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Displaying posts with the tag: chromatin [Clear Filter]

Two birds with one stone: CTCF control of dynamic gene expression during heart development.

Posted by on October 9th, 2017

CTCF binds to chromatin and is thought of as an architectural protein in the genome. If the genome were a text, CTCF would act like the punctuation marks, so that words are grouped together becoming meaningful sentences. When I started my PhD, the Manzanares lab had been fruitfully collaborating with that of Jose Luis Gómez-Skarmeta at[…]

The dynamics of chromatin when life begins

Posted by on July 20th, 2016

Fertilization marks the start of life. This is followed by highly coordinated epigenetic reprogramming that allows protamine-histone exchange, zygotic genome activation, and the generation of a totipotent embryo. However, the true state of chromatin at the level of DNA during this crucial period is a long-standing mystery.   Our lab is dedicated to understanding epigenetic reprogramming[…]

Postdoctoral position in chromatin and epigenetic control of Drosophila development

Posted by on June 30th, 2016

Stockholm University, Sweden, invites applications for one postdoctoral position in the laboratory of Professor Mattias Mannervik at the Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute (http://www.su.se/mbw). The position is scheduled to start as soon as possible.   Transcriptional coregulators are proteins that facilitate communication between transcription factors and the basal transcription apparatus, in part by[…]

Of mice and men: exploring Mouse ENCODE

Posted by on December 17th, 2014

The Mouse ENCODE Project released a slew of papers late last month reporting findings from a three-year effort to comprehensively map functional elements in the mouse genome. Their major findings are summarized in an integrative paper in Nature (Yue, F. et. al., 2014). Similar to the goals of the human ENCODE project (The ENCODE Project Consortium,[…]

What do sperm have to do with brain tumors?

Posted by on October 2nd, 2014

  This post was originally published in the Knoepfler Lab Stem Cell Blog.      Sometimes in science there are unexpected threads tying seemingly very different things together. Unraveling the knots in these threads can lead to new insights into important developmental processes and mechanisms of disease. My lab studies epigenomic and transcription factors including[…]