the community site for and by developmental biologists

Displaying posts with the tag: is_archive [Clear Filter]

Preventing cellular mixing with programmed cell death

Posted by on February 12th, 2020

By Lisandro Maya-Ramos and Takashi Mikawa Bilaterality, the property of having two symmetrical sides, is widely conserved among animals. It is estimated that 99% of all animal species are bilaterians, with the remaining 1% composed by sponges and radial animals, which lack or have radial symmetry respectively (1).  Although bilaterality is widespread among animals, little[…]

A domino effect on brain developmental evolution

Posted by on December 6th, 2019

The discipline “Evo-devo” studies the developmental basis of morphological evolution. In the field, some original animal models are emerging as interesting model organisms, enriching the knowledge in the field more and more. In the DECA team (Développement et évolution du cerveau antérieur, in French) we use an Evo-devo approach to study the developmental mechanisms responsible[…]

Of mice and chicks…

Posted by on October 1st, 2018

This is the latest dispatch from a recipient of a Development Travelling Fellowship, funded by our publisher The Company of Biologists. Learn more about the scheme, including how to apply, here, and read more stories from the Fellows here.   Barbara Swierczek   I am a PhD student at the University of Warsaw in Poland. In[…]

Pitx2c sets the stage for gastrulation

Posted by on August 23rd, 2018

In our recently published paper https://elifesciences.org/articles/34880, we report that the transcription factor Pitx2c has an unexpected role during gastrulation, where it acts cell non-autonomously to promote mesendodermal cell migration required for axis extension in zebrafish.     “It is not birth, marriage or death which is the most important time in your life, but gastrulation. –[…]

A Crumby affair: Cell ingression during gastrulation

Posted by on January 31st, 2017

Comment on “Crumbs2 promotes cell ingression during the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition at gastrulation” Ramkumar N, Omelchenko T, Silva-Gagliardi NF, McGlade CJ, Wijnholds J, Anderson KV. Nat Cell Biol. 2016 Dec;18(12):1281-1291   “It is not birth, marriage, or death, but gastrulation, which is truly the most important time in your life.” Lewis Wolpert (1986)   Aptly stated by Wolpert, gastrulation is the fundamental process[…]

The rabbit blastocyst modelling (for) vertebrate gastrulation

Posted by on January 5th, 2015

Form and function of animal gastrulation have been longstanding classics accompanying the rise of experimental embryology, and – as if to square the circle in the literal sense – the blastopore of Haeckel’s original ‘gastrea’ stage[1] was soon (and still is) considered analogous to the straight primitive streak of birds and mammals[2-4]. Both forms are[…]

Gastrulation: Local actions, global movements and self-organisation

Posted by on June 6th, 2014

Cells move in (still) mysterious ways to achieve morphogenesis. Prominently, cells of an early vertebrate embryo (blastula, a mass of undifferentiated cells) move extensively during gastrulation to generate the three basic layers of the organism: ectoderm at the surface, endoderm presaging the digestive tube, and the mesoderm in between. At the end of the process,[…]

X-rays and frog embryos: new features of gastrulation revealed

Posted by on August 19th, 2013

For decades, the development of the early embryo and patterning of tissues has been studied with the help of a workhorse of developmental biology, the frog embryo.  Xenopus embryos are large and undergo clear morphological changes throughout their development that make them very quick and easy to work with in answering questions surrounding the formation[…]

Bio Web Conferences – Critical discussions with developmental biologists for deep learning.

Posted by on February 10th, 2012

Dear Developmental biology community, I would like to bring to your attention a potentially valuable resource for your teaching and research endeavors.  I am a neurodevelopmental biologist at Smith College.  I started teaching a course in Developmental Biology back in 2005, and since then have been utilizing web conferencing technology to bring the research behind[…]

A wave from Quintay

Posted by on January 31st, 2012

The International course on Developmental Biology was a great experience, both instructive and mind-opening. All the students were shuttled to the remote and very small fishing village of Quintay, where the CIMARQ, the investigation centre where the course took place, is located. Originally a whaling station, this centre is dedicated to the instruction of professionals[…]