the community site for and by developmental biologists

A Farewell to (frog) Arms (apologies to Hemingway)

Posted by , on 15 December 2010

  The backstory to our recent Developmental Biology paper “The secreted integrin ligand nephronectin is necessary for forelimb formation in Xenopus tropicalis”  includes scenes of several members of the Zimmerman ...

Career development at the ASCB

Posted by , on 14 December 2010

It’s been a busy time for me at ASCB, held this year in Philadelphia. As a long standing member of the Women in Cell Biology (WICB) committee, I have been ...

My Hox genes were messed up

Posted by , on 13 December 2010

In Spring 2010, the Biol 460 Developmental Biology class at Pepperdine University in Malibu, Calfornia, made this video about Hox genes: Set to the tune of Ke$ha’s “Tik Tok”, but ...

Evolution of development and an uncommon model organism

Posted by , on 8 December 2010

We can all articulate the importance of using model organisms to understand biology, but many of us fall short in our understanding of some of the more uncommon model organisms.  ...

Ernst Haeckel and the recapitulation of an "early" biological debate

Posted by , on 8 December 2010

Scientists don’t spend free time to think about the changes that made possible the birth of a new way to make research. For example, how we moved from a world ...

Zebrafish transgenes go ubiquitous

Posted by , on 7 December 2010

The Node’s staff has kindly asked me to write a little “behind the scenes” on our zebrafish paper released today in Development, “Ubiquitous transgene expression and Cre-based recombination driven by ...

In Development this week (Vol. 138, Issue 1)

Posted by , on 7 December 2010

The first issue of 2011 is out now…here are the highlights: Geminin control of lineage commitment The transition between pluripotency and multi-lineage commitment during early embryogenesis must be closely regulated ...

Echinoderm development on film

Posted by , on 6 December 2010

“I also here salute the echinoderms as a noble group especially designed to puzzle the zoologist.” Libbie Hyman, 1955 Echinoderms are fascinating creatures. They have extensive regenerative capabilities, a mutable ...

Keeping up with the Node

Posted by , on 6 December 2010

Like more than 500 million people in the world, the Node is now on Facebook . Our foray into Facebook was slightly overshadowed by the British royal family doing exactly ...

Developmental biology art from Japan

Posted by , on 1 December 2010

The RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology has released the images for a series of postcards under a creative commons license. The images picture a wide range of both common and ...

Navigate the archive

Here you can filter posts by date, category or popular tags.  You can also use the search box.

Search Posts

Filter by date

Filter by category