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Displaying posts in the category: Science Art [Clear Filter]

Allometry in a Simple Cell Network

Posted by on September 19th, 2017

A post by Jasmin Imran Alsous, on work done in collaboration with Paul Villoutreix and Alexander M. Berezhkovskii in the Shvartsman lab. I started working on Drosophila egg chambers from the day I joined the Shvartsman lab. Egg chambers are small clusters of cells that eventually develop into mature oocytes in the abdomen of the female[…]

Mechanical control of the inner ear development

Posted by on September 14th, 2017

Prologue Molecular biological approaches to understanding the complex gene networks regulating development often resemble attempts to understand a Monet painting by looking at it up close. We find the links within a disorganized array of brush strokes and shapes but may miss the big picture. Our recent study is an example of how one must sometimes[…]

Embryosafari: an attempt at illustrating development

Posted by on September 12th, 2017

Hello, Community! In July, I revealed to the world my attempts at scientific illustration. Aidan (The Node’s Community Manager) took a keen interest in my work and was very kind to share it on social media. Here is my long-promised post about my biology art (which can be viewed at www.embryosafari.com). Before I delve into[…]

What Illustrators See that a Camera Can’t

Posted by on August 29th, 2017

Illustrator Natalya Zahn on the role of observation and visual interpretation in her work creating an addendum to Nieuwkoop and Faber’s classic Normal Table of Xenopus laevis   As an artist of science and nature subjects, I’m often asked what makes the work I do better than a photograph. It makes perfect sense to imagine that a[…]

Scales in scientific images

Posted by on August 6th, 2017

I recently saw drawings by Maria Sybilla Merian at Kupferstichkabinett Berlin and the University Library Dresden. Merian, who lived from 1647 to 1717, is renowned for her exceptional illustrations of biological specimens and gained recognition as a scientist for her nature observations, for example, of insect metamorphosis.     Merian evidently was genius in choosing[…]

Behind the scene of Embryology 2017: not just about the science

Posted by on August 3rd, 2017

Blog post written by Isabelle Vea – 2017 Embryology Student   All 24 of the 2017 Embryology students came to Woods Hole to learn from the best scientists in the developmental biology field. We were immersed in a unique setting to interact with established and promising investigators. In general, each invited lecturer came and spent from[…]

Unfolding collaboration

Posted by on July 18th, 2017

We came across this video from EuroStemCell describing a project that aimed to increase public awareness of stem cell biology, as well as encourage scientists to get involved in public engagement and interact with other professionals along the way. In their introduction to the video, EuroStemCell give us the background:   “Creative public engagement initiatives are[…]

Four recent science art & photography announcements

Posted by on July 13th, 2017

Worm art at #Worm17 Each year at the International C. elegans Conference Ahna Skop organises a Worm Art Show with winners selected by the meeting participants (find out more about the history of the show here).  2017’s winners have just been announced – read about them over at the GSA’s Genes to Genomes blog (a great site for your bookmarks[…]

D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form – 100 Years On and Still Growing!

Posted by on February 7th, 2017

“For the harmony of the world is made manifest in Form and Number, and the heart and soul and all the poetry of Natural Philosophy are embodied in the concept of mathematical beauty.”     D’Arcy Thompson’s On Growth and Form, which celebrates its centenary this year, is one of the key works at the[…]

A Fusion of Art and Science

Posted by on November 24th, 2016

Cytokinetic Abscission In the final step of cell division, the bridge connecting the cells is cut to give rise to two separate daughter cells – a fascinating process I have been working on since I started my PhD. This is a variation of my very first science-themed drawing, which I overlaid with an immunofluorescence staining labeling[…]