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Displaying posts with the tag: genetics [Clear Filter]

PhD and postdoc positions in Luschnig Lab to study tricellular junctions

Posted by on November 22nd, 2016

The group of Stefan Luschnig at the Cluster of Excellence “Cells in Motion” (CiM) and the Institute of Neurobiology, University of Münster, invites applications for a PhD student and postdoc position The positions are available from February 2017 for three years. The Luschnig group investigates developmental, cellular, and molecular aspects of epithelial biology using a[…]

FaceBase: An online resource for craniofacial research

Posted by on August 16th, 2016

In 2009, FaceBase was launched in response to the need for more comprehensive analysis of craniofacial development: with so much craniofacial data being generated, there is a danger of relevant datasets being buried in the avalanche of genomic and other data. FaceBase is a curated, one-stop shop for facial development and research offering the community input and[…]

Postdoctoral position in developmental neurobiology

Posted by on July 7th, 2016

A postdoctoral position is available in the Page laboratory in the Department of Neuroscience at The Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Florida to investigate mechanisms of neurogenesis & gliogenesis, axon/dendrite growth and synaptic connectivity in the developing mouse cerebral cortex. A major goal of this project is to understand the influence of genetic risk factors for autism[…]

Sweetening with a pinch of salt: maximized Cas9 efficiency in zebrafish

Posted by on June 14th, 2016

  Alexa Burger, Mosimann lab, Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, University of Zürich, Switzerland. When I first heard about the “new” genome editing method in early 2013 called CRISPR-Cas9, I thought: “Never ever again will I work with targeted nucleases!” Now it’s mid-2016, we published our approaches to maximize Cas9 effectiveness in zebrafish with Development[…]

“Decoding the Language of Genetics”, a review

Posted by on February 7th, 2016

Modern biology is impossible to understand without genetics. Students today would struggle to understand Mendelian inheritance without the idea of the gene, and labs worldwide use molecular biology and genetic techniques to study different organisms and processes. Genetics has revolutionised the study of biology in the past century, and the study of genetic material keeps[…]

The human sex ratio at conception and the conception of scientific “facts”

Posted by on June 9th, 2015

Few things interest many people more than sex. For some, this means interest in practices and partners. For others, it means producing a son. There is an ocean of claims about how to do this. A quick Google search reveals claims that a woman can up the odds of a son by taking cough syrup,[…]

The science of the cat in your computer: our journey into crowdfunded sequencing of LilBUB

Posted by on April 27th, 2015

About a year ago – when spending some quality afterwork time on the Internet – me and my benchmate Dario stumbled upon LilBUB. If you’re an internet cat afficionado you’ve probably seen LilBUB around. She’s extremely cute and lovable, and she’s got something of a celebrity status. But, as developmental biologists, we were also intrigued by[…]

Giving scientific ideas a voice (and a video)

Posted by on May 20th, 2014

Explaining new scientific concepts can be a daunting task for anyone involved in outreach. We are constantly trying to come up with ways to explain, show and describe theories and ideas step by step. I’ve recently stumbled across a new app (albeit only available on ipad) called Adobe Voice that could help out scientific communication.[…]

What’s your favourite gene?

Posted by on April 11th, 2014

I recently took part in the ‘I’m a scientist, get me out of here!’ outreach event. As soon as the school children found out I was a developmental geneticist and worked out what I did, one question I was repeatedly asked was: “what’s your favourite gene and why?” so for a bit of fun, I[…]

silicoCROSS: a help in genetic crosses

Posted by on August 12th, 2013

I’m quite a lazy person, and as such I like to find solutions to boring and repetitive tasks. One of those is the drawing of punnett squares in Drosophila genetics. I wrote a little software (accessible here: silicocross.molecular.ch), that does basically that: drawing punnett squares. When you access the software you are asked how many[…]