the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: arabidopsis [Clear Filter]

How a cell becomes a giant: a fluctuation-driven patterning mechanism

Posted by on March 22nd, 2017

Heather M. Meyer1, José Teles2, and Pau Formosa-Jordan2   1 Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology and the graduate field of Genetics, Genomics, and Development, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853 USA 2 Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1LR, UK   Comment on: Heather M. Meyer*, José Teles*, Pau Formosa-Jordan*, Yassin Refahi, Rita[…]

Live-cell analysis of plant embryogenesis: Live-cell imaging, optical manipulation, and micro-engineering technologies

Posted by on October 16th, 2015

In multicellular animals and plants, the single-celled zygote develops into the embryo. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the zygote divides asymmetrically to form a small cytoplasmic apical cell, which is the precursor of the proembryo, and a large vacuolated basal cell, which develops into the extra-embryonic suspensor (Figure 1). Communication between the intra-embryo (proembryo[…]

An interview with Caroline Dean

Posted by on August 18th, 2015

This interview first featured in Development.   Caroline Dean is a plant biologist based at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK. She helped to establish Arabidopsis as a model plant organism, and has worked for many years on the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate vernalisation, the process by which plants accelerate their flowering after periods of[…]

Postdoc position – Cell and Developmental Biology, John Innes Centre, UK

Posted by on August 20th, 2014

A 3-year postdoctoral position is available in the Sablowski lab at the Cell and Developmental Biology Dept., John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK. The successful candidate will work on a project that combines genome-wide association mapping and quantitative image analysis to reveal novel genes that control stem architecture in Arabidopsis.   Plant architecture depends in large[…]

A day in the life of an Arabidopsis lab

Posted by on February 6th, 2014

I, Narender Kumar, am a graduate student in Prof John C. Larkin’s lab. Our lab is located in the Life Sciences Building on the main campus of Louisiana State University (LSU) Baton Rouge. LSU is located on the banks of the historical Mississippi River and the river levee is the one of the best places[…]

@ICAR 2012: Introductory Workshop on the Mechanics of Plant Growth

Posted by on June 26th, 2012

Please join us on the first day of ICAR 2012  (Tuesday 2nd July 16.00-17.30) for a series of short topical introductions to the field and discussions. Find out how mechanics could enrich your everyday view of plants, and your research! The mechanics of plant growth is a historically rich field, which has provided great insight[…]

An interview with Ben Scheres

Posted by on December 22nd, 2010

(This interview by Kathryn Senior originally appeared in Development on December 21, 2010) Ben Scheres is an expert in plant development. He has been investigating development in Arabidopsis at Utrecht University, The Netherlands, since 1990, where his group uses the root tip as an easily accessible supply of plant stem cells. Ben agreed to be[…]

International experience

Posted by on November 26th, 2010

Hello, I am Terry Jackson, a 6th year PhD student in Genetics and Genomics at Duke University which is located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. I am working on my degree in the lab of Dr. Philip Benfey whose research focuses on identifying transcription factors in the root of Arabidopsis thaliana. I am pleased to[…]

In Development this week (Vol. 137, Issue 21)

Posted by on October 12th, 2010

Here are the research highlights from the current issue of Development: Oct1: essential for trophoblast development Most POU family transcription factors are temporally and spatially restricted during development and play pivotal roles in specific cell fate determination events. Oct1 (Pou2f1), however, is ubiquitously expressed in embryonic and adult mouse tissues; so, does Oct1 have a[…]

Arabidopsis song

Posted by on September 6th, 2010

“Why are there no pop hits about Arabidopsis?” sings Karmadillo. Even though their Arabidopsis song is not a pop hit (yet?) either, Karmadillo can at least lay claim to the honour of having performed it alongside other science-themed songs on the “Reproductive Stage” at the virtual 2010 Geek Pop festival. The song celebrates Arabidopsis as[…]