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The people behind the papers – Ximena Anleu Gil & Dominique Bergmann

Posted by on July 18th, 2018

Asymmetric division is a widespread mechanism for generating cellular diversity during developmental patterning. The stomata of flowering plants are epidermal valves that regulate gas exchange, and provide an accessible system to investigate the mechanisms of asymmetric cell division both within and across species. A paper in the new issue of Development reports an investigation of the molecular control of this[…]

All beauty must die

Posted by on July 9th, 2018

Anna Daneva, Zhen Gao and Moritz Nowack tell the story behind their recent paper in Nature Plants   The transience of flowers is proverbial. Degeneration of flowers is elicited after successful pollination by the onset of seed and fruit development. However, also unpollinated flowers do not last forever – on the contrary, the life span[…]

The people behind the papers – Pauline Anne & Christian Hardtke

Posted by on May 25th, 2018

Short CLE peptides regulate a wide variety of processes during plant development. In the developing root, the receptors and co-receptors for CLEs have remained largely unclear, as have the relationships between different CLEs and different (co-)receptors. A new paper in Development addresses this problem by reporting a new receptor kinase involved in CLE signaling. We caught[…]

The people behind the papers: Jun-Ho Ha, Hyo-Jun Lee and Chung-Mo Park

Posted by on May 11th, 2017

Our 20th instalment of this series comes from South Korea and features an investigation into the molecular basis of how temperature influences developmental transitions in Arabidopsis seedlings, recently published in Developmental Cell. We caught up with joint first authors Jun-Ho Ha and Hyo-Jun Lee, and their supervisor Chung-Mo Park, Professor in the Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University (SNU), to hear[…]

How a cell becomes a giant: a fluctuation-driven patterning mechanism

Posted by on March 22nd, 2017

Heather M. Meyer1, José Teles2, and Pau Formosa-Jordan2   1 Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology and the graduate field of Genetics, Genomics, and Development, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853 USA 2 Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1LR, UK   Comment on: Heather M. Meyer*, José Teles*, Pau Formosa-Jordan*, Yassin Refahi, Rita[…]

Live-cell analysis of plant embryogenesis: Live-cell imaging, optical manipulation, and micro-engineering technologies

Posted by on October 16th, 2015

In multicellular animals and plants, the single-celled zygote develops into the embryo. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the zygote divides asymmetrically to form a small cytoplasmic apical cell, which is the precursor of the proembryo, and a large vacuolated basal cell, which develops into the extra-embryonic suspensor (Figure 1). Communication between the intra-embryo (proembryo[…]

An interview with Caroline Dean

Posted by on August 18th, 2015

This interview first featured in Development.   Caroline Dean is a plant biologist based at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK. She helped to establish Arabidopsis as a model plant organism, and has worked for many years on the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate vernalisation, the process by which plants accelerate their flowering after periods of[…]

Postdoc position – Cell and Developmental Biology, John Innes Centre, UK

Posted by on August 20th, 2014

A 3-year postdoctoral position is available in the Sablowski lab at the Cell and Developmental Biology Dept., John Innes Centre, Norwich, UK. The successful candidate will work on a project that combines genome-wide association mapping and quantitative image analysis to reveal novel genes that control stem architecture in Arabidopsis.   Plant architecture depends in large[…]

A day in the life of an Arabidopsis lab

Posted by on February 6th, 2014

I, Narender Kumar, am a graduate student in Prof John C. Larkin’s lab. Our lab is located in the Life Sciences Building on the main campus of Louisiana State University (LSU) Baton Rouge. LSU is located on the banks of the historical Mississippi River and the river levee is the one of the best places[…]

@ICAR 2012: Introductory Workshop on the Mechanics of Plant Growth

Posted by on June 26th, 2012

Please join us on the first day of ICAR 2012  (Tuesday 2nd July 16.00-17.30) for a series of short topical introductions to the field and discussions. Find out how mechanics could enrich your everyday view of plants, and your research! The mechanics of plant growth is a historically rich field, which has provided great insight[…]