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Displaying posts with the tag: transcription [Clear Filter]

Functional interrogation of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II in fruit flies

Posted by on April 24th, 2019

Feiyue Lu and David Gilmour tell the story behind their recent paper in Molecular Cell RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is the enzyme responsible for transcribing most genes in eukaryotes. The C-terminal domain (CTD) is a highly repetitive, unstructured domain on the largest Pol II subunit, Rpb1. It consists of numerous repeats of seven amino acids[…]

Postdoctoral position in Chromatin and Epigenetics in Drosophila Development

Posted by on December 19th, 2018

Stockholm University, Sweden, invites applications for one postdoctoral position in the laboratory of Professor Mattias Mannervik at the Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute (http://www.su.se/mbw). The position is scheduled to start as soon as possible. Transcriptional coregulators are proteins that facilitate communication between transcription factors and the basal transcription apparatus, in part by affecting[…]

Lighting Up the Central Dogma in Development

Posted by on June 19th, 2018

We recently published a manuscript in Cell that describes a method to image transcription factor concentration dynamics in real time, in living embryos, using a nanobody-based protein tag that we call the “LlamaTag.” We were particularly excited about these investigations because this new technology overcomes a major technical obstacle to understanding how gene-expression dynamics are[…]

Biotagging: Behind the scenes (and beyond)

Posted by on May 16th, 2017

“It finally got accepted!”, fol­­lowed by “It’s finally out!” about a month later. I am certain this ‘finally’ feeling about their paper is very familiar to those well-acquainted with the peer review process, and it was no different for our recently published Resource article. The ‘biotagging paper’, as we call it within the Sauka-Spengler lab,[…]

Post-doctoral fellowship in Cologne, Germany

Posted by on April 22nd, 2013

The Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC) is a multidisciplinary center at the University of Cologne providing a forum that brings together physician scientists with basic researchers from the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences to perform competitive basic, disease-oriented research. The mission of the CMMC is to advance the[…]

Post-doctoral position available: Neural crest development in Xenopus

Posted by on November 20th, 2012

SCHOOL OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF EAST ANGLIA   POST DOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATE POSITION AVAILABLE   Neural Crest Development in Xenopus   £30,122 to £35,938 per annum   A Post Doctoral Research Associate position to investigate the Regulation of Neural Crest development by transcriptional pausing is available in the lab of Dr. Grant Wheeler, School[…]

Post-doc position in Tunicates Developmental Biology

Posted by on October 25th, 2012

Post-doc position in Developmental Biology Development and evolution of median fin in chordates      A post-doc position is available in the group of Sébastien DARRAS. The group has been recently established at the marine station of Banyuls-sur-mer (Mediterranean coast, close to the Spanish border). We are interested in the molecular control of the ascidian Ciona[…]

BSDB-BSCB Meeting Report Part II

Posted by on June 21st, 2010

As announced in my last post, here is part two of the BSDB-BSCB Spring Meeting Report. It deals with two presentations on networks of transcription factors (TFs). During development, such dynamic networks of TFs and signaling molecules establish and maintain the spatio-temporal patterns of gene expression characteristic for the developing tissue. Using high throughput approaches[…]

BSDB-BSCB Meeting Report Part I

Posted by on June 12th, 2010

The recent joint meeting of the British Societies for Developmental Biology (BSDB) and Cell Biology (BSCB) in Warwick provided an exciting opportunity to catch a glimpse of the future of these two fields. “Old” questions of how cell fates are allocated during development are now being tackled with new technologies and new knowledge of how[…]