skin appendages (such as feathers, hair and scales) has enabled diverse adaptations, allowing animals to both survive and thrive in varied and challenging environments. Such adaptations include temperature control of mammalian hair1[…]

Frog legs: they’re smarter than they look!

Posted by on October 22nd, 2018

By Sera Moon Busse Studying limb regeneration in model organisms is important for the advancement of regenerative medicine in humans. We set out to study regeneration in the hind limbs of the African Clawed Frog Xenopus laevis – this animal is able to regenerate its hind limbs very early in development, but it loses this[…]

Scaling the Fish: An L.A. Story

Posted by on October 18th, 2018

Jeff Rasmussen tells the story behind his recent paper from the Sagasti Lab in Dev Cell. This project began as an extension of my earlier postdoc work in Alvaro Sagasti’s lab investigating removal of axon debris following skin injuries in the larval zebrafish [1] and led me into scientific territory that I never anticipated. It[…]

Spider segmentation gets its SOX on!

Posted by on October 15th, 2018

There is a vast amount of information known about how some animals pattern their bodies into repeated segments, especially in the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, when compared to other arthropods, there are several characteristics that are derived in the fruit fly. It has a very short development time, a syncytium at the blastoderm stage allowing[…]

Post-doctoral position in pancreatic tissue engineering available in the Spagnoli lab.

Posted by on October 12th, 2018

A Postdoctoral position is available in the Spagnoli lab. in the Centre for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine at King’s College, London. Our team uses interdisciplinary approaches to study pancreas development and stem cells. The candidate will be part of an exciting EU-funded FET-Open consortium aiming at bioengineering pancreatic tissue. Developing therapies for pancreatic diseases,[…]

Make a difference: the alternative for p-values

Posted by on October 8th, 2018

Calculation and reporting of p-values is common in scientific publications and presentations (Cristea and Ioannidis, 2018). Usually, the p-value is calculated to decide whether two conditions, e.g. control and treatment, are different. Although a p-value can flag differences, it cannot quantify the difference itself (footnote 1). Therefore, p-values fail to answer a very relevant question:[…]

Staying in shape

Posted by on October 5th, 2018

If you’re into developmental biology, chances are you’ve spent some time in your life thinking about how cells change the shapes of tissues. What would cells need to do in order to prevent change of tissue shape, though? In the text below, I summarize my thoughts on why the question of not changing shape during[…]

Travel Grants: To Conferences of Your Choice

Posted by on October 4th, 2018

Antibodies.com is proud to support researchers with travel grants up to £500. The Award: Each quarter, Antibodies.com offers a travel grant up to £500 to help cover the cost of attending a conference. These travel grants are open to PhD candidates, lab managers, and post-docs from academic research institutions across Europe. The grant is intended[…]

Autonomous traffic – Wnt cytonemes lead the way.

Posted by on October 2nd, 2018

by Lauren Porter and Steffen Scholpp Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter, UK   The importance of Wnt signalling in developmental processes, wound healing and stem cell control has long been established. Historically, scientists attributed the transport of Wnt proteins from the source to the receiver cell to simple diffusion, however, this explanation did not[…]

The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium is creating an encyclopaedia of mammalian gene function, from embryo to adult

Posted by on September 28th, 2018

The entire genome of many species has now been sequenced, but the function of the majority of genes still remains unknown. This is where the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comes in, with the goal of characterising all 20,000 or so protein-coding mouse genes. To achieve this, genes are systematically inactivated then mice are put[…]