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An evolutionary fable: the black pencil and the rubber.

Posted by on June 18th, 2020

By Héloïse Dufour, Shigeyuki Koshikawa and Cédric Finet In this post we will discuss our recent paper entitled “Temporal flexibility of gene regulatory network underlies a novel wing pattern in flies” [1]. We initiated the present project in Sean Carroll’s lab where the pigmentation in drosophilids was used as a model to study evolutionary genetics.[…]

The people behind the papers – Heidi Connahs, Sham Tlili, Timothy Saunders and Antónia Monteiro

Posted by on May 28th, 2019

This interview, the 63rd in our series, was recently published in Development Butterfly eyespots are striking examples of animal patterning, but their developmental origins are still relatively poorly understood. A new paper in Development– the result of a collaboration between two Singapore-based labs – now combines CRISPR-Cas9 gene targeting with theoretical modelling to address the role of the[…]

Why more is better in comparative developmental biology…

Posted by on January 26th, 2018

Our recent paper in “Nature” [1] deconstructs molecular arguments that have been used to homologize bilaterian nerve cords. Our work illustrates well the strength of the comparative approach and the broad sampling across the animal tree of life that we use in my research group at the Sars Centre for Marine Molecular Biology.   Evo-Devo[…]

Baby cichlids working out their jaws

Posted by on August 14th, 2017

I joined Dr. Craig Albertson’s lab as a graduate student in 2009, where I quickly became fascinated by these cute cichlid fishes. They’re colorful, they breed their young in the mouth, and some of them have funny looking faces like this blue mbuna (Labeotropheus fuelleborni):     My research started on the genetic control of[…]

A day in the life of a mayfly lab

Posted by on January 5th, 2017

I am Isabel Almudi, a postdoctoral researcher in Fernando Casares’ lab, at the Andalusian Centre for Developmental Biology (CABD) in Seville, Spain. In the lab we are focused on studying the control of organ size and identity during development and evolution.     The lab uses the development of insect eyes to investigate the mechanisms[…]