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When the obvious fails, look at the unexpected: interneuron individual behavior affects the population migration.

Posted by on March 19th, 2018

The story behind our paper: Cell-Intrinsic Control of Interneuron Migration Drives Cortical Morphogenesis. Carla G. Silva, Elise Peyre, Mohit H. Adhikari, Sylvia Tielens, Sebastian Tanco, Petra Van Damme, Lorenza Magno, Nathalie Krusy, Gulistan Agirman, Maria M. Magiera, Nicoletta Kessaris, Brigitte Malgrange, Annie Andrieux, Carsten Janke, Laurent Nguyen   The research behind this article is a[…]

In vivo profiling of chromatin accessibility with CATaDa

Posted by on March 13th, 2018

The following post is an introduction into the technnique described in our recent paper: Aughey, G.N., et al., CATaDa reveals global remodelling of chromatin accessibility during stem cell differentiation in vivo. Elife, 2018. 7.   Attempting to understand the biology of a complex organ, like the brain, comes with an array of technical challenges. Those[…]

The Curious Case of Protocadherin 19 Epilepsy

Posted by on March 12th, 2018

Daniel Pederick & Paul Thomas Comment on our paper: Pederick, et al. 2018. Abnormal Cell Sorting Underlies the Unique X-Linked Inheritance of PCDH19 Epilepsy. Neuron 97 (1).   Here we discuss the curious case of female-restricted epilepsy, an unusual disorder caused by mutations in the Protocadherin 19 (PCDH19) gene. How changes in this cell adhesion[…]

Team work, good science

Posted by on March 8th, 2018

You can find our recently published eLife paper here.   At the Euro-Evo-Devo meeting in Lisbao I saw a talk by Sylvie Rétaux and became hooked by a blind and unpigmented cavefish: the evo-devo model Astyanax mexicanus. I then had the chance to join Sylvie’s group in Gif-sur-Yvette (France) in 2013, for a post-doc. Four[…]

Stem cell fate choice: determined in an instant

Posted by on March 6th, 2018

Jun Chen National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing A discussion of our recent paper: Chen J, Xu N, Wang C, Huang P, Huang H, Jin Z, Yu Z, Cai T, Jiao R, Xi R. Transient Scute activation via a self-stimulatory loop directs enteroendocrine cell pair specification from self-renewing intestinal stem cells. Nat Cell Biol. 2018[…]

Conformation of the insulin receptor

Posted by on March 5th, 2018

A few days back over dinner at a CNV gathering, Theresia Gutmann from the Coskun lab casually told me about her PhD work. In collaboration with the Rockefeller University NYC, Theresia had visualized the changing conformation of the human insulin receptor upon insulin binding (paper). I made a sketchnote summarizing their discovery of a conformational[…]

Understanding cell- and tissue-level decision-making – a tense and crowded situation in the skin!

Posted by on February 23rd, 2018

The story behind our paper: Yekaterina A. Miroshnikova*, Huy Q. Le*, David Schneider*, Torsten Thalheim, Matthias Rübsam, Nadine Bremicker, Julien Polleux, Nadine Kamprad, Marco Tarantola, Irène Wang, Martial Balland, Carien M. Niessen, Joerg Galle & Sara A. Wickström. Adhesion forces and cortical tension couple cell proliferation and differentiation to drive epidermal stratification. Nature Cell Biology 20, p69–80[…]

Using human development to improve myogenesis from human pluripotent stem cells

Posted by on February 21st, 2018

A discussion of our recent paper: Hicks et al., ERBB3 and NGFR mark a distinct skeletal muscle progenitor cell in human development and hPSCs. Nature Cell Biology, January 1 2018   Approaching the problem of muscle disease with cell replacement therapy We will all be affected by a muscle wasting disease in our lifetime. The[…]

Genes activated in metastasis also drive the first stages of tumour growth

Posted by on February 19th, 2018

In spite of the difference between the cell functions responsible for giving rise to a tumour and for the metastasis of this same tumour, studies at IRB Barcelona using the fly Drosophila melanogaster reveal that some genes can drive both phenome na.   In cancer research, there has been a tendency to differentiate between the[…]

A journey towards uncovering the mechanics of embryonic polarization

Posted by on February 17th, 2018

The key results of our recent paper in Nature Cell Biology   Cell polarization defines the spatial biological specificities in a cell. During the first cell cycle of a C. elegans zygote, its symmetry is broken by local remodeling of the cortical actomyosin network. This leads to a segregation of the dedicated polarity regulators, the PAR[…]